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8

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


4

You can use a beer priming-sugar calculator to determine the correct amount. For 2L of beer, which probably already has ~2 volumes of CO₂, you probably only need 3-5g of table sugar and just a sprinkle of yeast, and then you're mostly just going to presurize the vessel instead of really carbonating the beer itself. If you let the beer go flat, first, assume ...


2

He mentions it in the linked article: A few things we’ve learned over the last couple centuries of brewing is that yeast generally works slower at cooler temperatures and faster at warmer temperatures, most esters and phenolics are produced during the growth phase of fermentation, which in my experience lasts about 4-5 days for lager strains, and beer ...


2

At the beginning of the fermentation the yeast have access to some oxygen and/or stores of the metabolites made with oxygen. This allows them to replicate a few times, so naturally that's what they do. A byproduct of this is ester production, and other stuff (acetaldehyde, diacetyl, maybe some sulfury compounds, etc) that we usually don't like in our beer. ...


2

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...


1

Before I switched to kegs, the easiest and most reliable method I found was to siphon off some of the beer (typically a litre or so), warm it in a saucepan, and dissolve the appropriate amount of priming sugar. I used dextrose or some other invert sugar since it seems more likely to ferment out thoroughly, and less likely to impart off flavors. Of course I ...


1

Rack your beer out of the fermenter into a sanitised bottling bucket, which could just be another fermenter, where the beer is evenly mixed with all your priming sugar before being bottled straight from there. Normally the under / over carbonation issue is caused by differing amounts of priming sugar added to each bottle when priming the bottle ...


1

As a long-time practitioner of this method, I'd recommend waiting longer than this article suggests. For me, the real benefit of the technique is an accelerated reduction of diacetyl at the end of fermentation, since by the time esters have maxed out (more on that below) pretty much all other potential off-flavors (higher alcohols, acetaldehyde, sulfur ...


1

If you use commercial beer it probably won't work. The beer will likely be filtered which will remove most of all of the yeast so more sugar won't recarb it. You could use a carbonator cap and CO2 to do what you want, though.


1

If you freeze and add sugar later ... remember that it could start to ferment again.


1

The yeast will likely change the character of the beer. Quick solution would be to go with the carbonation drops. You might also consider a draft box which allows for a CO2 cartridge to carbonate the beer.



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