338 reputation
214
bio website billshomebrewing.blogspot.com
location Los Angeles, CA
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Feb 2 '11 at 17:52

Dec
15
comment Reusable Beer Label
This was my first thought as well.
Dec
8
comment How to smoke your malts
I've never tried smoking grains, but could you put the barley in a coffee roaster and toss in some hickory?
Dec
8
comment How to smoke your malts
In a hookah? :-D
Dec
3
comment Is 55% ABV “beer” actually beer?
From what I understand of eisbocks, and I may be wrong about this, the beer is frozen, and then thawed. The ice that forms is never removed, but instead is reconstituted with the beer. This is different from what the BrewDog guys were doing. They actually remove the ice from the beer. I was originally asking about the process of freezing and scraping, but now I'm curious about all of the things we can do to beer and still be able to call it beer.
Dec
3
comment Is 55% ABV “beer” actually beer?
Gruit is considered beer, but doesn't satisfy the M-W definition you quote since it is not flavored with hops.
Dec
3
comment Is 55% ABV “beer” actually beer?
1) It has a lower limit requirement for ABV, but no upper limit requirement, and 2) it basically says "beer is whatever we collectively have consensus to call beer." The mathematician side of me cringes as the imprecision of the definition, but I understand it needs to be able to accommodate the possibility of new creations becoming beer.
Dec
3
comment Is 55% ABV “beer” actually beer?
Thanks Casey. Some comments on that definition:
Dec
3
comment Is 55% ABV “beer” actually beer?
My question about it being beer had less to do with the ABV than with the amount of processing it has undergone. By way of analogy, consider a tree. There are no restrictions in the definition of a tree that limit the height, number of branches, color and shape of leaves, etc. But when a tree is processed in some way (chopped down and turned it into a pile of 2x4s, falls and rots away, burns in a forest fire, etc.) we no longer call it a tree.
Dec
3
comment Is 55% ABV “beer” actually beer?
The comments below generate some good discussion. Can someone provide our current working definition of beer? That should be a good place to start answering my question.
Nov
26
comment Wort aeration on a budget
Shake it like a Polaroid picture.
Nov
24
comment How to brew all-grain indoors
I have no porch or patio, but I do have roof access. I'm not interested in exploring the roof as an option, and generally feel lazy about lugging equipment from site to site.
Nov
24
comment How to brew all-grain indoors
@JackSmith DMS?
Nov
24
comment How to brew all-grain indoors
This is interesting. I'll keep this in mind for the future. Thanks!
Nov
24
comment How to brew all-grain indoors
Those look kind of bad ass. What are the chances that I burn down my entire block with these things?
Nov
24
comment How to brew all-grain indoors
Yes, I meant the electric elements on stoves. I only boil about 2.5 gallons when I brew, and I just barely get it to a boil.
Nov
17
comment I want to brew this American IPA kit with some ginger — terrible idea or give it a go?
I should say, this advice is second hand. See these related questions with similar answers: brewadvice.com/questions/1686/sarsaparilla-beer brewadvice.com/questions/1787/a-new-beer-with-a-hint-of-soy
Oct
29
comment Small batch size brewing trub issues
I brewed a one gallon recipe last night and it's sitting in a homemade 6-8 quart plastic primary fermenter. I'll update on trub levels once fermentation is complete.
Oct
27
comment Has anyone used molasses in a beer?
A recipe in the most recent Zymurgy confirms this. The recipe (SchwarzBier or something like that) calls for 0.5 lbs of molasses in a 5 gallon batch. A quick internet search suggests that 1 lb of molasses has a volume of 1.4 cups, so 0.5 lbs. is about 3/4 of a cup. So, JackSmith's recommendation translates to no more than one pound of molasses per 5 gallon batch.
Oct
18
comment A new beer with a hint of soy
This advice is strikingly similar to the advice you gave me here: brewadvice.com/questions/1686/sarsaparilla-beer This is a great method for experimenting with "radical" flavorings in beer. And, it's fun to have friends over to play with beer and see what they think.
Oct
2
comment Too much Irish moss?
It does have a seaweed smell to it in the jar. I just wanted to make sure that I wasn't going to get any of the seaweed flavor in my beer.