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seen Jan 28 at 11:54

Sep
21
comment After how long of a boil will LPT1 and other head retention proteins denature?
@Graham Yes indeed. :)
Sep
21
comment After how long of a boil will LPT1 and other head retention proteins denature?
@DennyConn Well, it actually does talk about denatured LPT1.. I think thats where I originally read it. (quote from site) In boiling wort, LTP1 unravels (denatures, in the lingo) and changes shape. So, boiling wort converts LTP1 from a mostly inactive form to a form capable of forming good beer foam.
Sep
21
asked After how long of a boil will LPT1 and other head retention proteins denature?
Sep
21
accepted What number of IBU is standard for some commercial IPAs?
Sep
19
comment What number of IBU is standard for some commercial IPAs?
@denny When you say BU:GU, you mean GU from malt, right? Since for example corn sugar wouldn't leave any residue sweetness? Also: Damn, this is one of those times I wish I could accept multiple answers...
Sep
18
asked What number of IBU is standard for some commercial IPAs?
Sep
15
comment What are the effects of storing hops in the freezer?
@brew Two months of storage. Maybe 30% is alot, I'm just looking for general best practices. I mean, most if not all brewers must surely face this problem sometime... It standard practice to simply use them as ordinary?
Sep
15
comment How to clean yeast
@PMV It would probably work fine if you made a small starter every two months or so, with oxygen-rich water and some yeast nutrient. This will produce fresh cells. You then repeat the above process.
Sep
15
asked What are the effects of storing hops in the freezer?
Sep
7
comment What does high attentuation actually mean in terms of types of sugar fermented?
@brewchez Agreed. I'm mainly just trying to understand the chemistry behind the fermentation process, not particularly what the label says - question should probably been stated as Does different yeast strains ferment different types of sugar?
Sep
7
accepted What does high attentuation actually mean in terms of types of sugar fermented?
Sep
7
comment Non fermenting cider
@Jug read this: homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/4673/beer-not-carbonating. Might give you some more tips.
Sep
7
answered Avoiding excessive soot on brew kettles
Sep
6
comment Non fermenting cider
@Jug Just sanity checking.. You did prime it right? :D Must be extremely frustrating. I've never added yeast to bottles before, but I believe it would be much the same thing as pitching as usual. Probably easier with dry yeast, pop a few granulates into each bottle. If you use liquid yeast, make a small starter to invigorate it then add a bit to each bottle. It might also be worth it's own question on this site! Only found this: homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/1540/…
Sep
2
awarded  Commentator
Sep
2
comment Non fermenting cider
@Jug It's hard to say.. What temperature is it in your basement? Higher temperature might induce activity, but it won't help if the yeast is dead. Try rousing the yeast by putting the bottles upside down (so any settled yeast is brought into suspension) and put it a little warmer. It's a pain if you need to open all bottles and add more yeast!
Aug
30
awarded  Scholar
Aug
30
accepted Should a wine be encouraged to emit residual CO2 before bottlings?
Aug
29
awarded  Student
Aug
29
comment What does high attentuation actually mean in terms of types of sugar fermented?
So it is a rough estimate of how many of the different sugars that can be fermented by a specific yeast as well as the make-up in a standard wort between those sugars? Am I right in thinking that if a yeast can ferment a specific sugar, it will ferment it completely?