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7

I can't imagine anyone suggesting bottling at a FG of 1.042 I would return them to the fermenter and allow fermintation to complete. Those are bottle bombs. Be careful. Many yeasts don't survive at 6.5% ABV, but there are plenty that do. Wine yeasts for example. At 1.042 we would call that a stalled or stuck fermentation, and a more tolerant yeast can be ...


4

Smack packs contain yeast nutrients, and sugars nothing magical. Its just a mini starter in a bag for proofing yeast for direct pitching. Don't need it at all If doing your own starter. If you do all grain your wort has all the nutrients it needs. Sounds like your 1st stage went fine. I would just step up as normal. At the risk of infection just throw the ...


3

I would just rehydrate the packet of yeast in 500mLs of water using a measuring cup. Then just pour 100mLs in each fermentor. The only thing that sounds 'crazy' about your experiment is the water type test. Extract contains the minerals from the original water source used when mashing at the manufacturer. So adding minerals or whatever you plan to do ...


3

Yeast with a high floculation rate will do this, they usually break off the bottom and float up from trapped c02. Beer looks really clear, good job. When you rack to secondary, go ahead and let the floaters suck into the secondary, usually this is enough to break them up and let them settle. If you don't mind the extra loss you can leave them behind. ...


2

https://www.wyeastlab.com/rw_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=136 Wyeast Adrennes seems to be the best bet. Did you save the yeast trub from the WLP545 brew?


1

That is a small batch 2.43 gallons. I too show a yeast viability at 56% Your starter volume of 300ml seems low. That is more of a proofing volume. My calculator shows 107bil cell growth if you use 1000ml starter (4oz DME) 1.040sg wort using NO stirplate. Stirplate will bump it up to 167bil cells. I wouldn't use a Stirplate in this case. Do a 1000ml ...


1

Yes, it roughly lines up using my preferred calculator if I use the stir-plate aeration options (the "C.White" option has 124 bn cells, "Kai" has 95 bn cells). I'll note that the Brewer's Friend calculator does show 56% viability, or about 59 bn cells, not 36 bn. What sort of aeration method are you using for the starter? That has a huge impact on the ...


1

Just build a starter for 5 gallons and split evenly, 1500-2000ml is an average starter. Main benifiet here is to decant the starter wort and only pitch the slurry this will minimize the starters water contribution for your experiment.


1

From the picture it looks like normal yeast clumps to me. Sometimes you get dried krausen falling back in the beer and it doesn't really dissolve and settle out. Its hard to say looking at an internet picture, but that's what it looks like to me.


1

Traditionally the wort is put in a cold ship over night to inoculate . This is a large shallow vat to maximize air exposure for spontanuous fermintation. Once wort is inoculated the growth phase happens pretty fast, and the brewer is happy. I don't know of any method outside of a lab to test if there is X many yeast cells in Y volume of air. Most of these ...


1

For a quick answer for a homebrew definition of "Bottle Conditioning". No Not without a lot of extra work and or using gimmick devices. Bottle Conditioning in homebrew generally means to allow suspended yeast after fermintation to carbonate the beer to a desired c02 volume by feeding it a small amount of fermentable sugar, usually 4oz Corn Sugar for a ...


1

I recently made a beautiful loaf of whole grain bread using the following method: After transferring a toasted oatmeal stout from my primary fermenter to my secondary, I let the trub settle again. I carefully skimmed the rest of the beer off of the trub. I mixed 125g of this beer with 125g of bread flour. Usually with my sourdough starter, it takes 4-5 ...



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