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Here is a link to a document written by Steve Piatz who was the AHA mead maker of the year a few years ago. The method is often referred to as the staggered nutrient addition method. The types of nutrients typically used are Yeast Energizer which contains diammonium phosphate(DAP) and fermaid K or Nutriferm Advance which are similar nutrient blends. The ...


4

BYO has a pretty good, brief article on what yeast nutrient provides for your beer, as well as whether or not it's necessary. To summarize for you, wort by itself is pretty rich in nutrient, and may not need yeast nutrient, especially if you re-pitch yeast from a previous batch (proper amounts of slurry, of course). The one nutrient that is not present in ...


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Yeast nutrient is used primarily to ensure a strong fermentation and is typically added toward the end of boil. Yeast accelerator is used to fix a stalled fermentation. Each contains various ingredients like phosphates and minerals to help in these cases.


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you can boil half a sachet of yeast and add that to the must. It provides many of the trace elements needed by the yeast, but I'm not sure how much nitrogen it provides, which is the key nutrient required in mead. If the mead is not very strong, you can in fact successfully ferment without nutrient, just pitch 50% extra yeast.


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For starter wort you can use the 1/2 tsp and a sachet of yeast hulls, although I usually double this, just to make sure the yeast have all they need. I've even used 1/2 tsp in a single 1 quart starter with no ill effects. The yeast hulls are necessary since they contain trace elements that are essential for the yeast. The diammonium phosphate is only ...


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Also keep in mind that mead long predates yeast nutrients. The old Greek formula went something like: Put three parts water and one part honey in an amphora in the sun for a few days. Enjoy. That must have been some sweet, syrupy mead. However, the point is that if you can't get the yeast nutrients, you can always try brewing mead without them. FWIW I ...


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I first saw this method in The Compleat MeadMaker by Ken Schramm. It seems northern-brewer-chris also uses a method that's similar. Ever since I read this, I've been practicing it and I've never looked back. I can finish a clean (not hot) mead fermentation in 6-8 weeks now instead of the accepted, ambiguous "months". I still spend a good bit of time aging ...


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I'd do the packet. I suppose you run the risk of over pitching, but unlikely. Make sure you rehydrate if the instructions tell you to. On the nutrient, I'd just do a teaspoon. Looks like some people advocate one teaspoon per gallon.


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It's generally recommended that you decant starter wort before pitching. As long as you do that, it doesn't seem you should get any off flavors from it. I simply put some foil loosely over the top of the jug I make starters in.


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Wort is what determines fermentability in general, not yeast. Almost any ale yeast can easily ferment a 10+% beer. But if you don't make a fermentable wort, the yeast doesn't matter. Many times extract beers are less fermentable due to the way the extract is made. An all grain beer mashed at a high temperature or with large amounts of less fermentable ...


1

White labs Super High Gravity (WLP099) yeast claims to be alcohol tolerant up to 25% ABV. Normally most ale yeast shouldn't have a problem with 1.074 sg. Perhaps a yeast starter or better temperature control is needed. But for a stuck fermentation right now pitch some champagne yeast. It won't mess with the flavor and is great to get the gravity down. It ...


1

5.8% ABV is not considered "higher gravity". There should be no problem S-04 or most any dry or liquid yeast up until closer to 10% ABV. It sounds like your fermentation is either stuck or simply not complete. When did you brew? What size packet of S-04? Did you pitch the whole packet? What fermentation temperature? Did you do anything for ...


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It's said that lemon juice and raisins can provide nutrients to the yeast. Despite the fact that "yeast nutrient" is an ingredient in the dandelion wine recipe I'm using, so are lemon pulp and raisins, so maybe it will be okay in the end. My official answer is 2 Tbsp of brewer's yeast. Time will tell...


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Servomyces is simply dead yeast. Prior to being killed, it was fed micronutrients which have been stored in the yeast. There's no harm pitching more into your starter, assuming you then later pitch to 5 gallons or more. If your starter yeast don't use all the nutrients, your main brew certainly will, so there's no harm pitching the entire capsule. The White ...


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I agree with the "leave it alone" advice. Between the extract and the dark grains, you had a fair amount of unfermentables in there which is likely what's responsible. BTW, I see you pitched at 75F. Your beer will probably turn out much better of you'd get the temp down another 10F before pitching.


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I would not mess around with it. Looking at the recipe I don't think you would expect to much more of a gravity change. Normally I advocate leaving any beer in primary for 14 days. And then a beer with this starting gravity would defenitaly be fine for 14 days. Your recipe has a fair amount of darker specialty grains in it and that will contribute to the ...



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