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Sep
16
comment Pomegranate wine colour?
My suspicion is that a "milky pink" wine will never be dark red, even after clarification. You might hope for dark pink or light red. So, I don't think I've answered the question about how to make a dark, red pomegranate wine.
Sep
15
comment Pomegranate wine colour?
There's a good primer at Winemaker Magazine
Sep
15
comment What unit does my hydrometer show?
I'm confused -- how did you read 80 before fermentation, when the highest number on the scale is 50? Is there a different scale on the other side?
Sep
15
comment Pomegranate wine colour?
Given time, the solids in the wine will drop out and it won't appear milky any more. It will also appear darker as there's less light being reflected. You can speed the process by adding finings.
Sep
15
comment What unit does my hydrometer show?
If those are gravity points, it's a narrow range hydrometer; it only goes up to 50. I'd guess that the units are Brix or zplato.
Sep
5
comment Where to add the sugar before bottling?
Even if you're not planning on transferring the beer to a carboy for secondary, make sure you give the beer enough time to truly finish. For regular strength (e.g. up to 1.060 starting gravity), two or three weeks is good assuming you're fermenting at close to room temperature.
Aug
28
comment Wild hop alpha acid
You might want to confirm that the hops you found are not ornamental hops which will provide little bitterness or aroma. I would try making a tea by steeping the hops in boiling water for 30 minutes or so and then evaluate the aroma.
Aug
15
comment Mashing raw spelt/dinkel
For the StackExchange model to work, you're better off posting each questions separately...
Aug
10
comment Should you adjust residual sweetness to account for carbonation level in a beer?
I wonder if the carbonic acid is formng a salt? A carbonate or bicarbonate would account for the salty flavor, but not the added bitterness.
Aug
7
comment Is a yeast-starter without temperature control worse than no yeast-starter at all?
This is not an answer to your question, so I'm putting it as a comment. The temperature of your yeast starter should not play a role in the ester formation in the larger batch of beer. If you're not doing this already, cold-crash the starter for 24-48 hours before pitching. This will force the yeast to drop out of suspension. You can then decant and throw away the starter beer, which may be estery, and pitch just the yeast.
Aug
2
comment How high in ABV can a beer be before the yeast is too stressed to re-use?
Coincidentally I just read this today. The author attempted to harvest the yeast from a bottle-conditioned 11% ABV beer. He was not able to culture the yeast due to the cells being non-viable.
Jul
19
comment First Time Airlock Won't Start
Yup. Like Denny said, wait a couple weeks, then take a gravity reading. I expect the beer will be fine.
Jul
18
comment Why does gravity increase between pre-boil and pitching?
The recipe is making some assumptions about the rate of boil-off, which may or may not be accurate for your setup. My system boils off around 1 gallon of water each hour. If I'm boiling 6 gallons for one hour this equates to a 1/6 = 17% increase in gravity. If I boil 2 gallons for one hour, it's a 1/2 = 50% increase in gravity.
Jul
17
comment How far to insert stopper in carboy?
I also find that Star San makes it hard to get stoppers to stay in place.
Jul
16
comment Murky beer, no bubbles in airlock?
I've edited the answer to emphasize that airlock activity cannot be used as an indicator for fermentation.
Jul
16
comment Murky beer, no bubbles in airlock?
@Denny Did I mention bubbles in the airlock in my answer? I suggested he look for a ring of krausen as evidence that the fermentation had finished. I also suggested he take a sample for gravity, but with the proviso that it introduces a small risk of contamination.
Jul
16
comment Pitched Yeast at 80-85 deg. Problem?
Those temperatures (72 for ale, 65 for lager) are higher than recommended. Although most ale yeasts specify a temperature range up to 70 F., you'll make much better beer if you keep the temperature near the bottom of the range -- closer to 60 F. Lager yeasts vary in their recommended temperatures, but 55 F. is about the highest you could get away with. 65 F. is much too high for any lager yeast except for California common.
Jul
4
comment What's the amount of psi a 5 gallon water bottle can hold?
What do you mean by "compressor"? Normally, a CO2 tank is used to carbonate the beer and provide pressure for dispensing. Is this what you're using, or is it something different?
Jun
29
comment What is the effect of conversion efficiency on your brew?
Great answer, but I wanted to stress that while absolute efficiency is not important, knowing the efficiency of your setup is. If you know your efficiency, recipe formulation becomes a lot simpler as you know how much grain to mash to achieve the desired original gravity.
Jun
27
comment Hop extract substitution
@mdma no wisdom. I just plugged the numbers into the linked calculator.