New answers tagged

1

As a rule of thumb, I work on 1 gram of dried yeast per litre of wort. Has worked for me for the past 3 years. When using packets of yeast, I would simply sprinkle a whole 11.5 gram packet into my 10 litres of wort. Last year I purchased a 500gram package of S-04, so I simply measure out on my digital scales 10 grams of yeast per 10 litre brew. There is ...


1

It shouldn't be ruined, the yeast should still activate and work its way through your wort without the need to stir. As a previous answer mentioned, stirring your wort at this point in the process isn't a good idea unless you've made sure your stirring instrument is very well sanitized, and even then you still would be introducing oxygen to your batch which ...


2

Homebrewers are notoriously underpitching, if you look at it using commercial standards. Two to four packets would be healthy, "commercial grade" pitch. And "commercial grade" is what your yeast calculator is using. Remember, commercial breweries are all about cost reduction / income maximization, so the fact they pitch that many cells means they earn more ...


1

As already stated above, your batch should be OK. For the record, the instructions on my dry yeast packets (Safale/Saflager) read: PITCHING: sprinkle into wort. I have done this for over 180 brews with a 100% success rate. One key word - "sprinkle", so to avoid the risk of clumping, don't chuck or dump the yeast, sprinkle it. No need to rehydrate, even ...


0

I wouldn't be too concerned by it but just be sure to keep up with the gravity reading to check for real progress. That's the surefire way to make sure your beer is doing what it's supposed to. Airlock activity isn't the only sign.


1

Airlock activity is not the be-all end-all. You could have a bad seal on a bucket or on the airlock grommet itself. Give it a little time (3-4 days) then check the gravity. Gravity movement is really the only 100% reliable way to test if the yeast is working.


5

No. There was no need to stir, however; once the yeast become active, they'll start moving throughout the wort (and getting it to move quite a lot) all by themselves. As well, stirring the wort could introduce contaminates or oxygen from the environment. But there should never be a need to stir, either. If you're using dry yeast, you really should rehydrate ...


1

Doubtful you ruined it. As long as you practiced good sanitation. I'm guessing it was dry yeast if it was floating. I would swirl the fermentor to make a whirlpool with the fermentor sealed until it's mixed in. This should remove any yeast stuck to the sides and help get some oxygen in the wort. In the future hydrate your yeast before pitching.


0

A slant/plate made directly from a starter will likely stay viable longer than that picked up from trub. I'd estimate under decent conditions it should be good for up to about 6 months.... longer if under optimum conditions. But like Evil Zymurgist said, there are many, many factors at play here.


1

I think that a Fermentis Safbrew T-58 would be a close match.


0

This one might be an option for you. I have not used it myself, but read in various forums that it is a good option. http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Safbrew-S-33-en.pdf


0

Your dry yeast will be fine. The reason your kit was in the refrigerator was to preserve the hops. You don't need (or want) to chill your yeast before you use it.


2

0.004 difference is also 1 Blg difference, to say it in units I know. That's pretty big here. At the same time, it's also pretty possible your fermentation has finished. If in doubt, I would try fast fermentation test. Take generous amount of baker's yeast, fresh. Like, 1/5 cup. Fill the rest of cup with your beer, stir, put in dry warm place and wait a day ...


0

Didn't go wrong with WLP715 Champagne yeast. This particular yeast is neutral tasting - as opposed to some estery flavours that most ale yeasts would impart to the end product. And if you are aiming for a higher ABV, this particular strain has a high attenuation and a quite a high alcohol tolerance.


2

It is dried yeast, it will be fine. You should how ever allow it to warm to room temperature before adding it to your wort. And, you should probably look at how to rehydrate it before pitching or make a starter.


2

It should not matter that much. if you order it online the postal service won't keep it refridgerated either.


0

After adding the yest and waiting 3-4 days ask these questions... Does it: A) Look like beer? B) Smell Like Beer? C) Taste like beer? If the answer to A and B is NO, then don't taste it, if the answer to all if Yes then you are good to go.


1

I always leave the lid of the fermentor on loose, covering the bin so that no bacteria, mold etc will fall in but allowing the air to circulate for the first 24 hours until a nice kraussen has formed then seal it up. I used to seal it up tight on day 0 for the fear of the air getting in, but after reading Yeast by Chris White I changed my tune entirely and ...


0

As the previous posters mention it sounds OK just a bit of a slow start. If after 48 hours you are still concerned, take a gravity reading and if it has not noticeably dropped, then re-pitch a new starter.



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