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8

Danstar BRY-97 is a great option for American-style IPAs. It starts out kind of rough, but if you give it enough time to condition, it makes an amazing beer. Fermentis Safale US-05 and Danstar Nottingham also a popular choices for American-style IPAs. You should ferment them at the low end of their temperature ranges. For English-style IPAs, you can use ...


6

The nutrient in a Wyeast pouch is around 1.020. There's not enough of it there to have an appreciable effect on your starter gravity. You can pretty much discount it entirely.


5

US-05 (= Wyeast1056, = WLP001) is a pretty good option for IPAs. Dry yeast should be rehydrated, but the higher cell count generally means you don't need a starter.


5

Mostly economical, yes. Another reason is potentially limited (or non-existent) commercial availability of specific strains. Either the yeast company's seasonal strain releases or something cultivated from yeast remaining in the bottle. Another reason is to develop a "house" strain, or to modify the behavior of an existing strain. For instance, the ...


5

I do this about once or twice a year. I'm an all grain brewer, so I typically just brew a batch of base malt. You can do the same with buying some DME/LME and adding that to the right amount of water to get the SG around 1.035-1.040. Your process sounds good, although I would probably blend all the DME and water at once so you can check the SG, and then ...


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to ...


5

If the starter was not hopped, you should be ok since the hops are needed to produce the skunky flavors. The UV radiation in sunlight can damage yeast cells, but they are capable of self-repair to a degree, so there should still be plenty of viable cells to continue fermentation. It's a good idea to not pitch the spent starter wort in general, here, I ...


4

You don't need a starter since you're pitching to 1/4 batch size that a whitelabs vial is good for. Normally you'd use 2-4 vials for a 20 liter batch, depending upon gravity, so that's equivalent to 1/2 to 1 a vial for a 5 liter batch. For the detailed figures, see Always making a starter vs. following package description. One way to know the OG prior to ...


4

First, unless the starter temp goes over maybe 90F, there is no damage to the yeast itself. second, for a starter of the size that you'll need for a tripel, the best course of action is to decant the spent wort before pitching so it won't have any flavor effect on your beer. remember, with a starter you're growing yeast, not making beer, and a starter ...


4

I get the same kraeusen when using liquid yeast - it's not from hydration shock. In fact, the dead yeast that don't survive hydration simply fall to the bottom of the fermentor. The reason for the kraeusen is the constant churning of the wort during active fermentation, which mixes proteins, tannins and hop-alpha acids to create the structure for the ...


4

That sounds like a plan. When the starter is cool the yeast will sediment quicker so you can pour off the spent wort easier. Definitely take yeast out of the fridge on brewday, let it warm. If you have some additional sterile wort, then you can decant the spent wort and pitch the fresh wort as soon as the yeast has come up to room temp. Otherwise, if you ...


3

The easiest way to determine the effect of starter gravity is to decant the starter so the amount is negligible. In addition, I've found that it makes better beer.


3

It's almost always a good idea. Pitching the right amount of healthy, active yeast is one of the easiest and most important things you can do. This is especially true for high-gravity beer, which is harder for the yeast to grow in. There's a great and fairly concise discussion of these issues on Mr. Malty, as well as a calculator that tells you how many ...


3

Ideally, you want the liquid portion of the starter to be crystal clear, meaning no yeast is left in suspension. In this scenario, you carefully pour the liquid off the sediment, leaving a enough to swirl around, bringing the sediment up into suspension, and then pitch. If the starter is small (1 or 2 quarts), and the yeast hasn't settled out completely, ...


3

It does not need to be 5.00000 gallons, don't worry about the small differences. You can aerate after pitching the yeast, so long as it's immediately after; the yeast need oxygen during the lag phase, but once alcohol starts being produced, you don't want to introduce oxygen at that point.


2

I would say that you have answered this yourself in your post. Since Wyeast liquid yeast is a 100% liquid yeast it does not contain any sugars that contribute to a higher OG. If it did contain any sugars it would start fermenting by itself in the tube... In your case you do not need to take this into account but if you are worried about your starting not ...


2

The "scientific" way would be to use a microscope and hemacytometer to count cells. The empirical method is what I use and has worked well for me for several hundred batches. You make a guess! I use between 1/3-1/2 of a previous slurry if I'm going to direct pitch the slurry. I use between 2 TBSP. -1/4 cup if I'm going to make a new starter from slurry.


2

Too much oxygen in a starter is almost impossible, so long as you decant the liquid and don't pitch it with the yeast. If you plan to pitch the liquid (e.g. to kraeusen a beer or restart a stuck ferment) then don't stir at all since you'll be pitching oxidized wort. A vortex isn't necessary for oxygen uptake - just having the surface in continual motion ...


2

Underpitching/stressing the yeast is not a way to get a controlled result. At 1/2 the recommended pitching rate wouldn't be a concern if you were fermenting warmer (66-68°F), but at 62°F I'd say you should at least start with the right amount of yeast, or you risk not least under-attenuation. If you want less clove then ferment warmer also, and ...


2

Adjusting pitching rate is a very iffy way to control a flavor profile. How much do you underpitch to get the effect you want? How do you know your underpitching enough, assuming it even works? Yeast selection and fermentation temp are much more controllable. Also, a number of yeast specialists, such as Dr. Clayton Cone of Lallemand ...


2

It's generally recommended that you decant starter wort before pitching. As long as you do that, it doesn't seem you should get any off flavors from it. I simply put some foil loosely over the top of the jug I make starters in.


2

You can get esters from under-pitching as well as high temperature control, so skipping the yeast starter will be much worse than a starter without temp control, since you will be significantly underpitching. I'm guessing the Trippel was a fairly big beer, for which you need a proportionally larger yeast starter and then some. A 1.080 beer would need a 4 ...


2

OK, a couple things. One, don't make a starter for dry yeast. It has many more cells than liquid so a starter isn't needed. In addition, dry yeast is coated with a nutrient and if you make a starter that nutrient won't be available in your beer. Second, the OG isn't all that high. A single pack of rehydrated dry yeast will be plenty. Make it easy on ...


2

1/2 gallon (~1900mL) will probably net you about 350bn cells (if you have a stir plate, yeast isn't too old, &c.). For 100L of ~1.040 wort, you want closer to 750bn cells (depending on gravity, assuming an ale). Use a pitch rate and starter calculator to get a better sense of your requirements for yeast and the the sizes/steps of starter needed to get ...


2

The conventional wisdom is to use starters, per the other answers here. I won't argue with that--there's certainly no harm in pitching a lot of healthy yeast. That said, I've gotten very good attenuation at times just pitching dry yeast. My last brew was 1.077 and I pitched one packet of US-05 (5 gallon batch). So far it has fermented to 1.006. Pretty good. ...


2

AFAIAC, any brew over 1.040 OG will benefit from a yeast starter.


1

Obviously you know now that you are under-pitching with the 1/2 gallon starter idea. For 100L you'd need several stir plates going really. IMO, the best bet would be to brew a standard 20L batch, then use that entire cake as the pitch for the 100L batch.


1

According to Mr Malty, you'd need about 1/3 of a pack for 1 gallon at 1.048 for direct pitching. The yeast will only remain highly viable for 2-4 weeks, though I've certainly pitched 6 month old washes that have functioned, though it was likely way under pitched. I would recommend using Mr Malty to determine how much to pitch in your 1 gallon batch (which ...


1

There is so little yeast in one of those packs that you'll have a really difficult time dividing it properly. You need to make a starter for any beer over 1.040 OG (despite what the yeast companies would have you believe). You ask if there's a practical solution and there really isn't a good way to do what you want to do. You could make a starter and save ...


1

As long as you pressure can it, you should be able to do what you propose.



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