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6

Depends on batch size. If your doing 2-3 gallons. I would recommend using glass 1 gallon jugs from wine or Apple juice. The cheeseball containers I believe are made from the same foodgrade plastic as 2 liter soda bottles. They are novel in that they have more volume and a large opening for dry hopping. I think either would be a good fermentor untill you ...


6

If you live near a good juice bar or restuarant that serves smoothies, ask the sales clerk if they have any empty glass jugs. Many drinks have an apple juice base and organic apple juice often ships in 1 gallon glass jugs. I've found two shops that happily give the jugs away for free, though I usually buy a smoothie in gratitude. Being a tipping patron ...


4

Recipe: Grape Juice Yeast Making wine is more about process than recipe. With the exception of quality ingredients. Standard table grapes don't really make decent wine. This becomes incredibly apparent when you actually taste the juice from a true wine grape. I've dabbled in some wine making all from kits of different grape musts. When you taste the ...


4

Make sure you have a healthy yeast in the proper pitch amount. Ferment primary at the cold end of the yeast strains tolerance. A long secondary / aging helps break down fusel alcohols. Yeast needs nutrients and oxygen mainly for their growth phase. This can be substituted by pitching a massive amount of yeast. For example pitching wort on top of a yeast ...


3

You need to upgrade your equipment by a few dollars. Get yourself what's called a "racking cane". Your siphon tubing attaches to it. Because it is stiff you have better control of the end of the tube, as well they come with caps to help redirect the pull from upward rather than sucking up all the less. It's ok to suck up a tiny bit if you put the racking ...


3

I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


3

You absolutely can. I do it all the time and have done it dozens of times. No problem at all.


3

Your wine should be fine. The alcohol and the acidity should be high enough to kill all the bugs.


3

As Pepi noted in the comments it would take a serious infection to be noticeable in 24 hours (Just think how long it takes yeast to get going and that is supplied into fermentable at a huge number of cells. First and foremost I recommend moving to an acid based no-rise sanitiser. Starsan is the common brand but other unbranded and just as good alternatives ...


3

Simply exposing a wine that was inoculated with wine yeast to oxygen doesn't create acetic acid. You need to inoculate with some acetic acid bacteria as well. Acetic acid bacteria can ferment both sugars and ethanol to make acetic acid. I have made red wine before, and I have pulled a gallon of partially fermented wine, inoculated with acetobacter and ...


3

I got a little carried away here, so here's a quick summary. TL;DR: Your yeast was probably either A) nutrient starved, B) Fermenting at too high of a temperature, or C) a combination of both. Regardless of your temperature control situation, I think A (nutrition) is the most likely cuplrit here. While it's true that some yeast strains are more prone to ...


3

I have tested this personally and have not been able to record any perceivable differences in SG readings. Sometimes degassing will invigorate a slow ferment but nothing more than a good stir would. I do see your math behind the ABV increase and I still believe that to be true as well. Degassing is something you should be doing throughout primary and into ...


2

The article linked here suggests getting very young walnuts before you have to shell them; and instead quartering the young walnuts. They also suggest here leaving it 40 days, 52 days or 3 months; so, leaving at least 40 days seems to be a cunning plan. http://www.williamrubel.com/delicous-vin-de-noix/ I hope this helps.


2

Are you starting a brew or finishing one off? Rule of thumb to keep handy when using any kind of enzyme in brewing; enzymes are proteins and proteins don’t mix well with bentonite or with sulfur dioxide. Always wait at least 12 hours, like your package directions dictate, between using sulfur dioxide and one of the other two products. In your particular ...


2

we just corked a screw top wine bottle with no problem what so ever. we also uncorked the bottle with no issues at all. We will definitely be corking larger amounts of screw tops in the future! Thanks to everyone for the great advice on this topic as well, happy winemaking!


2

Campden tablets are usually Potassium Metabisulfite .It works by depriving organisms of oxygen, kinda like how halon puts a fire out. For yeast it means it doesn't have what it needs so it's waiting, doesn't kill it. I've made cider from juice that used Potassium Metabisulfide as a preservative, fermination would only start once the preservative was ...


2

The temperature could be a factor, make sure your bottles are stored at a correct temperature (see the yeast package for ideal temperature). It is possible that the SO2 did not evaporate as much as expected? There are kits that you can buy to measure sulfites in wine : Titrets It is also possible that the yeast in the bottles did not get enough oxygen to ...


2

When I think of "raking to a secondary" I can think of two reasons you would want to do this. #1-Clarity; racking gives the beverage more time for sediment to settle out. #2-Aging; depending on the beverage racking give it more time to age.


2

If the yeast proofed when hydrating it should be fine. More detail of your must would help. If you used bottled Apple juice it may have a yeast inhibiting preservative. Update: if you're sure there are no preservatives, something else is inhibiting the yeast growth. Yeast health, it may be dead. Repitch New yeast (check expiration date). Make sure proof ...


2

Check at your local bakery. Most of them get frosting in 5-10lb buckets. These are (obviously) food grade and have a good seal. Likely they will simply give them to you if you ask. You might have to enlist some small children to help you get the last of the frosting out of the bucket :), but after that and a good rinse with hot water all you have to do is ...


2

There are a lot of good answers here, but I'd like to chime in with my favorite small-batch fermenter. For small, 1-gallon batches, I like to use 4L glass wine jugs (I typically use Carlo Rossi, but any brand will do as long as it's glass). Since the jugs are a little larger than 1 gallon, they also offer a bit of extra headspace, so you can actually start ...


2

Methanol is formed when fermenting beverages high in pectins - eg grapes and berries. The methanol comes from the pectin, which mainly composed of methyl esters of galactose. When pectin breaks down, by enzymes introduced by micro organisms, or deliberately introduced, the methyl esters combine with water to produce methanol, so the aim should be to leave ...


2

Some yeast strains give sulfur smell during fermentation. That's perfectly normal. If it's in the air, it's no longer in your brew! The fact you can smell it so strongly indicates it is, literally, going away now. It comes from metabolism of sulfur amino-acids. Sooner they are degenerated and sulfur is released, the less chance it'll get released in the ...


2

As always, it depends. Boiling uncovered makes mineral content higher, but lets volatile components to evaporate. Boiling covered - opposite. We don't know what's in your water, so we can't reliably tell which is better. Ideally, mineral content is low, and your water supply uses ozone instead of chlorine-based substances to prevent bacteria growth - then, ...


1

My friend has tried this with Concord grapes and it was okay. The recipe he used was on this page: "https://www.baderbrewing.com/content/how-make-wine-concord-table-grapes" Good luck!


1

I tried once to make a small quantity of wine from grapes I found in a grocery store. I had big hopes because they got a type of grapes that looked a lot like wine grapes (very dark and small). Even thought my process was good (already made wine from wine grapes), the end result was not good. So that means the grapes really need to be wine grapes. Make an ...


1

Before you adjust acidity, allow the fermentation to stop completely, and let the wine degas it's co2. Carbon dioxide in suspension increases acidity of a fluid. If you still feel it needs a reduction in acidity, cold stabilize the wine at just above freezing for a few weeks to let some of the tartaric acid to precipitate out of the wine. If you like to ...


1

Aging in the carboy or demijohn or whatever is called bulk aging. Once it's bottled, it's called bottle aging. As you have noticed, it's different, and primarily results from the volume of the container. Large containers age slower than smaller ones, however you want to bulk age so it's all aging together before you divide it out into individual bottles. ...


1

The first time I read the question, I didn't realize that you where pouring the wine directly from the carboy... Escoce answer is good, a racking can is a must have, but I would like to add a few more tips: When you last rack your wine, leave your carboy where you need it to be for racking, if possible (at some sufficient height and already tilted if you ...


1

Depends on the yeast, really. Krausen in wine may be thin to nonexistent. Bubbling may be slow. If your installation is not exactly airtight, you may never see a bubble. I wouldn't expect any signs before 8 hours. Wouldn't worry before 24 to 48 hours (depending on temperature), and wouldn't try to intervene before 3 days. After 3 days, if you still don't ...



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