216 reputation
17
bio website
location Oslo, Norway
age 36
visits member for 1 years, 2 months
seen Mar 27 at 21:47

I am a scientific researcher at Centre of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry at the University of Oslo. I work at the ERC funded project ABACUS, studying mainly the fundamentals of density functional theory for atoms and molecules. This involves some functional analysis, convex analysis, quantum mechanics and a little chemistry.

I also stydy numerical methods for quantum systems in general, and in particular for time evolution of the manybody Schrödinger equation.

In short: a mathematically oriented physicist with chemistry aspirations.


Mar
5
comment Conversion efficiency
Thanks! This was very enlightening.
Feb
6
comment Is my beer oxidized?
Yeah, I think it is a mild infection, the more I think about it.
Feb
6
comment Is my beer oxidized?
Thanks! I have also been thinking that it must be harder to oxidize beer. I am a very careful homebrewer ... This is the first time it has happened, and I am willing to put money on the harvested yeast and 48 hours of aerated wort as the sinner here.
Feb
6
comment Is my beer oxidized?
Thanks! I noticed some small bubbles on the inside of the glass of all the bottles, see edit above. Does this support the infection hypothesis? I would not say that the beer tastes "really bad", just "not good".
Feb
6
comment Is my beer oxidized?
No, not at all.
Nov
20
comment Secondary additions to a Barleywine
But what will FG be, according to the recipe? It matters a lot with respect to what will be great additions.
Nov
14
comment What does “steeping hops” mean?
Thanks for the considerations here! If not exactly what I was looking for, it was worth archiving for future retrieval. :-)
Nov
14
comment What does “steeping hops” mean?
Thanks, this is very useful information.
Nov
14
comment What does “steeping hops” mean?
Interesting approach! Do you have a reference?
Nov
14
comment What does “steeping hops” mean?
Thanks! But would not letting the wort stand hot (at approx boiling temperature) produce DMS? At least, that's what Palmer lists as reason to rapidly start chilling after the boil: DMS is constantly produced. Also, any chance for a reference describing this technique of steeping/slightly chilling the wort?
Nov
4
comment Yeast comparison source
This is great! Thanks.
Aug
28
comment Adding juniper berries to secondary
Thanks for the answer, and for very interesting facts and links! I considered soaking in vodka, and might try it the next time. I have already added the berries, well after primary fermentation is complete. It is only a test batch, and we will see how it progresses ... A nice aroma from the berries at the present stage.
Aug
23
comment Question about hop schedule and BIAB
Good luck with the brewing! :)
May
17
comment What is a good resource for flavor contributions of different ingredients?
Av very useful resource.
May
16
comment Fitering BIAB wort
Thanks, this is a useful comment.
May
16
comment Fitering BIAB wort
Thanks for the link! Alas, for now, we grind our grains in the brewshop ... I tried the sifting. I actually did an experiment, making two identical mashes with and without the sifting. Sifting produced as much as 10 % fine flour that was discarded, and a corresponding decrease in efficiency. But the amount of cloudy material was the same -- virtually no change. I should perhaps sifted even more strongly, but IMO this is not the way to go. Conditioned milling must be much better.
May
15
comment Fitering BIAB wort
Thanks! The finer mesh is a good idea; the particles are definitely due to the mesh width (~1 mm). My first BIAB batch turned out fine -- the stuff settled nicely in the end. However, I am concerned about the taste effects of boiling lots of husk.
May
14
comment What is the potential of rock candi sugar?
You are right, and thanks for the reference! I am actually brewing "Lefty Blonde", and puched in the recipe a while ago. About invert sugar etc: I am sure I have "read somewhere" that inverted sugar is more healthy for the yeast than sucrose, the reasone related to the yeast avoiding invertase production in the former. AFAIK inverted sugar = sucrose split into glucose and fructose by hydrolyzation (i.e., using invertase from yeast). I have, again, "read somewhere" that table sugar can contain a mixture of sucrose, fructose and glucose. Hence the range of inversion...I may be wrong of course.
May
14
comment Fitering BIAB wort
Thanks! We will go for WhirFloc and see what happens, and take it from there.
May
14
comment What is the potential of rock candi sugar?
Thanks! About what Belgian brewers use, yes, that's what I hear. There seems to be confusion in the literature about this. For example, Palmer and Zainasheff both write candi sugar in recipes, claiming that it is more healthy for the yeast. Also, the chemical composition of table sugar varies, AFAIK, from pure sucrose to almost inverted sugar.