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Have to laugh at Rob.O : "My beer wipes the floor (prolly a good metaphor that) with it, when it comes to alcohol percent . Ok, you make it stronger, got it. The taste is o.k. (what happened to this massive floor wiping action???); now comes the best. My friends are pissed after 2-3 pints. Sheesh, better exit the teenie years at the very least before ...


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It seems that the ferment is already more than half finished, so there already some bonus flavors in your beer. I found some people saying 72F is fine, 75F is a little estery, 80F is really too warm. You can try to cool the ferment a little more in the later stages, it might help, but this yeast might finish up by tomorrow. In the future, try other ...


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This question is possibly far too broad for the scope of this site, but I'll do my best to point you in the right direction. Other than consuming sugar and excreting alcohol, yeast's abilities vary strain-to-strain (and sometimes even by brand). Lalvin 71B, for example, is known for its ability to consume malic acid. EC-1118 and K1V-1116/ICV K1 are great ...


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Feel free to add more yeast, it won't hurt. If you add a different strain of yeast it may affect the final flavour profile. It usually takes about a day for the initial signs of fermentation to appear if you haven't made a starter. Only trash the batch if you are certain it has become contaminated, this would only become apparent after a few days. I would ...


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Sure, there is no problem pitching additional yeast. How long has it been since you pitched the yeast and what was the expiration date on the package. If yeast gets near the expiration date a lot of the yeast cells have died off and it may take longer for you to see actual fermentation activity, sometimes up to 18 - 24 hours. The yeast may be actively ...


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I have used champagne yeast to make an ale but never alone, I have added it to very strong high ABV brews to dry them out at the end of the fermentation. If you want an ale flavour then use a standard ale yeast for the first week or 2 then add in the champagne yeast. Most of the yeast based flavours are made in the first 3-4 days of your brew, so the main ...


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If I am going for a sweet Ginger Beer then I use a low attenuating Ale yeast such as S04, for a drier Ginger Ale I tend to use a wine yeast, and allow it a few days longer to ferment out more of the sugars. I have used Baking yeast, baking yeast is not a good plan, but as a student I had no other to hand and it made something roughly drinkable. Would love ...


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As Chino Brews says The WhiteLab site refers to this blend as "Flocculation: Medium". I have used other yeasts describe similarly they have all cleared over the course of a month. It may be the yeast, in which case using isinglass would help. As with most things in brewing there are myriad reasons other than the yeast as to why your brew may be cloudy take ...


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It seems that you are just looking to increase your final alcohol percentage. If that is the case, consider bottling up some of your beer in plastic 2-litre bottles and throwing them in your freezer for a day or two. The water content of the beer will freeze, but the flavor compounds and alcohol won't. Once you've got an ice-cube floating in the middle of ...


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Dry hopping and secondary fermentation are not great things to do together. Dry hopping is best done after fermentation, preferably after racking the beer off of the yeast cake. The acids from the hops will actually stick to the yeast (that's how they inhibit the growth of bacteria, etc) reducing the flavor. I also suspect that having active fermentation ...


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Adding hops late in the process is pretty common, it's called dry hopping. It's a great way to enhance the aroma of hops, without increasing the bitterness too much. It creates a nice fresh characteristic in the beer. Adding more yeast is not exactly common, but not unheard of. It can be used if the fermentation is stuck, and needs a kick. Sometimes yeast ...


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I do a two step bottling method. Carbonate the beer in one bottle then transfer it to another bottle recapping before it losing carbonation. You will definitely need a second pair of hands for this. But you vastly decrease the amount of sediment.


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Autolysis is not going to be an issue, but viability will be. In my experience, viability is very hit and miss. I've stored yeast in canning jars in my fridge for 6 months and they still worked, and I've had some that were very slow to get going and some that didn't work at all that were only stored a month. Really, I don't harvest yeast much anymore. ...


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You'll want to keep the yeast cool (under some beer) or cold (in the fridge after the beer is removed) to minimize autolysis. The warmer it is the faster they run out of glycogen, and once they run out they'll start dying. Dead cells aren't necessarily a problem, as long as your viability hasn't dropped too much. If most of the yeast are alive, then they ...


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Fermentation time will depend on a lot of factors...if you want to compare to Wyeast, you need to specify which strain. 05 and 1056 ferment in about the same amount of time. but 05 often takes longer to drop clear. I think 05 -may- ferment a bit faster than 04, but no guarantees. The difference in flavor between 04 and 05 is dramatic.



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