161 reputation
16
bio website localhost:80
location Japan
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Aug 29 '13 at 22:05
Q. How well do you handle work under pressure?
A. I prefer working under around 1024 hPa.

Mar
14
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
29
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
19
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
9
awarded  Precognitive
Nov
20
comment What's a good breakdown of all the sugars in regards to brewing?
Normal brewers' yeast lacks the ability to break down lactose. Furthermore, they are unable to eat galactose so at best it can only be fermented up to 50%. There are GM strains and some wild yeasts which can do better, though. As an aside, some strains of lactic bacteria will first break down the lactose leaving glucose or at least some half digested by-product which the yeast can eat.
Nov
19
comment Consequences of infection in a beer?
@roxOr I don't know the answer for sure. However, if you aren't raising the botulism bacteria where is the botulin going to come from? It's probably not very advisable to keep unfermented wort in anaerobic conditions at room temperature and then not boiling it before use. But that has nothing to do with brewing. It isn't advisable to lace the wort with botox or methanol, either.
Nov
16
comment Brewing Solid Things: Can Leftover Yeast Be Used for Bread?
All yeasts produce the same CO2, what changes is attenuation, ie. the amount of sugars they can eat. Bread yeast is a dry yeast and that translates to lots of CO2. Beer yeasts are usually on the sweet side and don't produce so much.
Nov
14
comment Consequences of infection in a beer?
Spores of clostridium botulinum are everywhere, they also happen to be inactivated easily. In a homebrew, first by oxygen presence and then by alcohol. I'd only worry about that if your batch hasn't fermented at all. I'd think it twice before drinking something that had mold growing on grain, though. Mycotoxins are scarier than botox.
Nov
10
comment What's the best method to catch a strain of wild yeast for homebrewing?
In this answer, for example, there are hops which is an ingredient that is easy to buy in most countries, but doesn't grow wild on most places. Still as it is used here for its anti-bacterial properties, it might have local replacements. And for beer you are using hops anyways. Petri dishes are relatively easy to get but nobody has them at home and a good culture medium is a bit harder.
Nov
9
awarded  Supporter
Nov
9
awarded  Autobiographer
Nov
9
awarded  Student
Nov
9
asked What's the best method to catch a strain of wild yeast for homebrewing?