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4

Using any of those things to filter beer will badly oxidize it and ruin the flavor. I clear beer with time and cold temperature. A couple months at 35F will clear just about any beer. You can also use things like gelatin, Polyclar, or Biofine. If you want to filter you needs kegs and a CO2 setup to push the beer so you can do it in an enclosed manner and ...


4

Yes, is is a problem. After primary fermentation, one of the most important staling agents your homebrew will face is oxygen. Pouring will almost guarantee the introduction of oxygen, whereas siphoning minimizes it.


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


3

Turns out that, at least in my case, freezing the dry yeast is actually a bad idea. I made an experiment last night and I put two sachets of ICV D-47 in the freezer and two sachets in the fridge. This morning I took both of them out and let them warm up in the room. I used the same activating mixture I've always used (some must + some nutrients) and split ...


3

Raisins are dried grapes, containing around 65 % sugar by weight, and all that grape flavor in concentrated and slightly modified form. They add sugar, body, and flavor to the wine. If a recipe calls for raisins, there may be varying reasons why. In this case, I would believe that the raisins are included for all three reasons listed here. Although I have ...


3

Bulk aging has one advantage over bottle aging, it ages much faster. Once in the bottle, wine will still age, but less. Also, if you add Potasium Metabisulfate right before you bottle it will stop the yeast. A big way fermented beverages age(not distilled) is from the yeast still living. This will lessen the aging process. Overall: Do what tastes the ...


3

Use Cold crashing so the yeast and other undesirables fall out of suspension and to the bottom of the vessel. Finings is another way clarify and drop out the undesirables from suspension in the fluid. Then Rack in to a new vessel, you transfer the from one vessel to another gently with a siphon of some description and leave behind the sediment ...


2

Primarily its a subject of dietary preference to avoid additional sodium in the diet. However, its a moot point because generally a very small amount of sodium would be being added. Also potassium has a somewhat higher flavor threshold than sodium. Meaning sodium begins to taste saltier sooner than potassium. (at least this is the case on my palate) ...


2

Well, theoretically you can add any kind of yeast to any kind of grape extract and, provided conditions are sanitary, you don't get an infection, and you give it enough time to ferment, you will have a wine of some sort. Unfortunately, it probably won't be very good. In fact, it will probably be horrible. To make drinkable wine will require proper juice, ...


2

To Exactly answer your questions: Is it possible, Does anyone know the process? Yes, you would have to ferment some wine then add a very high ABV% of Alcohol, acquired, paid or distilled by another means. Example ratio: 300ml of 10% wine + 700ml of 80% spirit = 59%ABV How much yeast, should I use in the grape juice? Go for 1 tsp per gallon(4.5L). can I ...


2

I don't believe most wine makers make these decisions up front, at least not for juice that they have not worked with before. Instead, you taste the wine at packaging time and then adjust accordingly with glycerin for sweetness or acids for tartness. Commercial producers may blend finished wines, but ultimately it involves tasting throughout the whole ...


2

I believe that the short answer is yes, artificial light can cause sun damage too. Ultra-violet light is cited as the primary spectrum/wavelength/frequency that has the biggest impact, and while direct sunlight is going to have much more of it and therefore be more detrimental over time, light bulbs generally emit a certain amount of UV too. From what I've ...


1

According to jackkeller.net, the action of pectic enzymes is reduced by high levels of sulphur dioxide. The gases dissipate after the addition of the campden tablets, which is the reason for recommending to wait 12 hours before adding the enzymes. (Whether the enzymes are actually denatured by the sulphur dioxide is somewhat unclear.)


1

Your must is basically simple sugar and entirely fermentable. Your temps may be a little high so the yeast worked quickly. I'd be sure to leave the whole thing for a couple weeks to allow the yeast time to clean up some of the bi-products of fermentation. Then I'd rack to a new container for a longer aging period. Taste it then to see how it tastes. If ...


1

What you're describing is called a colony of cells called a pellicle. According to Home Brew Talk's wiki: A pellicle is a lumpy, slimy white film that is formed by some strains of wild yeast, notably brettanomyces, during fermentation. A film on your beer in the fermenter or the bottle almost always indicates an infection, unless you have ...


1

The theory is that by making several sugar additions mid-fermentation instead of front-loading all of the sugar is that it will not shock/stress the yeast outright in the beginning by the high amount of sugar, and will allow the yeast to re-produce in a more hospitable environment, since alcohol (in high amounts) is toxic to yeast. With that in mind, you ...


1

I have limited experience with fermenting fruits except for the orange mead I make. I recently made a batch that I left on the fruit for more than 3 months. It tastes fantastic and is perfectly clear, bottling it this weekend. As long as you pasteurized the pulp and made sure everything was clean and sanitary, then I don't see how it could be messed up. You ...


1

There is some risk of infection by beer-dwelling organisms, especially souring bacteria. Sanitation is less critical after primary, but if you want to be certain, clean utensils with something food-safe like Star San.


1

I always wash my test equipment like I wash any other kitchen utensils.


1

Once you get to the last few bottles of a kit, maybe six months to a year after it was made, you'll kick yourself for drinking the others too early. Wine needs time, simple answer to your question. But as was stated earlier, its marketing, by the kit companies. I never had a kit that didnt improve with time.


1

Getting ABV at that level is possible through distillation process. Although it won't be classified as wine anymore if the ABV is 60%. Here you go to get started making wine. You can know how much yeast should be used at that tutorial as well. We can make wine using either brewer or baking yeast and it's drinkable, but you won't get optimal result if ...


1

Buy some wine yeast - don't use bread yeast - wine yeast is more alcohol tolerant and will give you the best chance of producing something like wine. But even so, nowhere near 60% - most yeasts stop around 14-18 percent abv.


1

If you take gravity readings, you'll notice that the final gravity is extremely low. Cider is notorious for fermenting very low, and you're adding to it by tossing in sugars which are 100% fermentable (meaning that 100% of the sweetness will ferment out). The reason it is "watery" on your palette is because there is no sweetness. I'd be willing to be you ...


1

Early on, I made a number of fruit wines and I found my initial attempts produced a very thin, light bodied wine with marginal flavors similar to the experiences you're having with your batch of blueberry wine. It takes a significant amount of ripe fruit to produce strong flavors in fruit wines. Also, yeast selection is important, as well as keeping your ...


1

Add blueberry honey. It's a great way to reintroduce the floral blueberry flavors and aromas that often get lost during fermentation. The added sweetness is likely to improve your perception of "fruitiness" as well.


1

You'll need basic equipment: fermenting bucket or carboy airlock tools to get the juice out of the fruit (can be as simple as cheese cloth to squeeze the fruit or as fancy as a juicer) hose for racking For each batch: lots of fruit, preferably cheap wine yeast normal table sugar for some fruit: antigel to prevent gelation for some fruit: acid A web ...


1

I believe the main reason for topping off wine is to reduce headspace. This is only necessary after initial fermentation, when the CO2 produced wards off Oxygen. Wine is very susceptible to oxidation. However, if you have the wine in a carboy already, use instinct to think about how much you will disturb the wine by topping off. I think people normally top ...


1

Baker's yeast is not bred for producing rice wine which is high in alchohol. You should try using some yeast that was bred specifically for that purpose. I don't know if you want to make something like sake (not all rice wines = sake), but the major American yeast suppliers both sell high quality yeasts made specifically for sake. Wyeast sake #9 White ...


1

Depending on the fermentation temprature etc then fermentation will take a different amount of time. On average all of the wine I make ferments out to around 12% dry in around 5/7Days. If you have left it a month then im sure it will be done by now. Unless there has been any problems with the fermentation pausing. Get yourself a hydrometer from a homebrew ...



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