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Jul
28
answered Homebrewing Soda, Safety Concerns
Jul
28
comment Preparing yeast for secondary fermentation
Keep in mind that sweetness can be as much due to lack of hops as fermentation. Also, alcohol adds sweetness, so stronger beers will seem sweeter.
Jul
27
comment Preparing yeast for secondary fermentation
One thing you can do is try a fast ferment test (sometimes called a forced ferment test). That will tell you is it's the wort or the yeast. Take a sample and put it in a container like a jar. Add a LOT of yeast to it...it can even be bread yeast. All we want to do is find out how low that wort will ferment. Leave it in a warm place for a few days, then take a reading again. If it's dropped, you know there's still fermentation to be done. If it hasn't, the beer is finished.
Jul
27
comment Preparing yeast for secondary fermentation
OK, I don't see a lot of unfermentables there in terms of ingredients. The extract will be to some extent, but there's not a lot of that. Nottingham should have no trouble at all dealing with a 1.083 beer. However, since the gravity hasn't fallen further, I really suspect that fermentation is done. I also think that's a fine FG for a 1.083 beer. Is there some particular reason you want it lower or think it should be?
Jul
27
answered Preparing yeast for secondary fermentation
Jul
26
answered Bottle Conditioning with Saison Yeast - Any adjustments to priming sugar necessary?
Jul
26
answered Mash Boiler – What's a good boiler?
Jul
25
answered Which kind of hop should be used on a First Wort Hopped (FWH) beer?
Jul
24
comment Minimal neccesary time in primary/seconday for a barleywine-braggot
This is good basic advice, but keep in mind that the beer dictates the schedule...the calendar doesn't. Take gravity readings and taste the sample afterwards. That's the only way to know for certain.
Jul
23
comment Dynamics temperature measurement
The most important part to me would be to do a blind triangle tasting of a tightly controlled process vs. the normal process. If you can't taste a difference, the temps don't matter.
Jul
23
comment Dynamics temperature measurement
That's very interesting and different from what I've seen. But I haven't tested it to the extent you have. I also wonder how much it really matters in terms of the beer quality.
Jul
23
comment Dynamics temperature measurement
"Varies a lot of degrees"? That certainly hasn't been my experience. When I ferment in my temp controlled chest freezer, the temp is amazingly homogenous throughout the wort
Jul
22
comment Best way to estimate remaining fermentable sugars?
"The important point is, how do you know whether that supposedly stuck beer has any fermentable sugar left? The yeast might have given up early, which is a common enough problem. Or maybe the mash temp was missed by a lot? Or maybe something toxic got into the beer, causing the yeast to die early."....yeast giving up early isn't all that common. You'd have to miss your mash temp by 20F for that to matter. And I don't know of anything toxic that could get in and kill yeast.
Jul
22
answered Best way to estimate remaining fermentable sugars?
Jul
22
comment Yeast Problems!
It wouldn't be too high if you starter at 1.100. But it is too high from 1.056. The questions is "why?". I'd guess you have a highly unfermentable wort, but we'll need to see the recipe and your procedure to know for sure. But if it hasn't changed in 2 weeks, it's highly unlikely that it will change with more yeast.
Jul
21
comment When should I add campden tablets?
Add it to the water before you use it.
Jul
21
comment When should I add campden tablets?
Nope, I'm afraid you were incorrectly informed. Within minutes you'll be fine.
Jul
21
answered When should I add campden tablets?
Jul
20
answered Yeast Problems!
Jul
16
answered What is the best type of ale/lager that you can add fruit to?