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Feb
15
comment What is a stir plate?
If his question was something not so simple, like "how much growth occurs in a starter?" then I'd understand. His 2 questions ('what's the function', and 'does it improve the starter') are both easily answered with the simple Google search.
Feb
14
answered What is a stir plate?
Feb
14
comment What will happen to this un-sanitized batch of Wheat beer?
Just a minor quibble: I don't put nearly as much importance into re-hydrating dry yeast. Brew Your Own magazine and Basic Brewing Radio did a collaborative experiment to test re-hydrating vs. just sprinkling, and although the sample size wasn't huge, there was basically no discernible difference in flavor between the two processes. For a 1st time brewer, there are easily 20 other things they should focus on before worrying about re-hydrating.
Feb
13
answered Heating Methods
Feb
9
answered How do you make your own recipe?
Feb
9
answered Appropriate aging technique for high OG beers
Feb
7
comment Is it ever unsafe to drink an aged beer?
The relatively low pH of beer, combined with the presence of alcohol, means that beer is not a very easy medium for harmful bacteria to grow. This is not to say that your beer can't "go bad". Just leave your carboy uncovered for a few days outside and see what happens. But "going bad" for beer usually means a harmless (and sometimes delicious) secondary infection from a wild yeast or a roaming bug. Even in the worse case with the dreaded acetobacter turning your beer into vinegar, the resulting liquid is still "safe" to drink (and to put on Fish & Chips, yum!) Hooray beer!!
Feb
6
comment What to look for in a temperature controller
I also like Rebel. Good online shop.
Feb
3
comment What to look for in a temperature controller
No the Thermowell is essentially an extension to the controller probe mounted on what's basically a bung, so that the probe extension reaches does into the fermenting liquid itself. Check out this link: morebeer.com/view_product/16672/beerwinecoffee/…
Feb
2
answered What to look for in a temperature controller
Feb
1
comment Nothing visible happening in fermenter after three and a half days - what should I do?
Yep, Scum + yeasty smell = everything is fine.
Jan
30
comment Bottling high Alcohol beer
Because the alcohol level of your beer is 10.6%, so the T-58 will still be viable. Beyond that, sprinkling in 1 packet of dry yeast will be much easier than making a starter with liquid. However, if you are already planning to culture up some more Wyeast Belgian Abby for another starter/beer, then you can use that. I just wouldn't invest in a fresh pack of it plus the DME for the starter then a packet of T-58 is cheaper/easier.
Jan
30
comment Why is my starting gravity low?
Even with kits, its always good to keep a few pounds of Light Dry Malt Extract on hand for yeast starters and quick gravity modifications. I do All Grain exclusively, but still keep some LDME around for these purposes.
Jan
30
comment Secondary fermentaton objectives
Bears hate sediment in their bottles. And angry bears find homebrewers delicious, as we are already pre-marinated with booze. So it's pretty important to keep the bears happy.
Jan
30
comment Batch carbonation vs bottle carbonation
Yep, if you really can't stand the sediment in the bottles the ONLY way to get around that is to force carbonate a keg with C02, and then use a beer gun device to fill the bottles.
Jan
30
comment Why is my starting gravity low?
Going by tradition, British beers are mashed around 1-1.5 qt/lb, which could be considered "thick". By contrast, German and Belgian beers are mashed "thin", from 1.5-2.5+ qt/lb. Thicker mashes leave more dextrinous wort, whereas thinner mashes dry the final beer out more. Efficiency typically goes up the thinner you mash, to a point. You can mash as high as 3 qt/lb (Brew In a Bag Technique) without any problems in the final beer.
Jan
30
comment Why is my starting gravity low?
Per my answer "simply throw in an extra 1-2 pounds of base malt". Or a pound or so of dry malt extract, which is what I do if my gravity seems off. I know where the 5gal point is in my brew kettle, so I'll pull a sample when I hit 5gal and adjust as needed by adding some dry extract.
Jan
27
answered Why is my starting gravity low?
Jan
26
answered Bottling high Alcohol beer
Jan
24
comment Do I truly need a wort chiller?
My all grain batches boil down to about 4.5gal, so you could do this exact technique with all grain as well. If you are concerned about waste, another good technique is to use a wort chiller in conjunction with a recirculating pump and a bag of ice.