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seen Sep 8 at 3:53

Jan
14
comment Why use Oxygen tanks to aerate wort, what are the benefits?
I admit this is getting into terminology nit-picking, however, Oxygen itself is an oxidiser. The fuel you use with your oxy torch (Acetylene?) is flammable. I certainly did not intend to downplay your caution, as pure oxygen is indeed dangerous in the presence of combustible materials and an ignition source.
Jan
14
comment Why use Oxygen tanks to aerate wort, what are the benefits?
Just a minor point about the caution - oxygen itself isn't flammable, but its presence will certainly increase the potential for other flammable/combustible gas or materials to ignite.
Jun
11
comment How big of a Noob am I? Or, What to Do when You spill a stir-bar in your 5-gallon bucket
Good answer. The only thing I'd add is that whilst you can leave the stir bar in the fermenter, it's a good idea to retrieve it (using the magnet method) while you're thinking about it. Otherwise, you risk forgetting about it and dumping the magnet with your trub/yeast.
Apr
9
comment Why is my attenuation so low?
How confident are you in your thermometer for measuring mash temp? A few degrees out could put you into less-fermentable mash profile territory. Also, racking the beer off that early wouldn't have helped the situation. If you're pitching new yeast at that point, it really should be actively fermenting as the conditions are less than ideal for aclimatising. Next time, I'd definitely leave the beer on the yeast longer, and possibly ramp the temp up towards the end to encourage the yeast to finish the job and clean-up.
Apr
3
comment Pros and cons of a conical fermentor
Yep, fermenting in a keg would be very similar. Just added another pro of being able to dump trub & break material before pitching. You could probably do that in a keg too. I'd argue you could get a cleaner harvest from the conical, but at a home brewing level, it's probably not that big a deal.
Mar
12
comment Estimating final alcohol by Original Gravity
MalFet's answer is good, but at the end of the day, it's still an estimate and open to a reasonable error range. If you have experience in tasting beers, you may be able to draw on that to work out whether the estimated FG is in the ballpark. However, if you don't have much room for error, you should buy a hydrometer and actually measure the FG.
Mar
7
comment Peanut Butter Chocolate Stout- Cocoa or Nibs?
Thanks, I've not seen or heard of powdered peanut butter before - I'll have to keep an eye out for it!
Jan
14
comment Oxyclean safe inside the bottle
+1 for the answer, -1 for the reasoning!
Oct
15
comment Can I use liquid nitrogen to cool my wort?
More information about no chilling at: aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/… . There are some things to keep in mind when going down that route (such as timings of hop additions) and it may not be the most ideal way of chilling, but it is certainly possible to brew award-winning beers using this method.
Oct
12
comment Can I use liquid nitrogen to cool my wort?
I understand the potential for worry about water consumption, but I would be surprised if the amout of water used to generate the energy that goes into the process of obtaining liquid nitrogen would be any less! Never mind the hazards of handling liquid nitrogen. I would much sooner use the "no-chill" method, or look at ways to reclaim and reuse the water from chilling.
Oct
11
comment How do you harvest yeast from a commercial beer?
In addition to making sure there's yeast to capture, also realise that some beers are filtered prior to bottle conditioning and primed with a different yeast (eg, a more flocculant yeast), so make sure you know exactly which yeast you're harvesting!
Sep
12
comment Yeast, CO2 Toxicity with mead and beer
Good point about the oxygenation and the stage of fermentation - I've edited my answer accordingly.
Aug
8
comment Yeast, CO2 Toxicity with mead and beer
Similar question at homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/2114/…
Jan
4
comment Added yeast to boiling water
Yes, in hindsight, I probably wouldn't use baker's yeast (although, it might be a good experiment!) and I certainly don't recommend it as a viable option. My last resort would be more like what brewchez suggests (I no-chill in a cube anyway, which, among having back-up dried yeast, is why I've never faced this problem before).
Jan
3
comment Added yeast to boiling water
I understand the sentiment, but with that little yeast, I can't fathom there would be enough to stave off any significant bacteria or wild yeast anyway. Nevermind the massive underpitch likely leading to associated off flavours. I was mainly trying to emphasise that a new pitch would be a far better option than the alternative. Having not been in that situation before, I can only guess I would be trying all the shops and fellow brewers I could find to get some more yeast, possibly using bakers' yeast as a last resort! Cheers.
Jan
3
comment Added yeast to boiling water
+1 on not throwing it out and using a new pitch of yeast, -1 on trying to propogate enough yeast from whatever is left over from the original pitch.
Aug
24
comment Why do you aerate wort at first and try to keep oxygen out later?
Do you mean "Having the yeast metabolizing aerobically at first..."?
Dec
14
comment Calculating Alcohol by Volume
Yeah, it's definitely just an approximation (answer edited to emphasise this). I use brewing software for working out actual ABV, but this is good for getting a ball-park figure if you don't have a calculator handy. Using the plot that you generated, you could probably come up with a good correction factor to apply for better accuracy.
Nov
24
comment Why is our Original Gravity low?
If it's constantly low, you should also check your hydrometer (assuming that's what you're using to measure SG) to make sure the paper scale inside hasn't slipped.
Nov
18
comment Do you keep your wine/beer making records online?
+1 for Google Docs spreadsheet. It may not be as fancy as other software, but the simplicity makes it very easy to customise to your preferences and the way you like to work instead of changing the way you work to suit something else.