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4

Smack packs contain yeast nutrients, and sugars nothing magical. Its just a mini starter in a bag for proofing yeast for direct pitching. Don't need it at all If doing your own starter. If you do all grain your wort has all the nutrients it needs. Sounds like your 1st stage went fine. I would just step up as normal. At the risk of infection just throw the ...


4

Strictly speaking, as long as you can ensure adequate and even oxygen contact with all of the yeast cells (a hard task, given the viscosity of yeast slurry), and provided the oxygenation comes directly before pitching, oxygenating the yeast/slurry itself is completely sufficient to provide for adequate growth in the following phase. Even more strictly ...


3

There's only so much oxygen that the N-hundred billion cells that you pitch can "hold". As well, there's only so much oxygen that can be diffused into the liquid containing those cells. And not only will those pitched cells need more oxygen, but their offspring cells will need oxygen, as well. As such, we oxygenate the wort, not just the pitch.


3

Increasing the innoculation rate alone will not necessarily result in a linear increase in cells. You'll have twice as many cells now competing for the same amount of sugars and nutrients, they may not be able to do as well. White and Zainasheff's Yeast has some empirical data about changing the innoculation rate by changing the volume of a starter, with a ...


2

With StarSan (really, with any no-rinse sanitizer), as long as you're using it at the prescribed dosage and draining your vessel well, there's absolutely no danger to your yeast. There would need to be a lot of sanitizer (like dumping your yeast straight into the sanitizing solution) to have an effect on it. Even that probably wouldn't kill it, though it ...


2

Monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate contain all the same chemical compounds (phosphate ions, ammonium ions, and hydrogen ions), the major difference is that MAP has a second hydrogen in place of the ammonium. So, if you buy food grade stuff, it should be totally safe to consume, however, pH is determined by those hydrogen ions, so your wine may ...


2

Have you taken a gravity reading? I've had starters that have very little apparent activity that are fermenting right along. It can be tricky to take a gravity sample for a low-volume starter, but with 3L you should have enough to work with to solve this problem w/o overly reducing your cell count. Also, is the starter on a stir-plate, shaken periodically or ...


1

That is a small batch 2.43 gallons. I too show a yeast viability at 56% Your starter volume of 300ml seems low. That is more of a proofing volume. My calculator shows 107bil cell growth if you use 1000ml starter (4oz DME) 1.040sg wort using NO stirplate. Stirplate will bump it up to 167bil cells. I wouldn't use a Stirplate in this case. Do a 1000ml ...


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Yes, it roughly lines up using my preferred calculator if I use the stir-plate aeration options (the "C.White" option has 124 bn cells, "Kai" has 95 bn cells). I'll note that the Brewer's Friend calculator does show 56% viability, or about 59 bn cells, not 36 bn. What sort of aeration method are you using for the starter? That has a huge impact on the ...


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No, it is not true. The "yield factor" of yeast is a function of both the starter volume and the inoculation rate.


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First off, it sounds like you're talking about step-propagation, not kräusening (which is adding actively-fermenting beer to end-fermented beer to induce a true secondary fermentation). I find the issue here a bit vague, because you don't mention whether you're comparing pitching the same number of cells in both cases (one actively fermenting, and the other ...


1

This is a very broad question but here's some direction: ...and the usefulness of this answer depends on whether you are planning on starting a long term barrel project or a medium term sour beer or a very quick sour batch... Something is growing, but it is certainly changing the ratios of different critters. My thinking would be to split the starter up ...


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No worries...05 will perform fine without anything special. Rehydrate it for best performance and then just toss it in. I've gone to 12% ABV with it with no issues. But my question is, how do you know it's the yeast? Why isn't it a fermentability of wort issues? Tell us more about your recipe and procedure in order to help figure out what's going on.


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I don't think that's unusual. I've had a similar experience where the starter overflowed massively and constantly, creating a huge mess. It didn't happen every time I made a starter, but twice was too much. I don't actually use my Erlenmeyer flask anymore because of this. I may someday buy another 3 liter flask, but in the meantime I've reserved a growler ...


1

It is not unusual. I'd easily believe that a 1.5L starter would overfill a 2L erlenmeyer at full krausen. I would suggest using an anti-foam agent in the future. I regularly do 1.6L starters in a 2L erlenmeyer w/o any hesitation or foam-over, due to the introductions of 1-2 drops of liquid simethicone (baby anti-gas drops), available in your local ...


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If you pitch before the yeast had a chance to finish fermenting, you're pitching a less than optimal amount of yeast. Also, depending on the OG of the wort you grew your starter in, you may have suboptimal cell count and health. These also look like pretty small starters for lager.


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If possible, you should always crash and decant the bland, unhopped starter beer. But especially for lagers, where the starter volume is usually larger to get a larger cell count. At the same time, ~1.7L into ~19L is only ~10%, it won't affect the batch too much. Also, lager yeasts do have a full range of flocculation characteristics, they're not ...



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