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seen Mar 17 '12 at 20:16

Feb
22
comment Why an all grain stops at 1.030 when there are an abundance of champagne yeast
Looked up the Beano deal and tried it. Happily, the grav is down to 1.010 and lowering after 3 days. Another tool in the kit. Thanks, mdma.
Feb
17
comment Why an all grain stops at 1.030 when there are an abundance of champagne yeast
I wanted a very dry, almost rye whiskey taste, without distilling (illegal for me here in the US). I'll try the Beano. This is turning into a biochemistry experiment (not that I mind as a chemist :-)) Thanks mdma, you are contributing to my education on all-grain brewing.
Feb
17
comment Why an all grain stops at 1.030 when there are an abundance of champagne yeast
Starting gravity was 1.030 before I raised the SG to 1.070 before pitching. I used champagne yeast because of the high sugar content and high desired ending abv. Thanks to all that comment as I am learning this process.
Feb
15
comment Is clarifying while fermenting a problem?
Thanks for the link. I'm just learning this whole-grain brewing thing. It is a lot different than the ciders and wines that I am used to doing. Thanks again.
Feb
15
comment Is clarifying while fermenting a problem?
It tastes ok right now as a beer, just a little sweet (not certain what to call it). May just borrow the bottling gun and force carbonate it to bottle instead of priming it further (don't think that would work anyway because it sounds like the yeast are done already). Thanks.
Feb
14
comment All-grain Rye beer clarifying suggestions needed
Hey Denny, just found a reference to your sparging page at dennybrew. Didn't realize I had been communicating with a brewmeister :-) all this time.
Nov
1
comment How best to clarify when wheat beer yeast used
Hey Denny, since I don't do many beers, would gelatin effect the taste? I know it doesn't for meads and ciders (I've used gelatin on these with no effect other than reduced cloudiness). I hate to suggest something that I don't know from personal experience to be acceptable.
Nov
1
comment Which sweeteners are good
Sadly, this season wasn't good for cactus pears. They are an unusual fruit that has blood red pulp and are similar to taste to a kiwi. I'm told that they have been used to make something similar to tequila and mesqual.
Nov
1
comment How can tobacco be used in beer?
We routinely cook salmon on cedar planks on the grill here in the NW, so I don't think that you have anything to worry about. But, I'd look for non-cedar boxes (most are basswood, but not that common) to focus on the cigar smell.
Oct
29
comment How can tobacco be used in beer?
I don't read Italian, so can you say where you bought it, hopefully in the US?
Oct
29
comment Should I upgrade my thermometer or just re-calibrate it?
The best way is to get some dry ice and cool it until all of the alcohol is in the bulb. We only heated them when we didn't have some dry ice or liquid nitrogen around. The trick is to stop cooling just as the alcohol goes into the bulb.
Oct
28
comment Should I upgrade my thermometer or just re-calibrate it?
We just heat them until the alcohol forms a continuous line from bulb to top, to remove "bubbles". But you want to heat them slowly, as pj warns.
Oct
27
comment Is it necessary to heat honey when using it in cider?
Pasteurization is done in commercial honey to remove small crystals that will accelerate the solidification of the honey if not removed. Crystallized honey is more likely to spoil (ferment). Unless Dale is getting his honey from a farmer's market, it has most likely been pasteurized, but not to remove yeast and bacteria, though most (except the Clostridium botulinum spores) are killed during the process. see forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/bees/msg052259046537.html for example.
Oct
27
comment Is it necessary to heat honey when using it in cider?
This is what I do with both honey and sorghum when adjusting the OG.
Oct
13
comment Lots of trub affecting specific gravity readings?
Suspended particles do (what I wrote) and non-suspended particles don't (what Denny wrote). The key is the use of the word trub that normally refers to unsuspended particles. Adding matter to a volume of a liquid increases its density and therefore its specific gravity. So the issue as I thought you were asking is not if the trub effected your FG (what Denny is referring to) but would what becomes trub effect your SG. If this is what you were indeed asking, the answer is yes it can.
Oct
13
comment My mead is too sweet and stopped bubbling. Recommendations?
Thanks for the link, Atom. Since I teach chemistry, I'm always looking for cheaper sources of equipment.
Oct
13
comment My mead is too sweet and stopped bubbling. Recommendations?
Or another potential method (based on what I know as a chemist and a decent chef) would be to melt the chocolate and slowly add everclear or good vodka until "soupy" at room temp, then add this to your mead. Two advantages: choco won't settle out and you up the ABV in the process :-). But I haven't tried this one yet in mead :-) (have used it to make a bittersweet spiked choco eggnog).
Oct
13
comment My mead is too sweet and stopped bubbling. Recommendations?
chocolate is soluble in alcohol to some extent (you've probably seen chocowine before). The choco mead that I had was warmed and blended while warm with melted choco (start the mead in the blender at high speed, then very slowly add the liquid chocolate as a thin stream to insure mixing, until the mixture is at the desired balance of sweetness and choco flavor, doesn't take much using high cacao choco). The other method uses choco nibs (These are bitter with intense choco flavor) in a secondary and letting the mead age over the nibs for several weeks (was on a tour of a meadery in CO).
Oct
13
comment How do you blend your meads/wines?
Not really (threshold). I'm a chemistry prof and what I wrote above is the science. Brewchez is correct in the comment about layering. Layering shots is a prime example of the effect of spec grav, but in what you are asking doesn't apply. Elevated temps increase the ability of the molecules to mix and stay in solution.
Oct
13
comment How do you blend your meads/wines?
Temperature control is the key. Keeping the temp between 70 and 100 F for a short time will avoid any negative effects. These temps are well below the boiling point of the flavenoids that give the mead/wine flavor.