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2

Based on my experience, you'll have more than enough yeast to carb. I've lagered beer for 2-3 months and still had plenty. If you really feel that you need to add yeast, any neutral yeast will be fine. I tend to use US05 becasue it's inexpensive, easy and reliable. You use so little that it has no effect on flavor, so you don't need a lager yeast.


2

In theory you could reuse yeast forever, that's how breweries were supposed work before the first pure yeast strains were isolated by Carlsberg. But...that probably only works in locations favorable to the yeast (especially certain areas of Belgium), and with continuous brewing happening to keep the yeast in log-phase growth. In reality, most of this beer ...


4

The honest answer is: There's no black and white answer to this. Reason being that yeast is a living micro-organism, making it very difficult (especially on the homebrewer's scale/budget) to measure these sorts of things. Oh, and also every yeast is different in so many ways, one of which being alcohol tolerance and it's effects on yeast health. I've ...


2

All fruit has naturally occurring yeast on the skin. This is almost certainly why your strawberry wine starting fermenting spontaneously. Some winemakers (but not me!) prefer to let the wild yeast on the grape skins ferment the juice. More information here.


0

You probably want to make sure that you put equal amount of sugar in each bottle... I guess, the best way is to use a syringe.


1

Before I switched to kegs, the easiest and most reliable method I found was to siphon off some of the beer (typically a litre or so), warm it in a saucepan, and dissolve the appropriate amount of priming sugar. I used dextrose or some other invert sugar since it seems more likely to ferment out thoroughly, and less likely to impart off flavors. Of course I ...


8

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


1

Rack your beer out of the fermenter into a sanitised bottling bucket, which could just be another fermenter, where the beer is evenly mixed with all your priming sugar before being bottled straight from there. Normally the under / over carbonation issue is caused by differing amounts of priming sugar added to each bottle when priming the bottle ...


2

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...


-1

There is a chart that provides this info. I use sugar cubes for consistency. ...


1

If you freeze and add sugar later ... remember that it could start to ferment again.


1

As a long-time practitioner of this method, I'd recommend waiting longer than this article suggests. For me, the real benefit of the technique is an accelerated reduction of diacetyl at the end of fermentation, since by the time esters have maxed out (more on that below) pretty much all other potential off-flavors (higher alcohols, acetaldehyde, sulfur ...


2

He mentions it in the linked article: A few things we’ve learned over the last couple centuries of brewing is that yeast generally works slower at cooler temperatures and faster at warmer temperatures, most esters and phenolics are produced during the growth phase of fermentation, which in my experience lasts about 4-5 days for lager strains, and beer ...


2

At the beginning of the fermentation the yeast have access to some oxygen and/or stores of the metabolites made with oxygen. This allows them to replicate a few times, so naturally that's what they do. A byproduct of this is ester production, and other stuff (acetaldehyde, diacetyl, maybe some sulfury compounds, etc) that we usually don't like in our beer. ...



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