1,910 reputation
119
bio website homebrew.stackexchange.com/…
location Minneapolis, MN
age 44
visits member for 1 year
seen 6 hours ago

I am primarily an all-grain brewer, and I mostly brew recipes of my own design. I like brewing at a small-batch scale (2.5 gallons and less) because they allow me to brew on my countertop and more frequently. I can experiment without having to risk ending up with 5+ gallons of a failed batch. My gateway beers into homebrewing were Summit's Extra Pale Ale and Great Northern Porter.


Oct
15
comment What is Fermcap-S and what does it do?
Here is the regulation that limits occurrence of the active ingredient in Fermcap to 10 ppm.
Oct
6
comment How to clean the inside of a refrigerator?
I have found that the gummy stuff in fridges responds well to hot water, and a washcloth or Dobie-brand non-scratch scrubber. After that, I use a vinegar-and-water spray.
Oct
1
comment How does the attenuation limit from mash temperature affect yeast attenuation?
On this topic, I am reading Brewing with Wheat, and I am struck by how the brewers change their mash profile for each batch of grain, knowing that while it all may be wheat, the wheat from one particular farmer is different than the wheat from another.
Oct
1
comment How does the attenuation limit from mash temperature affect yeast attenuation?
This is not a direct answer, but doing a forced ferment test on your wort is highly recommended to determine the attenuation limit for that particular wort.
Oct
1
comment How does the attenuation limit from mash temperature affect yeast attenuation?
Sorry, on the second question, I am not aware of a resource like that. I think it would be hard to put together because you will have variability even if you could keep mash temp stable to laboratory degrees of precision because wort fermentability likely correlates with water-to-grist ratio, mash pH, and sparging technique. On the first question, it seems like you would still have variability -- each yeast cell has its own preferences and limit for fermenting the sugars from the most readily fermentable (glucosse) to more difficult to ferment (like maltotriose).
Sep
30
comment How does the attenuation limit from mash temperature affect yeast attenuation?
The attenuation ranges specified for yeast do not apply to your wort. They are merely provided by yeast labs for you to be able to compare yeast strains from the same lab. Those numbers come from fermenting a standardized (for their lab) lab specification wort that may have little bearing on your particular beer. Also many other other factors affect attenuation besides wort, including pitching rate, yeast's health and prior history, yeast strain, availability of yeast nutrients, alcohol level, temperature, and other competing microorganisms.
Sep
30
comment Camping stove as a wort heater
Add to the Cons: it burns through propane like there is no tomorrow.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
29
revised Pot or cooler based mash tun?
corrected spelling
Sep
29
revised Ale is cloudy and really fizzy
added 6 characters in body; grammar
Sep
29
answered Ale is cloudy and really fizzy
Sep
29
revised Easiest low on alcohol homebrew
fixed spelling
Sep
29
comment Easiest low on alcohol homebrew
I think OP is asking for a "method", i.e. how to homebrew all-grain "without much apparatus" with the aim to "produce a 3-4% alcoholic beer from wheat".
Sep
29
answered Easiest low on alcohol homebrew
Sep
29
answered Pot or cooler based mash tun?
Sep
29
revised Efficiently sterilizing bottles
improved post
Sep
29
comment [WIKI] Bottle Sanitizing Techniques - Pros & Cons
Anecdotal evidence suggests that the heating and cooling cycle, especially when repeated, weakens the glass. If true, this makes the risk of glass breakage and resultant injuries another "con" of the baking method.
Sep
29
comment Efficiently sterilizing bottles
Here is link to a post on sanitizing vs. sterilizing.
Sep
29
answered Efficiently sterilizing bottles
Sep
29
comment Efficiently sterilizing bottles
To clear up terminology, Bruclens is a cleanser and sanitizer, and not a sterilizer. Cleaning is removing organic and inorganic deposits from the surface. You cannot effcetively sanitize until you clean. Sanitizing kills 99.999% percent of unwanted microorganisms such as bacteria, wild yeast, and other fungo. Sterilizing is killing 99.99999999% of microorganisms, and is usually done in an autoclave.