3,927 reputation
724
bio website scottymiller.net
location Maryland
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen yesterday

Home brewer for several years


1d
comment Pediococcus Infection--Will brett get rid of the ropiness?
Recently read Michael Tonsmeire's book on sour beers. Influenced me to wax poetic about the wonders of sour beer brewing.
Aug
20
comment Pediococcus Infection--Will brett get rid of the ropiness?
A photo would help. Do you taste buttery/butterscotch? That's a dead-ringer that it's Pediococcus. Lactobacillus won't produce as much of that flavor. Pedio also may make beer sick/viscous/snotty in consistency. Got any of that?
Jul
30
comment Should dry hopped beer be lightly stirred prior to bottling?
You're welcome.
Jul
30
comment Should dry hopped beer be lightly stirred prior to bottling?
For what it's worth, hops inhibit the growth of lactobacillus and pediococcus, two of the most common contaminants that will spoil your beer. By that logic, IPAs are going to theoretically be pretty safe from contamination. You seem like you're pretty conscious about sanitation, I'd be surprised if you ran into problems in this regard.
Jul
26
comment Using spent grains to smoke meat
Not entirely certain if this is a question with a verifiable answer that is suited for this site, but I'll be damned if I don't try this next time I fire up the smoker! The amount of steam/smoke the grains would produce would certainly add a level of depth to meat you otherwise wouldn't get.
Jul
21
comment Cascade hops high alpha acid
Who was the provider/seller of the hops? Where did it say they were 10%?
Jul
21
comment Specialty Grains, To boil or not to boil
Seconding Denny, absolutely do not boil the grains in a partial mash.
Jul
17
comment Peach Wit- extract flavoring or not
Are you force carbonating or bottle conditioning?
Jul
17
comment Pumpkin Ale: what to expect?
Sorry to hear it. I've dumped a few kegs after letting them sit for months in the keezer as well. Live and learn!
Jul
13
comment How to bottle new brew properly
Certainly is another way of doing it. I've heard of inconsistent bottle carbonation even when using Denny's technique. Simple answer is, just make sure your beer is sufficiently stirred when you add the sugar.
May
21
comment Thermal expansion of wort
Are you accounting for the proteins and trub left in the bottom of your kettle when you go to rack out of your boil kettle for fermentation? If not that, are you using an immersion chiller? That would displace wort if you measured while it was in the kettle.
May
20
comment Gluten Free Brewing with Sorghum Extract
I almost always sample my beers as time progresses. For me, I have a bucket filled with a star san solution. I dunk my thief in there to sanitize it. I draw a sample into a graduated cylinder to take a hydrometer reading. I'd recommend in the summer months to draw a sample, and put the stopper back on after drawing to ensure no critters fly in (I have fruit flies all over) and contaminate your beer. If you're bug free (as I am in the winter), you probably don't have to be as concerned.
May
20
comment Thermal expansion of wort
I don't know the formula, but I can gather that it is a very complex one given heat, quantity, density of sugars in the solution, even the height and diameter of your boil kettle, not to mention any modifications made to the inside (ridge along the bottom, submerged immersion chiller, etc). Heck, I'd imagine one would even have to take into consideration the barometric pressure of your given altitude.
May
5
comment Is this wort infected? (*Picture)
You're welcome. We are reaching warmer temperatures around this time of the year, which means there's greater potential for more airborne contaminants to mess with you. One thing to consider is your post-boil chilling time. It's needs to be quick, and it needs to be covered as best as possible. Fruit flies and other contaminants are going to love to fly near/into sweet wort and carry with them whatever bacteria that would harm your beer. The other thing you can control that can limit this is a short lag time in fermentation. Proper aeration, yeast nutrient, and yeast health is vital.
May
5
comment Consecutive (lacto?) infections with different fermenters
I've noticed trends where a lot more hoppy styles of beers tend to form infections less than low-IBU styles. I rarely ever see an infected IPA, for instance, where as German Wheat styles are more common.
May
5
comment Consecutive (lacto?) infections with different fermenters
I've brewed several 100% Brett ales, including IPAs, Saisons, Berlinner Weisse, etc, and as far as my experience goes, I've never seen a pellicle form from using Brett. If I ever saw a pellicle, I would assume either Lacto or Pedio (or Acetobacter if extremely unfortunate).
Apr
25
comment What type of Yeast can withstand high gravity beers?
Amylase enzyme (aka beano) is a tricky one. If you want to bottle your beer, it will add at least 1-2 months to your maturation before you can bottle your beer without turning it all into bottle bombs. If you're kegging, big-whoop (one of my four beers on tap has it in it). If you do decide to use it, I would recommend getting a yeast starter going, of a similar gravity as the pre-fermented wort, with the same yeast, and pitch a tsp of it into the starter, then pitching the starter into your beer at the 24-48 hour mark when it's at "high krausen".
Apr
24
comment What type of Yeast can withstand high gravity beers?
At this point yeast nutrient isn't going to help you. It would have benefited from a tsp during the boil, but obviously it's well past that. At this point, I'd recommend searching this site for stuck fermentations and using some of the techniques found to fix this batch.
Apr
24
comment What type of Yeast can withstand high gravity beers?
I'm hedging my bets on unfermentable extract mixed with lack of aeration. Read more about aeration in the question: When is aeration good and/or bad in homebrewing?.
Apr
24
comment What type of Yeast can withstand high gravity beers?
Any idea how old the yeast is? Was this part of a kit, and if so, is there a date anywhere on it? Did you aerate the wort before you added the yeast (this is very important).