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It looks like you streaked several times from the same sample of yeast, and that there was a bit too much liquid in each streak (they resemble puddles). The liquid should be nearly invisible on your when applied to the plate. Also the plate surface should be a bit dry, so liquid is absorbed quickly. The streaking technique is important too: the plate in the ...


2

You are doing two things (over-pitching and fermenting under pressure) that will drastically reduce the amount of ester production, which is primarily responsible for the fruitiness of beer. Over-pitching reduces the extent of yeast growth, which is directly related to ester production. Basically the yeast can reproduce fewer times over, having started at ...


1

Your best bet is to add all your fermentables at once. The reason is that if you wait until your 7% beer has completed primary fermentation to add more yeast, you are adding that alcohol tolerant yeast to a hostile environment - one in which there is already a high level of alcohol present. Despite being bred as a "alcohol tolerant" yeast, it is still yeast ...


1

This sounds like a serious problem: pressure in the fermenter! The foam you have described sounds just right: the dark patches are happy yeast floating on the foam. But the "waft" of CO2 from "crack(ing)" the lid makes me wonder whether your fermenter is pressurized. Opening a fermenter should never result in a sudden release of CO2. The CO2 should hardly ...


1

First off, it sounds like you're talking about step-propagation, not kräusening (which is adding actively-fermenting beer to end-fermented beer to induce a true secondary fermentation). I find the issue here a bit vague, because you don't mention whether you're comparing pitching the same number of cells in both cases (one actively fermenting, and the other ...



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