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0

Well, hard to chase an answer by D.C. but here you go: I like to count air bubbles in the airlock. Immediately after filling the carboy, you could have some off-gassing that isn't fermentation however (just like after transferring to secondary). No bubbles at all? Checking the gravity sounds good but bear in mind you should see some rapid changes in ...


0

A lager needs a really big starter. Somewhere on the order of a gal. starter is normal. That takes several days to build. You likely underpitched. In the future, use a resource like www.mrmalty.com to calculate your starter size. Are you certain there's no fermentation at all? Have you checked the gravity? That's really the only way to know. I would ...


1

In general, yeast will die at temps exceeding 115F.


6

No way. You will kill everything in your beer at this temperature. The pasteurization process actually uses lower temps, probably with less exposure time, and kills them all. And its ok to use any beer yeast to carbonation, you don't need the same strain.


0

There is a product called Sedex which you can use to prevent leaving sediment in your bottles. They are basically a two part cap. you ferment your bottles inverted and all the sediment falls into the cap then when they are fully carbonated, you remove the one part of the cap which has caught all the sediment leaving the bottle sealed and conditioned without ...


2

Everything is fine. Apple juice is almost entirely fully-fermentable sugar; there's no real reason to add more sugar unless you want more alcohol. If you do add sugar, though, you should probably dissolve it either in the juice itself or some water, before adding it. Only 8 hours into the fermentation, you could probably get away with gently swirling the ...


1

Yeast is usually categorised by how well they flocculate, the esters and phenols they release and the attenuation you can expect. A "standard" American yeast (US05) is descibed as "clean", whereas your "standard" British yeast (S04) is described as fruity. Your weiss yeasts would be very fruity with high banana and spicy with clove. A lager yeast might be ...


0

The higher the fermentation temp, the greater your chances of fusels.


1

No, it won't. Yeast companies generally overestimate the high end temps. They tell you where the yeast will work best, not necessarily the temps that make the best beers. And no matter what the high end is, you'll always get better results by pitching at the low end (or below) of the stated temp range. The first 72 hours are the most critical. If you ...



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