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1

I agree that it's hard to say, but in general you have a long time. I have had lagers at 35F for 2 months and they carbed fine with no need for more yeast.


1

It is hard to generalise as Evil Zymurgist says. You are best off checking the number of yest per ml, with a haemocytometer and a microscope if you have such devices available. As long as you have ~100,000/ml then you will be good to bottle condition most ales with those in suspension. If you have less than this then best to add a little extra. Also, if you ...


2

It's hard to say an exact or even a close general time. If the whole fermentation hasn't gone more than a month or so you may still have enough yeast in suspension. Typically if the mead or beer is very clear it won't have enough yeast to condition. Cold crashing or other finings will drastically reduce your chances of good bottle conditioning. I'm ...


1

Rain water can be very close to RO or distilled. Rain is usually triggered by a solid particle (dust) and or atmospheric compression. Then as it falls it's collecting other particles from the air. Then again picking up particles from the collector. I would have it tested not only for safety to identify potential contamniates but also to establish your ...


3

You probably want to get the water tested to ensure it is fit for human consumption. The rain itself should be fine, but the roof surface and storage vessels may not made of food grade/food safe materials. Here is a list of water testing labs from the NZ MoH: http://www.drinkingwater.esr.cri.nz/mohlabs/labsfornzregionalpha.asp?NZRegion=NZNZ01 For Auckland ...


2

If the air is really clean, you have this part covered. But is it? It is not only about how clean it is where you live - that is, in your area, near ground level. Is it clean up to 2000 feet? Was it clean where water evaporated? What was in the air on the way? Start from reading about acid rains. And there is much more about this topic. Too much to put here. ...


1

I wouldn't risk piching your expired yeast for a kolsch, this is a style that should have very low, subtle to no yeast esters. Your old yeast may be still have a partial viable cell count, but it would produce too many growth esters for the style. If this was a style that has strong ester profile (belgian, wiezen etc). I would pitch the old yeast in hopes ...


1

I would just keep it refrigerated. If your new yeast are to arrive in two or three days, it'll be faster than testing old one. And assuming old one is dead, keeping wort at fermentation temperature is far worse than keeping it refrigerated. It's already chilled, keep it that way. What I would try to do, and I hope you did if it was possible, would be to ...


1

I would take some of the wort and make a starter with the yeast. If the yeast is good it should start fermenting sometime in the first 24 hours. If it doesn't I would throw it in the drain and wait for the new yeast to arrive.


1

ABV is Alcohol By Volume. Carbonation does not change the volume. So it would not effect the ABV. c02 is dissolved into the liquid. Meaning that the c02 molecules fit in between the liquid molecules and do not change the total volume of the liquid. As long as the c02 is trapped the liquid volume is unchanged, once released (bubbles) the gas displaces liquid ...


1

At that elevation you're only about 4 psi lower than sea level. While it would seem wort wouldn't hold oxygen as well for the yeast at that elevation I think it's negligible. You can always add more oxygen if the yeast seems slugish, but I would stop once you know alcohol is present. Sounds more like the yeast is stressed from poor nutients, health, or ...


3

I have tested this personally and have not been able to record any perceivable differences in SG readings. Sometimes degassing will invigorate a slow ferment but nothing more than a good stir would. I do see your math behind the ABV increase and I still believe that to be true as well. Degassing is something you should be doing throughout primary and into ...


1

As a rule of thumb, I work on 1 gram of dried yeast per litre of wort. Has worked for me for the past 3 years. When using packets of yeast, I would simply sprinkle a whole 11.5 gram packet into my 10 litres of wort. Last year I purchased a 500gram package of S-04, so I simply measure out on my digital scales 10 grams of yeast per 10 litre brew. There is ...



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