1,254 reputation
318
bio website
location Brooklyn, NY
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Dec 1 at 20:01

PhD student and part-time developer. Member of the New York City Homebrewers Guild. My favorite styles are American ales.


Apr
23
comment yeast starter, always a good addition?
Are you talking about liquid or dry yeast? It's generally unnecessary with dry yeast.
Apr
2
comment Cleaning Inside of Racking Cane
Good to know. My first auto-siphon developed cracks in it within a year. A lot of people on forums say it's caused by hot water. Since then I haven't used hot water and haven't had a problem (yet). Maybe they use different plastic in other racking canes, like the one you have, and it's more heat resistant.
Mar
31
comment Cleaning Inside of Racking Cane
Just be careful with the temperature of the water. Percarbonate dissolves best when the water is 140°F or higher, but the plastic they use in a lot of racking canes (esp. the auto-siphon) will begin to get cracks in it very quickly if you clean it with hot water. You can use a percarbonate cleaner if you let the water cool down, or do a long soak (several hours) in warm, but not hot water. In the warm water, the cleaner will eventually dissolve.
Mar
26
comment Could someone provide info. about brewing salts?
amazon.com/Water-Comprehensive-Brewers-Brewing-Elements/dp/…
Mar
4
comment Is a yeast starter required for this recipe
It would be best if you included the target OG and the recipe link in the actual text/body of your question, for future reference and ease of readability. The question only makes sense with respect to the link you included. You also can't count on that link existing permanently.
Mar
4
comment How much CO2 should I expect to use up when force carbonating?
You also have to account for CO2 used for serving and keeping it carbed while serving since more CO2 goes in when beer comes out. IME this uses up a noticeable amount of CO2 also.
Feb
21
comment Is there a heath issue using Irish Moss aka Carrageenan in beer making?
Awesome thank you.
Feb
21
comment Is there a heath issue using Irish Moss aka Carrageenan in beer making?
No I don't, but that's why I didn't post an answer to myself. It's a hard question to answer with evidence and citations, and I don't have time to research it right now either unfortunately. But I have read this well-researched report - cornucopia.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/… - which makes it clear that carrageenan is a controversial ingredient that deserves a lot more attention and research than it has gotten considering that there is some evidence of ill effects even in small quantities and it's very widely used.
Feb
21
comment How to brew all-grain indoors
check this out homebrewtalk.com/f39/easy-stovetop-all-grain-brewing-pics-90132 - it's basically stove-top brew-in-a-bag (BIAB) though he doesn't call it that. I've done this though, makes great beer.
Feb
21
comment So I want to make a summer shandy, can I just put fruit in the second fermentation stage instead of juice?
@WayneInYak Agreed. That's also what it says on Wikipedia. But if you go to any pub in the UK, where the drink named "shandy" comes from, and you ask for a shandy, you're going to get lemon soda and lager. The point of it is usually so you can have something that tastes like beer and not get drunk. They're pretty commonly ordered at work lunches or similar situations.
Feb
21
comment Is there a heath issue using Irish Moss aka Carrageenan in beer making?
You should include some of the citations from the article in here.
Feb
21
comment Is there a heath issue using Irish Moss aka Carrageenan in beer making?
Even if you were a scientist, you should at least link to some evidence for this, as the poster asks specifically for "specific independent research or information online".
Feb
21
comment Is there a heath issue using Irish Moss aka Carrageenan in beer making?
I realize you have a high reputation are a well-known homebrewer, but how do you know this to be true? Unless you can show that it's been lab-tested, it's at least rational to think that if you add some carrageenan to your beer you might then consume that carrageenan later if you don't filter it out. I understand how it works and that in theory it settles out, but it seems possible that 100% does not settle out - i.e. some of it is consumed, and no one knows how safe it is, esp. for people with IBS or other GI issues.
Feb
21
comment Is there a heath issue using Irish Moss aka Carrageenan in beer making?
This is a controversial issue, so I'd be wary of any advice you get on here or anywhere else, unless it cites studies, and even then I'd be wary. It's like asking if it's safe to use a plastic cooler as a mash tun. No one really knows if it's safe but tens of thousands of people do it. If you are worried about it, just leave it out. It's a purely aesthetic thing and there are other ways of clarifying beer.
Feb
21
comment So I want to make a summer shandy, can I just put fruit in the second fermentation stage instead of juice?
A shandy is really lemon soda mixed with beer (like 7up or Sprite). They call lemon soda lemonade in the UK, where the drink drink comes from. In the US lemonade is something different, in particular it's not carbonated. If you add it during fermentation you're not making shandy, you're making something else.
Feb
15
comment What are the most and least competitive categories in BJCP sanctioned competitions?
I changed the question. It's not really subjective anymore, numbers/statistics should answer it. You could add facts or expert opinions about why this is the case, but that is not necessary to answer the question.
Feb
12
comment Is Wyeast American Ale II a highly flocculant yeast strain?
Cold crashing does not really have to do with how long it should sit. You cold crash when it's done fermenting or it's reached your desired FG. If not cold crashing, you bottle or keg when it's done. Same time. Depends on the beer, but for IPAs 5-7% ABV, two weeks fermenting and two weeks conditioning is generally enough in my experience. Three-four weeks conditioning is often better (so five-six weeks total). The only way you know for sure if fermentation is complete is with gravity readings (e.g. two hydrometer readings 24+ hrs apart and it stays the same). Or if you hit your target FG.
Feb
12
comment How do I cut my extract brewing cost?
You can also explore lower ABV styles, which will have less malt in them - milds, bitters, dry irish stout can all be under 4% and still carry a lot of flavor.
Feb
11
comment Stuck fermentation - Should I be concerned?
Beers sometimes don't attenuate all the way for a variety of reasons. It's a common problem. But 51% is very low. I would wait a few more days though, 14 days minimum on an ale like this. You may be able to get it to go a little further warming it up, swirling it around or adding more yeast. Try to control temp. The cause may mean that you can't go any further (bad pH for yeast, a lot of unfermentables in there, etc). homebrew.stackexchange.com/search?q=stuck+fermentation homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/attenuation howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-1.html
Feb
11
comment Where to buy ingredients and tools for brewing in UK?
You may want to specify the city you're moving to. There are local brick & mortar shops in many cities in the UK.