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7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


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You absolutely can. I do it all the time and have done it dozens of times. No problem at all.


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Your wine should be fine. The alcohol and the acidity should be high enough to kill all the bugs.


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As Pepi noted in the comments it would take a serious infection to be noticeable in 24 hours (Just think how long it takes yeast to get going and that is supplied into fermentable at a huge number of cells. First and foremost I recommend moving to an acid based no-rise sanitiser. Starsan is the common brand but other unbranded and just as good alternatives ...


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You need to upgrade your equipment by a few dollars. Get yourself what's called a "racking cane". Your siphon tubing attaches to it. Because it is stiff you have better control of the end of the tube, as well they come with caps to help redirect the pull from upward rather than sucking up all the less. It's ok to suck up a tiny bit if you put the racking ...


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I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


2

we just corked a screw top wine bottle with no problem what so ever. we also uncorked the bottle with no issues at all. We will definitely be corking larger amounts of screw tops in the future! Thanks to everyone for the great advice on this topic as well, happy winemaking!


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Monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate contain all the same chemical compounds (phosphate ions, ammonium ions, and hydrogen ions), the major difference is that MAP has a second hydrogen in place of the ammonium. So, if you buy food grade stuff, it should be totally safe to consume, however, pH is determined by those hydrogen ions, so your wine may ...


2

All fruit has naturally occurring yeast on the skin. This is almost certainly why your strawberry wine starting fermenting spontaneously. Some winemakers (but not me!) prefer to let the wild yeast on the grape skins ferment the juice. More information here.


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The article linked here suggests getting very young walnuts before you have to shell them; and instead quartering the young walnuts. They also suggest here leaving it 40 days, 52 days or 3 months; so, leaving at least 40 days seems to be a cunning plan. http://www.williamrubel.com/delicous-vin-de-noix/ I hope this helps.


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This article may hold the answers you seek: https://winemakermag.com/1254-soapy-wines-vintage-dates-wine-wizard "...I suspect you’ve got a fatty acid issue caused by your stuck/sluggish fermentation. S. cerevisiae can emit fatty acids when under fermentative stress..." Stuck fermentations can be caused by a lack of dissolved oxygen in the first few days of ...


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tl;dr - Yes. It is definitely possible for wine bottles to break or explode, but I've seen many more stories of homebrewers having the corks pop out. I have, however, personally witnessed a commercial "organic," "no sulfites added" wine blow out the bottom of its bottle sitting on the shelf in a grocery store. Most likely, this depends on how secure the ...


2

When I think of "raking to a secondary" I can think of two reasons you would want to do this. #1-Clarity; racking gives the beverage more time for sediment to settle out. #2-Aging; depending on the beverage racking give it more time to age.


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Simply exposing a wine that was inoculated with wine yeast to oxygen doesn't create acetic acid. You need to inoculate with some acetic acid bacteria as well. Acetic acid bacteria can ferment both sugars and ethanol to make acetic acid. I have made red wine before, and I have pulled a gallon of partially fermented wine, inoculated with acetobacter and ...


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In the past I've only gotten bombs when I had put too much sugar into the bottle when conditioning, and it has always happened within a week or 2. I think also with wine bottles being a thick as they are they are a bit tougher. If you haven't added extra sugar for bottle carbonation then there must've been some residual left in there when you bottled the ...


1

Campden tablets are usually Potassium Metabisulfite .It works by depriving organisms of oxygen, kinda like how halon puts a fire out. For yeast it means it doesn't have what it needs so it's waiting, doesn't kill it. I've made cider from juice that used Potassium Metabisulfide as a preservative, fermination would only start once the preservative was ...


1

The temperature could be a factor, make sure your bottles are stored at a correct temperature (see the yeast package for ideal temperature). It is possible that the SO2 did not evaporate as much as expected? There are kits that you can buy to measure sulfites in wine : Titrets It is also possible that the yeast in the bottles did not get enough oxygen to ...


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A recipe for damson (sweet) wine from C.J.J. Berry - First Steps in Winemaking, I have not made this wine, but the ones I have made were excellent. 1.75Kg Damsons; 0.25kg barley (crushed); 1.75Kg Sugar; 4.5l Water; Pectic Enzyme; Yeast and Yeast Nutrient. Stone and cut up fruit, place damsons and barley in a pan and pour over boiling water, cover and ...


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Things to buy, obtainable from your local homebrew shop for pretty cheap: Wine yeast Sanitizing agent (I use Potassium metabisulfites) A tube for siphoning About actually making the wine, the process is the following: Sanitize everything that touches the soon-to-be wine Wash the berries. If you want to be extra cautious, you can boil them in just ...


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I would: first freeze the gooseberries to break the cell walls. Then I would quickly boil them up with some sugar to steralise them. Then I would let it cool in a covered pan. once cool, place into demijon then add paectin and yeast to the mixture. Wait 2 weeks rack into a secondary wait one week and then bottle. I'd also get a copy of this book: ...


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My initial thought was that you should get a smaller vessel, but thinking it through likely the CO2 would drive out any excess oxygen or the yeast would consume it. I think you should be OK. I would personally get a second smaller fermenter as it allows you to make a small and a large batch in parallel, which isn't a bad thing :-)


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Try siphoning off a glass of the wine and adding a pinch of BiCarbonate of Soda or Calcium Carbonate, give it a good stir and see how it turns out.


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My experience with mead is that you should wait. What I do personnally is I bottle (I use twist-cap bottles which are not really air-tight), wait a few months and then siphon again to clean bottles, leaving just a bit more dead yeast at the bottom. My mead usually becomes really clear after about 8 months, and stops tasting yeasty at the same time. It's ...


1

It could be that some fermentation is still going on, and the sediment is yeast that, over time, has grown and multiplicated. If that's the case, you should open your bottles before they become timed bombs, which will explode in your cellar. Check if your wine is sparkling (even just a little bit), that gives an indication that fermentation is still occuring ...


1

There are several issues with attempting to ferment with wild yeast. I've not tried it but here are a few things I've heard from people who have. If you get good results, it is unlikely that you can repeat the process. Know what you are getting is a nice feature of prepackaged yeast. The wild yeast may not be alcohol tolerant. i.e. They may die off when ...


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I have always used black tea stewed for about 30-45 min, and used as my about half of my brewing water, if you want to try with raisins have a look here: http://www.westchesterwinemakers.com/2013/05/31/x-18/


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As it is the stage which contains the majority of the activity (the first 3-4 days 90% of fermentable sugars are consumed), it is also the stage when the majority of waste products are produced by the yeast. The temperature control over this period plus the variety of yeast used will have the largest affect on the flavour profile of the beverage. Obviously ...


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My initial guess was the Campden tablet's SO2 was the culprit and hunting around for similar stories I found this on a home brew forum: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=267418 Observations in this thread would seem to fit with what you have experienced.


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You're going to have some type of alcoholic drink, but you picked a few components that can add to the challenge of a first time vitner. Cranberry is a tough juice, as stated, high in acid, can make a good wine, but will need time and possible other additives to balance the final result into something palatable. Bread yeast will give, a "doughy" flavor, you ...


1

Grape skins have wild yeast on them that will, in time, ferment the grape juice. Depending on the particular blend of yeast on your grapes, you may get complete fermentation, or the yeast may have low alcohol tolerance and the fermentation will halt before all the sugars have been consumed. Yeast contribute to the flavour profile of the wine, and ...



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