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It may be that the yeast consumed all the oxygen so no more oxidation could take place. Also, the darker coloured compound have likely broken down the oxidised compounds, lightening the solution.


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Suggestion: use gelatin to fine this beer. Gelatin works great at fining, and is especially effective when the beer is in the keg and at serving temperature already. (If you want to get rid of chill haze, the chill haze has to be present!)


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My experience as as professional brewer and home brewer leads me to suggest that oxygen is not detrimental to beer flavor unless yeast activity is in decline (i.e., after vigorous fermentation has subsided). So if you have forgotten to oxygenate, go ahead and do so as long as your beer has yet to achieve high krausen.


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In theory a 11g packet contains 220 billion cells, which should do fine for an 18 liter batch. 23 is not such a big difference, so I am sure you are not in any major risk area. With re-hydration you should be good. I am sure that, with the rousing, your beer will get closer to panned FG. Note that, when rousing the yeast bed you will also stir up a lot of ...


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The yeast need the oxygen to grow and reproduce, which is important for the first stage of primary fermentation when the yeast is multiplying and inhabiting your wort, which you want to happen as quickly as possible to avoid risk of infection when the wort is cool, exposed to air and does not yet have a protective yeast head. Unless you're brewing a high ...


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Once fermentation has started it is usually not recommended to add oxygen. Exceptions: When brewing a high alcohol beer you may add oxygen up to 12 hours after pitching, but not afterwords. Yeast will consume oxygen during the initial fermentation phase. After that the oxygen stays around to stale your beer.


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That's the color of yeast in suspension. When the yeast flocculate the color will go away and the cider should be clear. Also remember that when you're looking at a fermenter, you're looking through a lot more beer than you would see in a glass, so color and haze will appear more intense. The name of this phenomenon is easy to remember: Beer's Law. When the ...


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My experience with mead is that you should wait. What I do personnally is I bottle (I use twist-cap bottles which are not really air-tight), wait a few months and then siphon again to clean bottles, leaving just a bit more dead yeast at the bottom. My mead usually becomes really clear after about 8 months, and stops tasting yeasty at the same time. It's ...


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My plan of action is to test 11 fining agents: Albumex Bentonite Bentonite Biofine Clear Canaton Bentonite Caseine Soluble Colle Perle Cristalline Plus Inocolle Extra N1 Polycacel Polyclar VT Sparkolloid I plan to do 50-100ml samples in 100ml beakers. Most likely I will store them loosely covered in the fridge (I'm not too worried about oxidation in ...


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In April 2015 I broke or 'quiebre' a maguey to harvest its nectar, aguamiel, and I knew that I could make pulque from it, first time i tried to do this stuff. Well, i just took a sip of my own made pulque, and it tasted good. Let me share what little I know. One must harvest it right before the maguey shoot come out, ( 8-9yrs old maguey ) or if it just ...


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I have had ninja yeast and frat-boy yeast. :p I would let it go for one weeks after pitching the yeast, then take a reading. Taking a reading is the only way of finding out if something is happening. If there is no difference between your OG and a reading after a week, then add some new yeast. Good Luck.


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I don't think that Ginger Beer has the same proteins that barley/wheat beer does so it possibly won't get the same amount of froth. If there is a big layer of yeast at the bottom, then it may already be finished. You could pour of a very small sample and taste it. If it is sickly sweet, then the fermentation hasn't started. If it is dry, then perhaps it ...



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