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9

An individual yeast cell is either dead or alive. A packet of yeast will have millions to billions of cells though. Some percentage of that will be alive, and the remaining percentage will be dead. The older the packet, and the worse the storage conditions, the higher the percentage of dead yeast. Depends on the brand of kit. Some kits use no-name yeast, ...


5

The primary benefit of a starter is having the proper number of healthy yeast cells to ferment your wort. By "proper number", we mean about 0.75 million cells per milliliter per degree Plato of wort for ales, and 1.5 million cells/mL/P for lagers. (Consider that smack packs and vials have about 100bn cells when fresh, which is only enough cells for 5gl/19L ...


3

The yeast could be old. Sometimes those off the shelf kits can be really old, but all the ones I am familiar with come with dry yeast and those packs should be good for over a year, unless the pack got super hot, or a bad batch of yeast, etc. Other potential issues with a higher finish gravity could be: the yeast isn't finished, so allow more time before ...


3

In the first stage of fermentation it could be some good. Yeast needs oxygen to the growth phase, when building membrane and other things needed to increase the cell count. When this oxygen is over, then the yeast can take its anaerobian way, and produce alcohol and carbon dioxide, which is needed for beer making. But if you shake your wort vigorously some ...


2

You need to check the gravity of the must/wine to see if fermentation has finished. Specific gravity tells you about the residual sugar in the must/wine. Specific gravity is measured with a hydrometer. (If you know about this then disregard) Bubbling can be from dissolved CO2 in solution. It will come out of the wine as the temperature fluctuates or if ...


2

Seeing how your beer is at 22-23 degrees, I think the issues are more yeast related. Rousing the yeast one more time to see what you get might be your only option. I usually let the beers I brew go for two weeks, often three, before I check them. You could try and get a small active starter going with some fresh yeast. Say in a growler with a 1.030 DME ...


1

I don't know the answer, but vibration and agitation are not the same thing. I don't think the vibration from the washer will do much to keep yeast in suspension. I do think I read once that vibration can stress yeast out. But at what frequency I don't think that is clear.


1

I would also be concerned with the washing machine's effect on your wort temperature. If you use hot water "for your whites", that heat will rise, right into your fermenter. Where I live, (Florida) keeping the wort cool is a real challenge, especially during the first few days of fermenting when the alcholol level is not yet high enough to limit yeast ...


1

I'd heat it up for a while. In general, you do get better quality if you wait it out at a lower temperature, but if it's a question of whether you get the next brew down or not, and your brew is currently not moving at all, then it seems worthwhile. What I do is to just run hot water into the laundry tub with the brew bucket sitting in it. You can easily ...


1

To expand on a few answers: 1. Yeast cells can become fatigued over time, and over generations. You don't need to worry about this as long as you're buy new yeast every time. When you start re-using yeast from a previous fermentation, you will need to worry. As for testing effectiveness - that's where making a starter (question 3) is very beneficial - ...


1

I think the initial fermentation failed to start for two reasons. First, you didn't pitch enough yeast. An 11g packet of dry ale yeast is intended to ferment 5 gallons of beer. So your 1 gallon jugs should have each received a little of 2g of yeast. Secondly, the ambient temperature was at the bottom end of the range for that yeast. Cold temperatures lead to ...



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