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7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


4

Yes, is is a problem. After primary fermentation, one of the most important staling agents your homebrew will face is oxygen. Pouring will almost guarantee the introduction of oxygen, whereas siphoning minimizes it.


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


3

Raisins are dried grapes, containing around 65 % sugar by weight, and all that grape flavor in concentrated and slightly modified form. They add sugar, body, and flavor to the wine. If a recipe calls for raisins, there may be varying reasons why. In this case, I would believe that the raisins are included for all three reasons listed here. Although I have ...


3

Turns out that, at least in my case, freezing the dry yeast is actually a bad idea. I made an experiment last night and I put two sachets of ICV D-47 in the freezer and two sachets in the fridge. This morning I took both of them out and let them warm up in the room. I used the same activating mixture I've always used (some must + some nutrients) and split ...


2

There is some risk of infection by beer-dwelling organisms, especially souring bacteria. Sanitation is less critical after primary, but if you want to be certain, clean utensils with something food-safe like Star San.


2

Monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate contain all the same chemical compounds (phosphate ions, ammonium ions, and hydrogen ions), the major difference is that MAP has a second hydrogen in place of the ammonium. So, if you buy food grade stuff, it should be totally safe to consume, however, pH is determined by those hydrogen ions, so your wine may ...


2

All fruit has naturally occurring yeast on the skin. This is almost certainly why your strawberry wine starting fermenting spontaneously. Some winemakers (but not me!) prefer to let the wild yeast on the grape skins ferment the juice. More information here.


2

tl;dr - Yes. It is definitely possible for wine bottles to break or explode, but I've seen many more stories of homebrewers having the corks pop out. I have, however, personally witnessed a commercial "organic," "no sulfites added" wine blow out the bottom of its bottle sitting on the shelf in a grocery store. Most likely, this depends on how secure the ...


1

My experience with mead is that you should wait. What I do personnally is I bottle (I use twist-cap bottles which are not really air-tight), wait a few months and then siphon again to clean bottles, leaving just a bit more dead yeast at the bottom. My mead usually becomes really clear after about 8 months, and stops tasting yeasty at the same time. It's ...


1

There are several issues with attempting to ferment with wild yeast. I've not tried it but here are a few things I've heard from people who have. If you get good results, it is unlikely that you can repeat the process. Know what you are getting is a nice feature of prepackaged yeast. The wild yeast may not be alcohol tolerant. i.e. They may die off when ...


1

My initial guess was the Campden tablet's SO2 was the culprit and hunting around for similar stories I found this on a home brew forum: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=267418 Observations in this thread would seem to fit with what you have experienced.


1

Grape skins have wild yeast on them that will, in time, ferment the grape juice. Depending on the particular blend of yeast on your grapes, you may get complete fermentation, or the yeast may have low alcohol tolerance and the fermentation will halt before all the sugars have been consumed. Yeast contribute to the flavour profile of the wine, and ...


1

In the past I've only gotten bombs when I had put too much sugar into the bottle when conditioning, and it has always happened within a week or 2. I think also with wine bottles being a thick as they are they are a bit tougher. If you haven't added extra sugar for bottle carbonation then there must've been some residual left in there when you bottled the ...


1

If you want a crystal clear finish then unfortunately you will have to add more finings and rack again.


1

What you're describing is called a colony of cells called a pellicle. According to Home Brew Talk's wiki: A pellicle is a lumpy, slimy white film that is formed by some strains of wild yeast, notably brettanomyces, during fermentation. A film on your beer in the fermenter or the bottle almost always indicates an infection, unless you have ...


1

The theory is that by making several sugar additions mid-fermentation instead of front-loading all of the sugar is that it will not shock/stress the yeast outright in the beginning by the high amount of sugar, and will allow the yeast to re-produce in a more hospitable environment, since alcohol (in high amounts) is toxic to yeast. With that in mind, you ...


1

I have never head this before, and after looking around quite a bit I couldn't find any evidence to support (or even suggest) the link. Only thing I can think of is either: this refers to a non S. cerevisiae yeast (maybe Brett or some other wild yeast), though I couldn't find any evidence of that either; or, some other substance beneficial to yeast happens ...


1

You don't mention specifics of sanitation in your description above, but you do mention the "warming" of some of the raw juice to desolve extra sugar. This implies that the rest of your raw juice was not warmed. Was all of the raw juice ever boiled to remove the natural yeast and other fawna from the skins? If not, your medium sherry might be the result ...


1

It does seem like your rapid staling could easily be due to oxygen exposure. To protect against this, you'd have to find a way to agitate it under an inert gas atmosphere (after primary is perfect since the head space in your fermenter is pure CO2, if you don't take lids or airlocks off). Otherwise you'll just be whipping/splashing/stirring air into the ...


1

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


1

The best thing you can do now is wait. Chances are the yeast are still actively metabolizing sugars, albeit a bit slower than earlier in the fermentation. Check it in a week, and if the gravity hasn't dropped significantly, consider pitching a fresh packet of yeast. What you don't want to do is bottle the wine now. If fermentation is, as I suspect, ...


1

According to jackkeller.net, the action of pectic enzymes is reduced by high levels of sulphur dioxide. The gases dissipate after the addition of the campden tablets, which is the reason for recommending to wait 12 hours before adding the enzymes. (Whether the enzymes are actually denatured by the sulphur dioxide is somewhat unclear.)


1

Your must is basically simple sugar and entirely fermentable. Your temps may be a little high so the yeast worked quickly. I'd be sure to leave the whole thing for a couple weeks to allow the yeast time to clean up some of the bi-products of fermentation. Then I'd rack to a new container for a longer aging period. Taste it then to see how it tastes. If ...


1

I have limited experience with fermenting fruits except for the orange mead I make. I recently made a batch that I left on the fruit for more than 3 months. It tastes fantastic and is perfectly clear, bottling it this weekend. As long as you pasteurized the pulp and made sure everything was clean and sanitary, then I don't see how it could be messed up. You ...


1

When making beer, wine, or mead, there is nothing that you can't not sanitize. It takes all of 5-10 minutes to stir up a batch of One-Step or Star San and sanitize your equipment, and it pretty greatly reduces your chances of contamination (assuming proper handling of the equipment). While the alcohol content should kill bacteria, sanitizer will.


1

I have been making wine for many years and recently beer. I always sanitize anything that may come in contact with the wine or beer at any point in the process. Contamination is something cannot be undone, you are better safe than sorry.


1

I always wash my test equipment like I wash any other kitchen utensils.


1

Once you get to the last few bottles of a kit, maybe six months to a year after it was made, you'll kick yourself for drinking the others too early. Wine needs time, simple answer to your question. But as was stated earlier, its marketing, by the kit companies. I never had a kit that didnt improve with time.


1

Getting ABV at that level is possible through distillation process. Although it won't be classified as wine anymore if the ABV is 60%. Here you go to get started making wine. You can know how much yeast should be used at that tutorial as well. We can make wine using either brewer or baking yeast and it's drinkable, but you won't get optimal result if ...



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