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0

I had a same problem when I first started brewing. My starter kit came with one of those cheap plastic s-shaped airlocks.I got little if any bubbling through it. I threw it out and bought one of the cup style ones and never had the problem after that.


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Fermentation is done or perhaps stuck when the specific gravity remains unchanged for a few days. Sometimes a fermentation will seem to stall but then pick back up. The amount of bubbling through the airlock is not a great indicator of fermentation completion.


1

Your best bet is to add all your fermentables at once. The reason is that if you wait until your 7% beer has completed primary fermentation to add more yeast, you are adding that alcohol tolerant yeast to a hostile environment - one in which there is already a high level of alcohol present. Despite being bred as a "alcohol tolerant" yeast, it is still yeast ...


1

This sounds like a serious problem: pressure in the fermenter! The foam you have described sounds just right: the dark patches are happy yeast floating on the foam. But the "waft" of CO2 from "crack(ing)" the lid makes me wonder whether your fermenter is pressurized. Opening a fermenter should never result in a sudden release of CO2. The CO2 should hardly ...


4

It looks like you streaked several times from the same sample of yeast, and that there was a bit too much liquid in each streak (they resemble puddles). The liquid should be nearly invisible on your when applied to the plate. Also the plate surface should be a bit dry, so liquid is absorbed quickly. The streaking technique is important too: the plate in the ...


0

There is no magic number because it depends on your wort volume, OG, ambient temp, stir-plate, etc., but a short starter will benefit you as long as it's over 6 hours or so to ensure at least a couple of budding cycles. In a time crunch, you definitely cannot cold crash and decant—you'll decant a good fraction of your total cell count; defeating the purpose ...


0

Multiple single strain fermentation followed by blending gives much better control over the combined yeast character and is way more reproducible. It goes like this. Split the batch into multiple fermenters, innoculating each with a different yeast strain. You can split the wort volume equally the first time you brew the recipe. Ferment each part optimizing ...


0

Multiple single strain fermentation followed by blending gives much better control over the combined yeast character and is way more reproducible. It goes like this. Split the batch into multiple fermenters, innoculating each with a different yeast strain. You can split the wort volume equally the first time you brew the recipe. Ferment each part optimizing ...


1

First off, it sounds like you're talking about step-propagation, not kräusening (which is adding actively-fermenting beer to end-fermented beer to induce a true secondary fermentation). I find the issue here a bit vague, because you don't mention whether you're comparing pitching the same number of cells in both cases (one actively fermenting, and the other ...


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I work in a large, reputable home brew store. My experience with this yeast is the same as other yeasts. The lag time is completely normal in bigger beers. Recently, I brewed a Russian imperial with an OG of 1.100 and pitched 2 packs of this yeast. It took nearly 48 hours to see any activity. If you aerate appropriately, and your smack pack swells, you'll ...



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