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5

Washing yeast with Starsan will kill most of the yeast. Just like it kills off other microbes in your equipment when you sanitize. All stored yeast should really be used within a few weeks. I prefer to just leave the beer on top of the yeast in a mason jar. Washing is not necessary. I decant the spent beer when I am ready to pitch into a new starter ...


3

'So what exactly is 4 - 6 generations? [...] Are all of those considered generation 2?' A generation of yeast is considered as having gone from pitching to post-fermentation collection. So if you ferment a batch with new yeast and collect five jars, those are all first generation. If you pitched every one of those jars into a new batch and collected five ...


3

Traditionally cider is made without pitching additional yeast. There is plenty of wild yeast on the apple skin. In fact apple skin is such a reliable source of wild yeast that it's often used for making a sour-dough starter. Unless you've taken steps to kill the wild yeast that's what the foam is and that is what will ferment your cider.


2

"High Krausen"/"Exponential Growth Phase" As the yeast feeds it produces co2 and the bubbles make a foam of yeast and other materials in the beer.


2

Could be a yeast or could be lactobacilius - or both! Either way its going now and the only way to stop it is to pasteurise it. I would tend to let it go. As has been said, cider was traditionally made by crushing the juice and storing it in a vat to ferment naturally over some time. No yeast was ever bought or added. In the majority of cases the cider ...


2

You should be ok just using less than an 1/8th of it, but wouldn't do harm adding the whole pack. Just follow the pitching instructions on the yeasts datasheet. Hydration etc.


1

How soon is "soon"? It looks like you've sprinkled dry yeast across the top of your (chilled) brew kettle and maybe waited 10-20 minutes? If so, this is the yeast "blooming" in response to being reactivated from their dried state. At what temperature is the wort? Can you provide any more detail about your process?


1

One can use yeast for a fast ferment in an attempt to keep the alcohol down and just produce enough gas to carbonate the drink. Something like 4g per bottle (equivalent to brewers "priming" their beer) should do the trick. But it does produce a (very) weak alcoholic drink. One ("the real") way to make alcohol free ginger beer is to use "Ginger beer plant" ...


1

We have made naturally carbonated root beer in the past, the alcohol produced in the short time it takes to carbonate in bottles is negligible. Probably same or higher alcohol content in the dregs of a bottle of grape juice after a few weeks in the fridge. Keep tasting the soda from time to time to monitor the carbonation level, some tough little yeast ...


1

Ingesting active yeast is not dangerous. If it was people drinking unfiltered craft beer or any kind of real yogurt would have died off centuries ago. The worst that can happen is that too much yeast may upset your stomach or your digestive process for a day. Its hard to say how much alcohol you'll get because its really depends on how active you let the ...


1

Well, I've never brewed anything non alcoholic but I know adding yeast to it will result in fermentation and produce alcohol. I suppose you could mix up/infuse the ingredients in your recipe, boil it to sanitise it (to maybe kill off any wild yeast) and cool it rapidly. Alternatively, you could use the correct amount of Sodium Metabisulfite (Campden ...


1

It could be that your pack wasn't as healthy or fresh as what you are used to seeing with Nottingham packs. I saw several other posts online of poor fermentation characters from this same yeast. So comparing the attenuation from one manufacturer to the next might be a little misleading. I'd had to see how low attenuating mangrove jack yeast strain would ...


1

The attenuation rating for yeast is meant as a way of comparing one strain to another using a standard wort. It may not reflect the attenuation you can actually expect. The actual attenuation is much more dependent on wort composition than attenuation rating. Using the same yeast I can get anywhere from about 60-85% attenuation depending on the wort.


1

I made the following beer: 90% malted 2-row barley 10% flaked maize mashed between 66 and 69 degrees celcius 1.043 original gravity fermented with M79 1.011 final gravity Had I fermented this with my usual Nottingham, I would have expected this to get down to around 1.007 FG. I fermented with M79, and it only got down to about 1.011 (about 70% ...


1

Don't wash with wort, you won't get the chance. It will take off before what you want to extract settles. Just rack on top the cake and use it for what it is. As long as you practice good sanitation to the fermentor while racking the old beer out and the new in you can keep it longer. Use a sanitary siphon style cane, or wrap the cane and access port with ...


1

It's probably as safe as anything in a sanitary environment, though if I'm understanding you correctly it means another, however small, potential window of exposure to dangerous microbes since you're racking twice. I've reused yeast a few times to no ill effect, but a lot of literature advises against doing it more than that. It also sounds like more work ...



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