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The gas is formed by regular anaerobic yeast fermentation. When you put a lot of yeast with a small amount of food (the residual sugars in your beer) the yeast cells are better able to consume that food than they would be otherwise. In addition to the danger of the jar exploding, excess pressure is also bad for the yeast. I use canning jars that have a flat ...


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Most likely the yeast had been very slowly fermenting/respirating in the fridge, I always crack open the lid every few days on any yeast I am storing. Cooling the yeast doesn't fully stop their metabolism, but slows it greatly unless you are dropping them into a -80C lab freezer or Liquid Nitrogen -170C. After 4 weeks your yeast is likely fine, it would ...


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It sounds like you are doing nothing wrong. Most likely the yeast had been very slowly fermenting/respirating in the fridge, I always crack open the lid every few days on any yeast I am storing. Cooling the yeast doesn't fully stop their metabolism, but slows it greatly unless you are dropping them into a -80C lab freezer or Liquid Nitrogen -170C. after 4 ...


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I'd wager your yeast is just fine after only one month under refrigeration. That's still relatively fresh. Here is an example of an experiment that involved pitching a five-month-old slurry without even making a starter. The tasters were unable to distinguish that beer from a beer made with a fresh pitch of yeast. Speaking from personal experience, I've ...



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