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Software Developer - currently working in the Microsoft ASP.NET Stack with C#, MVC, JavaScript, CSS, HTML


Aug
26
comment Which strains of yeasts are the cleanest for warm/hot fermentation?
Brewing in a place where the ambient temp doesn't fall below 75F means that you will have to do something to cool the wort as it ferments, unless you only want to brew Saisons. So don't spend your time looking for clean, 75-80F tolerant yeast (doesn't really exist), instead you should look into creating a fermentation chamber or swamp cooler to keep the temps down. Then you can brew anything!
Aug
16
comment Removing oily film
@Scott, I also use that schedule for kegged beers and it works pretty well for most beers, but maybe not ones that need those high, "prickly" levels of carbonation.
Aug
15
comment Cold water extraction of hop flavors from fresh hops?
Indeed. If dry hopping lead to any kind of noticeable increase in infections, then it would never have become such a 'standard' practice when brewing hoppy beers.
Aug
15
answered Removing oily film
Aug
15
comment How can I save my beer after long delay before bottling?
By "tub" I really hope you mean something other than a bath tub. Prohibition is over, you realize!
Jul
25
comment Lagering an Ale
FWIW a lot of lager brewers bottle condition after 3-4 months of lagering without the need to add fresh yeast. Those little guys are hardier than we sometimes give them credit for, and plenty remain in suspension for bottle conditioning, even with a long crash/lager.
Jul
25
comment Home brewing with different sugars
I can't get the link right now (at work) but google "The Mad Fermentationist", which is a blog by a brilliant homebrewer. He has done at experiments with various sugars, where he used the same base beer but added up to 6 different sugars in the batches, to evaluate their differences side-by-side. That will be great data for you. Basically, as I recall, the darker sugars do kick off a lot of flavor, but the lighter/golden ones usually aren't that noticeable (honey is a slight exception).
Jul
25
comment Does Thomas Hardy use a separate bottling yeast strain?
Using a more-attenuative strain to bottle seems like a terrible idea, unless you are intentionally using less priming sugar that otherwise required, which will take some experimentation to get right. FWIW, commercial breweries ferment under much more pressure than home brewers, which reduces the ester profile of the beer. Its going to be really, really hard for a home brewer to ferment a beer to the 13-14% ABV range that still tastes clean.
Jul
17
comment Pitched Yeast at 80-85 deg. Problem?
Yeah, I remember being surprised by how slowly 5gal of wort heats up or cools off to room temp when I started brewing. 12 degrees above ambient can happen during active fermentation, but it usually takes a day or two of heavy activity before it builds that high.
Jul
17
comment Murky beer, no bubbles in airlock?
Be careful with the Beano. It works, but I've read that you must give the beers several weeks more time in the carboy, or else you risk bottle bombs.
Jul
16
comment Pitched Yeast at 80-85 deg. Problem?
If the yeast has only been in the wort 5.5 hours, then its not fermentation that's causing the heat.
Jul
1
comment Adding a spigot to a fermentation bucket what is a good height?
Regardless of where you end up placing the spigot, you should research the different yeast strains to find the best one for your desired style which will produce a tight yeast cake. S-04, for example, is an English yeast that compacts into a very tight cake. This is obviously very desirable for you if you don't want the spigot below the yeast level.
Jun
18
comment For a Swamp Cooler, what alternatives are there to Bleach, Vodka, and Star San?
Yeah, too bad you can't really keep it free of contaminants in a swamp cooler. Does oxygen exposure start neutralizing StarSan too? I can't recall off the top of my head.
Jun
17
answered For a Swamp Cooler, what alternatives are there to Bleach, Vodka, and Star San?
Jun
17
comment interesting formation in fermenting beer
Bad news. You've been infected with: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portugese_Man_of_War Go ahead and dump it now before it starts stinging you.
Jun
10
comment Effect of priming with honey
I'd suggest start by adding a pound or so of honey to the beer after primary fermentation is done, letting the honey ferment out completely, then bottling with normal priming sugar. That way you can see how the honey impacts the beer's flavor without worrying about getting the priming wrong.
Jun
5
comment Light & fermenting
I used to use the cardboard box my carboy came in. I just taped the flaps(?) at the top open, so the height was extended a few inches, and now it slides right over the carboy + airlock, sealing out the light completely.
Jun
5
comment Is this a bottle bomb waiting to happen?
I don't think #3, #4, or #5 are anything to fear. The boil doesn't do anything to break down sugars; that happens in the mash. And I believe what occurs in the boil is actually NOT true "caramelization" (well maybe just a tiny bit right on the bottom of the pot), because you can't really caramelize at 212F. #5 was just that you never hit the hot break for all the wort, due to the massive gravity. That MIGHT cause clarity or head problems down the road, but shouldn't impact fermentability.
Jun
5
comment Too much sweetness and banana like aroma/taste
No, I mean that the carboy itself and the fermenting wort should be right at 65F. By using a stick-on thermometer (or better yet, a probe thermometer in the liquid itself, like a ThermoWell), you eliminate the need to care about the temp difference in the surrounding environment. Different kinds of fermentations throw different amounts of heat, (as low as 2-3 degrees F, or as high as 14-15), so its better to just measure the temp of the wort than to try to plan how cold to get the surrounding liquid or air.
Jun
4
comment Too much sweetness and banana like aroma/taste
The "Swamp Cooler" mentioned above is the best way to cheaply/easily regulate the carboy's temp. I would just add that you need to stick a thermometer strip onto the carboy right above the water line. Then, add enough frozen bottles to keep the carboy thermometer strip reading a constant 65F for most ales.