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bio website programmer-art.org
location United States
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Nov 12 '12 at 17:34

Feb
12
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
13
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
9
awarded  Scholar
Sep
9
accepted How does efficiency change when adding grains that are normally steeped to a mash?
Sep
9
comment How does efficiency change when adding grains that are normally steeped to a mash?
Wow thanks @mdma for the thorough reply and the link to John Palmer's steeping info. I'm actually working on a calculator similar to Beer Calculus at Malt.io so I'm trying to make sure I properly approximate the GU contribution based on steeping vs. mashing. The Typical Malt Yields table on the same site is particularly useful for seeing the difference for caramel malts when mashed vs. steeped.
Sep
8
asked How does efficiency change when adding grains that are normally steeped to a mash?
Jun
29
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
18
comment All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
Thanks, I will try this out soon and refrain from using tap water for the time being. Also, I'm curious - with many styles of sour beers out there does it really matter if the mash is overly acidic? I mostly see comments about alkalinity causing astringency by extracting tannins, and have yet to see anyone talking about acidity doing the same. Perhaps I haven't looked in the right places?
Jun
18
comment All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
I am not filtering my water. Not sure if I should be.
Jun
18
comment All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
Interesting. I will see what I can come up with, but I'm wondering how other brew-in-a-bag people do it. I see plenty of videos online where they just do BIAB in their pot, take out the grain and turn on the burners for the boil. If this were really my issue wouldn't that cause this flavor for those people?
Jun
18
awarded  Supporter
Jun
18
revised All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
added 201 characters in body
Jun
18
comment All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
I was thinking this may be the culprit, but I'm not sure how to accomplish this without a mash tun. I've tried using the bottling bucket and just leaving the bag in, but either the wort never runs clear or it get clogged up and nothing comes out. Any tips on how to accomplish this without extra equipment to test and see if that's my issue?
Jun
18
awarded  Editor
Jun
18
revised All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
added 201 characters in body
Jun
18
comment All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians
I do not apply any heat during mashing, just wrap in a blanket and lose about 5F over the course of an hour. I can't taste it before bottling, but most of the time I make the mistake of not tasting until after adding the priming sugar. My thought is that the sugar is masking the taste, or I'm just not paying attention. I just can't imagine it's an infection - I've had infections before and burnt is not how I'd describe them, more like sour / funky / moldy instead. Also, I'm priming with plain white table sugar, boiled in a bit of water to sanitize.
Jun
17
awarded  Student
Jun
17
asked All my all-grain batches produce a bitter/astringent, dark, almost burnt off flavor that ruins every batch, from light pilsner to dark belgians