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Generally yeasts are pretty sensitive to high levels of oxygen and high temperatures (Obvious when you fail to cool your wart before adding yeast - one of the many benefits to owning a wart chiller). Early in my brewing I attempted to split my yeast twice, once successfully to both primaries and once where it only worked in the first primary. Although, my ...


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Crosby & Bakers Distillers Active Dry Yeast is made by Red Star the same maker as Red Star Active Dry Bread Yeast. The amounts are 0.0125-0.25 tsp per gallon of wort. In laymens terms that's 1/8-1/4 tsp per gallon. Since your making beer to drink you'll use the 0.0125(1/8)tsp per gallon, the 0.25 or 1/4 tsp is for making still beer for distillation. In ...


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I disagree that yeast slurry shouldn't be 'washed' (purified, really) in general. I think it's all about how you go about it and what you want to accomplish. If it's done right, in a sanitary manner, it's perfectly safe and will allow more consistency and predictability in your finished beer. Storing under cold water over long periods is better than beer for ...


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Yes, the current consensus is don't bother rinsing (homebrewers almost never truly wash) the yeast. I have verified this for myself over the course of hundreds of batches. There is no advantage to rinsing the yeast and it's just another point where you could contaminate it. 1.) I have never found the trub to have any effect on the next batch. When I use ...


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Check the calculator at www.mrmalty.com. It gives you a way to calculate the amount of slurry to use. BTW, it's generally recognized there is no advantage to rinsing your yeast and could even be a source of contamination.


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Did you add any yeast nutrients or raisins to the must? Honey and water sound like a feast for your yeast, but it is really like trying to eat three square meals at an ice-cream parlor. There is no real nutrition available. The normal practice with meads is to fortify the must with some packaged yeast-nutrient. The ancient practice is to throw a few ...


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You see this mostly in wine, cider and mead making because those sources of fermentable sugars lack some of the nutrients needed by yeast for proper fermentation, which are usually present in malt-based worts. They are (aside from fermentable sugars): Amino acids/nitrogen - All-malt worts supply plenty of readily assimilable nitrogen. This is a big need ...


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I have never head this before, and after looking around quite a bit I couldn't find any evidence to support (or even suggest) the link. Only thing I can think of is either: this refers to a non S. cerevisiae yeast (maybe Brett or some other wild yeast), though I couldn't find any evidence of that either; or, some other substance beneficial to yeast happens ...



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