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Jan
17
comment Fermentation started, then stopped the next day. Is my yeast dead?
You are right that anaerobic respiration itself converts glucose into 2 molecules of lactic acid, which subsequently during fermentation proper is converted into two molecules of ethanol and two molecules of CO<sub>2</sub>. During aerobic respiration a molecule of glucose is broken down into six molecules of CO<sub>2</sub> and six molecules of water. So it would be more accurate to say each glucose molecule produces three times as much CO<sub>2</sub> during anaerobic respiration as compared to aerobic respiration.
Jan
17
comment Waiting to pitch yeast?
I never noticed a DMS taste in the beer from the person who used this method. However, based on Palmer (howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html) this method of cooling will likely introduce more DMS. Some of it will be trapped on the condensed water on the lid, and thus carefully removing the lid to reduce transfer of water on the lid to the wort might help a bit. Not saying this method is optimal in any way shape or form, but it does work if you are looking for ways to cut time.
Jan
17
awarded  Editor
Jan
17
revised Airlock re-sanitization after minor blow-off
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
17
comment Airlock re-sanitization after minor blow-off
Interesting point never thought of that. Also I guess if you had a large enough pressure differential due to weather could also be an issue. Someone else at my local homebrew store was also worried about drain-back from the hose as well. I have never had a problem with this, but I do see your point I am going to edit my post.
Jan
9
answered Fermentation started, then stopped the next day. Is my yeast dead?
Jan
9
answered Waiting to pitch yeast?
Jan
3
answered Airlock re-sanitization after minor blow-off
Dec
29
awarded  Teacher
Dec
29
answered Is primary fermentation finished?