Hot answers tagged

7

Without pressure canning, unfermented wort doesn't have a low enough pH to be shelf stable. From The Maltose Falcons website: The process is almost identical to the one that you or your family may have used to preserve peaches, tomatoes, pickles, etc. The normal preservation method is hot water bath canning, but since wort is a low acid food you must ...


5

Sanitation is not sterilization. You might find a couple jars out of a batch last longer than others. But the only way to be sure is to buy a pressure canner. They are relatively cheap and can be used in the kitchen later for cooking as well. Mason jars make great containers, but lets not lose site of what they are really made for... sterile canning. In ...


4

Smack packs contain yeast nutrients, and sugars nothing magical. Its just a mini starter in a bag for proofing yeast for direct pitching. Don't need it at all If doing your own starter. If you do all grain your wort has all the nutrients it needs. Sounds like your 1st stage went fine. I would just step up as normal. At the risk of infection just throw the ...


4

According to Beer Advocate, This is when the beer has been exposed to ultraviolet light for a period of time. Hop-derived molecules, called isohumulones, are basically ripped apart. So unless you're adding hops to your starter (which you shouldn't be), light shouldn't be much an issue.


4

Just do it Nothing you described is needed or beneficial with modern liquid yeast packages. For example Weast's Activator: The Activator™ package was designed with superior UV light- and oxygen-barrier material to extend shelf life, making our 6 month from manufacture date Product Warranty possible. Yeast slowly depletes energy reserves while in storage....


3

Really depends if you use hops or not. I always put a few pellets in for thier antimictobial properties. And it depends when and how you pitch your starters. Light + hops would be bad If your starter is just to reduce lag time ie pitching it at high krausen. While this is common it's mostly of those that have never tasted a starter and ignorantly add all ...


3

Yes, starter calculators are a post boil volume. Your boil off depends on what you're boiling in (surface area mainly) and how hot you boil it. Do a test to see how much your vessel and burner boils off in 15 min, then add that volume to your total starter volume for you wort boil. I boil right in the flask and only get about 100-200ml boil off.


2

I don't know your calculator. No one here knows unless you will link to it. So we cannot tell what it's developers had in mind. That said, you want about 1.040 OG / 10 Blg after boil. If that means starting with 2 liters and boiling it to 1.5, do it. If this means starting with 3l and boiling down to 2? So be it. The one you linked gives you post-boil ...


2

That is a small batch 2.43 gallons. I too show a yeast viability at 56% Your starter volume of 300ml seems low. That is more of a proofing volume. My calculator shows 107bil cell growth if you use 1000ml starter (4oz DME) 1.040sg wort using NO stirplate. Stirplate will bump it up to 167bil cells. I wouldn't use a Stirplate in this case. Do a 1000ml ...


2

Yes, it roughly lines up using my preferred calculator if I use the stir-plate aeration options (the "C.White" option has 124 bn cells, "Kai" has 95 bn cells). I'll note that the Brewer's Friend calculator does show 56% viability, or about 59 bn cells, not 36 bn. What sort of aeration method are you using for the starter? That has a huge impact on the ...


2

Have you taken a gravity reading? I've had starters that have very little apparent activity that are fermenting right along. It can be tricky to take a gravity sample for a low-volume starter, but with 3L you should have enough to work with to solve this problem w/o overly reducing your cell count. Also, is the starter on a stir-plate, shaken periodically or ...


2

When a starter volume is referenced it's the volume of wort the yeast is allowed to grown in. Post boil volume etc. And should have a SG of 1.040 We can't tell you how much a proper pitch is in your case as more variables need to be known. Look for a Yeast Pitch Calculator software / website / app etc, they are all based on the same formulas, that will ...


2

Airlock activity is not the be-all end-all. You could have a bad seal on a bucket or on the airlock grommet itself. Give it a little time (3-4 days) then check the gravity. Gravity movement is really the only 100% reliable way to test if the yeast is working.


2

First thing, its not generally recommended or needed to make starters when using the dried yeast that you listed. That being said its not likely to super hurt you either. Its likely a combination of issues. To be absolutely sure of your sanitation process be sure you are also sanitizing all your starter equipment too. Treat it just like you do the brewing ...


2

Yeah, unless you actually pressure seal those bad boys, I wouldn't risk it. My rule of thumb is to weigh out the possible benefits and down falls of taking a shortcut. The upside could be saving a few minutes of heating then an hour of two (where you don't have to be around or do anything) waiting for it to cool. The down side is very high - at best, you ...


1

The gas is formed by regular anaerobic yeast fermentation. When you put a lot of yeast with a small amount of food (the residual sugars in your beer) the yeast cells are better able to consume that food than they would be otherwise. In addition to the danger of the jar exploding, excess pressure is also bad for the yeast. I use canning jars that have a flat ...


1

Most likely the yeast had been very slowly fermenting/respirating in the fridge, I always crack open the lid every few days on any yeast I am storing. Cooling the yeast doesn't fully stop their metabolism, but slows it greatly unless you are dropping them into a -80C lab freezer or Liquid Nitrogen -170C. After 4 weeks your yeast is likely fine, it would ...


1

It sounds like you are doing nothing wrong. Most likely the yeast had been very slowly fermenting/respirating in the fridge, I always crack open the lid every few days on any yeast I am storing. Cooling the yeast doesn't fully stop their metabolism, but slows it greatly unless you are dropping them into a -80C lab freezer or Liquid Nitrogen -170C. after 4 ...


1

It's much simpler to use 1/2 gallon or gallon plastic juice bottles. Freeze or refridgerate the boiled wort. When using I bring my starter flask of wort to boil for a few minutes, chill and inoculate. I get that mason jars at cellar temps would save fridge space, but if you use larger bottles keeping a couple gallons of wort in the back of the fridge/...


1

Sounds like everything is doing fine. 8 hours of lag time isn't bad at all. Extra headspace has no effect on actual fermentation and little effect on air lock activity, though c02 does slightly fit in between molecules in air as it mixes, it's so small it's only a matter of note for novelty.


1

Fermentation needs lots of oxygen. What I usually do in my 10 l batch is to shake my fermentation vat to add more oxygen to the wort before pitching the yeat and put the air lock on the vat. I assume you started your yeast before pitching it. I once did not do that and sprinkled the dry yeats over the wort as per instructions on the package, however, it ...


1

You want to grow the slant up to about 100b cells by a mini starter, I start with 500ml 1.040 with nutrients. Then treat that as I would a new pack of yeast. Each step up of a starter takes 12-24 hours generally. Stirplate will help a lot to give more growth in shorter times.


1

IMO you should always decant your starters Starters are for yeast growth and health. Unfortunately this environment of a starter usually makes terrible beer, because the yeast is allowed to have an ideal metabolism for reproduction as a result they create a lot of unwanted esters. The main differences between your batch beer and the starter beer (the part ...


1

No, it is not true. The "yield factor" of yeast is a function of both the starter volume and the inoculation rate.


1

First off, it sounds like you're talking about step-propagation, not kräusening (which is adding actively-fermenting beer to end-fermented beer to induce a true secondary fermentation). I find the issue here a bit vague, because you don't mention whether you're comparing pitching the same number of cells in both cases (one actively fermenting, and the other ...


1

This is a very broad question but here's some direction: ...and the usefulness of this answer depends on whether you are planning on starting a long term barrel project or a medium term sour beer or a very quick sour batch... Something is growing, but it is certainly changing the ratios of different critters. My thinking would be to split the starter up ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible