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7

Without pressure canning, unfermented wort doesn't have a low enough pH to be shelf stable. From The Maltose Falcons website: The process is almost identical to the one that you or your family may have used to preserve peaches, tomatoes, pickles, etc. The normal preservation method is hot water bath canning, but since wort is a low acid food you must ...


5

Sanitation is not sterilization. You might find a couple jars out of a batch last longer than others. But the only way to be sure is to buy a pressure canner. They are relatively cheap and can be used in the kitchen later for cooking as well. Mason jars make great containers, but lets not lose site of what they are really made for... sterile canning. In ...


2

Airlock activity is not the be-all end-all. You could have a bad seal on a bucket or on the airlock grommet itself. Give it a little time (3-4 days) then check the gravity. Gravity movement is really the only 100% reliable way to test if the yeast is working.


2

Yeah, unless you actually pressure seal those bad boys, I wouldn't risk it. My rule of thumb is to weigh out the possible benefits and down falls of taking a shortcut. The upside could be saving a few minutes of heating then an hour of two (where you don't have to be around or do anything) waiting for it to cool. The down side is very high - at best, you ...


1

It's much simpler to use 1/2 gallon or gallon plastic juice bottles. Freeze or refridgerate the boiled wort. When using I bring my starter flask of wort to boil for a few minutes, chill and inoculate. I get that mason jars at cellar temps would save fridge space, but if you use larger bottles keeping a couple gallons of wort in the back of the ...



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