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seen Jul 22 at 9:42

Jan
14
comment Why use Oxygen tanks to aerate wort, what are the benefits?
I admit this is getting into terminology nit-picking, however, Oxygen itself is an oxidiser. The fuel you use with your oxy torch (Acetylene?) is flammable. I certainly did not intend to downplay your caution, as pure oxygen is indeed dangerous in the presence of combustible materials and an ignition source.
Jan
14
comment Why use Oxygen tanks to aerate wort, what are the benefits?
Just a minor point about the caution - oxygen itself isn't flammable, but its presence will certainly increase the potential for other flammable/combustible gas or materials to ignite.
Jun
11
comment How big of a Noob am I? Or, What to Do when You spill a stir-bar in your 5-gallon bucket
Good answer. The only thing I'd add is that whilst you can leave the stir bar in the fermenter, it's a good idea to retrieve it (using the magnet method) while you're thinking about it. Otherwise, you risk forgetting about it and dumping the magnet with your trub/yeast.
Apr
9
comment Why is my attenuation so low?
How confident are you in your thermometer for measuring mash temp? A few degrees out could put you into less-fermentable mash profile territory. Also, racking the beer off that early wouldn't have helped the situation. If you're pitching new yeast at that point, it really should be actively fermenting as the conditions are less than ideal for aclimatising. Next time, I'd definitely leave the beer on the yeast longer, and possibly ramp the temp up towards the end to encourage the yeast to finish the job and clean-up.
Apr
3
answered Why shouldn't we just use scales?
Apr
3
comment Pros and cons of a conical fermentor
Yep, fermenting in a keg would be very similar. Just added another pro of being able to dump trub & break material before pitching. You could probably do that in a keg too. I'd argue you could get a cleaner harvest from the conical, but at a home brewing level, it's probably not that big a deal.
Apr
3
revised Pros and cons of a conical fermentor
Trub/break dump point added
Apr
3
answered Pros and cons of a conical fermentor
Mar
12
comment Estimating final alcohol by Original Gravity
MalFet's answer is good, but at the end of the day, it's still an estimate and open to a reasonable error range. If you have experience in tasting beers, you may be able to draw on that to work out whether the estimated FG is in the ballpark. However, if you don't have much room for error, you should buy a hydrometer and actually measure the FG.
Mar
7
comment Peanut Butter Chocolate Stout- Cocoa or Nibs?
Thanks, I've not seen or heard of powdered peanut butter before - I'll have to keep an eye out for it!
Mar
6
answered Peanut Butter Chocolate Stout- Cocoa or Nibs?
Jan
16
answered BJCP Category for a Black Witbier
Jan
14
comment Oxyclean safe inside the bottle
+1 for the answer, -1 for the reasoning!
Dec
7
revised Is it Possible to Collect Too Much Volume From Mash Tun?
Add basic summary of linked resources
Dec
7
answered Is it Possible to Collect Too Much Volume From Mash Tun?
Nov
15
awarded  Yearling
Oct
15
comment Can I use liquid nitrogen to cool my wort?
More information about no chilling at: aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/… . There are some things to keep in mind when going down that route (such as timings of hop additions) and it may not be the most ideal way of chilling, but it is certainly possible to brew award-winning beers using this method.
Oct
12
comment Can I use liquid nitrogen to cool my wort?
I understand the potential for worry about water consumption, but I would be surprised if the amout of water used to generate the energy that goes into the process of obtaining liquid nitrogen would be any less! Never mind the hazards of handling liquid nitrogen. I would much sooner use the "no-chill" method, or look at ways to reclaim and reuse the water from chilling.
Oct
11
awarded  Commentator
Oct
11
comment How do you harvest yeast from a commercial beer?
In addition to making sure there's yeast to capture, also realise that some beers are filtered prior to bottle conditioning and primed with a different yeast (eg, a more flocculant yeast), so make sure you know exactly which yeast you're harvesting!