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18

Is any of the advanced equipment really necessary? No, not strictly. But like any hobby, as we advance we acquire more gear. Regarding the chiller in particular, if you are performing partial boils of 3 gallons or less, then you can definitely get by without a chiller. I did just fine. But once I switched to all grain and the full-volume boils that ...


17

There are a few methods, each with advantages and drawbacks. Cool your Kettle Take your hot brew kettle, full of wort, and submerge it in ice water. Advantages: No real equipment expense, just take your pot and put it in a cooler or bathtub full of ice water. Drawbacks: Extremely slow, higher risk of contamination. Probably have to change out the ice ...


16

So it turns out: The proper amount of oxygen dissolved in wort is 8-10 ppm. Shaking typically yields around 4 ppm. It's possible to achieve as much as 8 ppm with plenty of headspace and LOTS of vigorous shaking. As an example, 5 minutes of shaking a 1.077 wort may only achieve 2.7 ppm. Siphon sprayers will be in the same range. Air with an Oxygen Stone ...


14

Boiling is a fairly poorly understood process. That being said here is what I know. Partial-wort Boil Ups You probably already have all the necessary equipment Small footprint Easy to manage You can use your kettle for other things Downs Hop utilization suffers, meaning you must use more hops to get the same level of bitterness There is a limit to ...


12

When calculating sugars used in the wort, how much sugar does honey contain? Is it closer to dry malt extracts, raw cane sugar, dextrose? Honey is loaded with fermentable sugar (think mead...), though not as much as malt extracts. There are "adjuncts" within the honey as well. But you can yet a near-even yield from honey as you could from dry ...


11

Whirlpool chilling utlilizes a pump and an immersion chiller. Many brewers that have an immersion chiller will find that an upgrade to a pump for other uses allows them to get better chilling from the immersion chiller. A whirlpool chiller uses a pump to pull wort from the base of the kettle, then returns the wort to the top of the kettle. The return is ...


10

Pour the wort from the kettle into the primary through a colander. The hops get caught in the colander, and the wort dripping through this aerates it.


9

3 common ways include: 1. calibrated dipstick or spoon (easiest) Before your next brew session, take a 1 gallon pitcher or some other known volume vessel. One gallon at a time, pour the water into your kettle, let it settle, then put the dipstick or spoon in. Mark the top of the wet line with a sharpie or craft knife. Repeat for each gallon. Measuring ...


9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


7

It means putting an addition of hops at flameout, or when you turn off the kettle. Those late addition hops can add hop aroma and some nice flavor. I wouldn't take your hops out when the boil is done for hoppy beers. Leaving those hops in while the wort cools can give you more of that aroma that some styles call for. Jamil Zainasheff has some tips for Hop ...


7

You should if you can. The advantages are a faster brew-day, a shorter window of potential wort contamination, and a better cold break. (Depending on the method, you might also get improved clarity due to whirlpooling trub and break material that you would then not siphon in the primary fermenter. See How do you cool wort?


6

Doing a full-wort boil (all 5 gallons) offers a few technical advantages over partial-wort boils. There are a number of reactions that depend on the concentration of wort. First, the wort-darkening reactions are more pronounced at a smaller volume meaning your wort will come out a little darker than you expect. Second and more importantly, the rate of hop ...


6

I can only answer the first part of your question. The sugars in honey vary depending on the type. If you really want to know the contributions you should make a measurement. Specific gravity is a measure of points per pound per gallon (ppg). All you need do is take a pound of honey, add pure water until you have a gallon and measure with a hydrometer. ...


6

To quote from http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_oxygenation.cfm: It was concluded that pumping compressed air through a stone is not an efficient way to provide adequate levels of DO. Traditional splashing and shaking, although laborious, is fairly efficient at dissolving up to 8 ppm oxygen. To increase levels of oxygen, the carboy headspace can be purged with ...


6

You may get a "wet cardboard" or "sherry" flavor from oxidation, if it is bad enough. The real problem with oxidation is long-term stability. If you plan to drink your beer soon, it may not matter much. If you are going to age your beer for a while, you may experience staling reactions that will create these off-flavors. It is important to know when you ...


6

Despite the Wikipedia page for Maillard Reactions currently saying that Maillard Reactions require low moisture, alkaline conditions, and temperatures well above the boiling point of water, Maillard reactions can happen outside of those conditions. For instance, tanning lotions utilize a Maillard reaction, and I'm fairly certain women wouldn't use them if ...


6

I don't think you have to worry about being harmed by the beer, but you probably should worry about the flavor. If there's mold on top, I'd toss it.


6

I would get the wort into the fermenter with the yeast and then carefully transport it. Then you don't have to worry about the wort getting contaminated as much due to the airlock on the fermenter. The head space should be able to handle the sloshing from moving it (I am assuming that this is in a car). I would just make sure that it isn't going to go ...


6

Too soon. Don't sweat it. I bet it will lighten up as it ferments and yeast and trub drop.


6

You'll be fine, as long as there isn't some obvious source contaminating the snow - like if it's actually falling off of a tree or roof and not coming directly from the clouds. Snow is basically freeze distilled so it's pretty clean. I suppose if it's coming down very hard and several inches of snow fall in there it could it could dilute it a little bit, ...


6

Your hydrometer has been calibrated to give readings at a specific temperature. Depending on the temp when you first read it and the temp after cooling a two point difference is not that surprising. If you look closely at the hydrometer, it will tell you the calibration temperature of your hydrometer. They are normally done somewhere around 60, 65 or 68F. ...


6

The sludge is mostly coagulated proteins, hop residue. A little bit is actually good for your wort, as it provides nutrients for the yeast. Too much might give the beer some slight off flavours. If you were to let the sludge into the fermenter, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but you'll make better beer if your exclude most of it. So, to answer your ...


5

It helps to get the wort moving around to cool evenly. You run the risk of introducing contaminates from the air or stirring utensil, but it's pretty low. Use a sanitized or boiled spoon.


5

Get the right crush This is the single most important thing to prevent a stuck sparge. Read the HomebrewTalk's wiki page on evaluating the crush. An ideal milling breaks the internal bits of grain into a coarse powder while leaving the bulk of the husks intact. It is the husks that do the most to set up a good filter. full size Use a good manifold ...


5

First wort hopping is the practice of adding hops to kettle when you take first runnings from the mash tun. As the kettle fills you heat the wort to boiling. The "boil hops" are in the kettle before the boil begins and steep in the warm wort. The best way to carry this over to extract brewing would be to add your first hops to the kettle when the wort ...


5

One of the quickest solution I have used in a pinch is to blow air back up my exit tube from the mash tun. This tends to dislodge some of the spent grains collected in or on the sparge manifold (regardless of the type you are using). Then a quick stir and recirculate and often I am back in business. The next step after blow back is to thin the mash a bit ...


5

You most certainly can do a decoction at home. And decoction does more than just increase the temperature of the mash. The primary reason for it is melanoidin production in the wort. This creates a complexity of malt flavors in the wort that might not be there otherwise. I have several friends that have done it. Watching it being done its not hard, just ...


5

Sloppy Pouring. When my boil's done and cooled, I pour it between the carboy and my bottling bucket a few times, making sure it gets well-splashed. If you're doing a partial boil, you can often ignore aerating the wort, and just pour the extra water around to aerate, then add that to the wort in the fermenter. According to Palmer, this will get you to ...


5

I used to do the same thing but recently have found these bags http://www.northernbrewer.com/default/large-straining-bag-18-3-4-x-19.html I get the one that is big enough to fit in the bucket and stretch it over the top. I then simply pour the whole boil kettle into the bucket and lift the bag out. The mesh on these is finer than the hop sacks I have been ...


5

Hop bags are the answer. I use hop bags. You can use multiple hop bags for your multiple hop additions. I tie them to the handle of the brew kettle so they don't come open during the boil. You may want to up the hop quantities a touch (10%?) because you get slightly lower utilization in hop bags. When it's time for racking, chill the wort and then pull the ...



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