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7

You will have a much better chance of success if you ferment the beer first with a neutral ale yeast, and then pitch "bugs" (brett, pedio, whatever you like) into it. Simply open fermenting and seeing what happens is seldom successful.


7

It's a bit involved, but I've done it with good results. The hardest thing to do is to separate the yeast from any other wild molds. What you need. Wild fruit. I have a peach tree and plum tree so it worked out well for me. 2lbs. DME Gelatin 3 Petri Dishes Hops Conical flask w/ airlock Take 1 lb. of the DME and dissolve into warm water. You're shooting ...


4

The most obvious place to gather wild yeasts consistently to me is on the surface of fresh picked fruit. Get a few non-waxed apples (i.e. not the ones in the typical grocery store), mash 'em up, add some water and you'll get a yeast feast going. That is basically what wild-fermented cider is and I've got a batch of fresh-pressed cider that I'm letting ...


4

I think relying on the supposed wild bugs in the wood naturally is generally a bad way to go. You've already done it "right" by pitching an appropriate brewing Brett strain you got from wyeast. So go ahead and steam your oak cubes first. You want to give the bugs you put in there on purpose the best chance at being the predominant character in the final ...


3

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state ...


3

There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


3

What is your vessel? The bugs in Roeselare need more oxygen than yeast does. I've heard that using a plastic bucket, which lets in quite a bit of oxygen, can drop the pellicle in as little as 6 months. I've also seen people use the wooden-stick-in-a-carboy method that have dropped between 1 and 2 years. Like @Fishtoaster said, some people wait until the ...


3

I've been looking around and I can't find an account of someone who had their pellicle ever drop, including one guy going on 2 years. The accepted practice seems to be to rack it from underneath the pellicle when it's ready.


2

I imagine that you could put a portion of the wort (a gallon or so) into another vessel with a wider open surface overnight (maybe a big kitchen pot or something), and then pour that into the main portion of the wort once it has gathered up some bugs. Are you inocculating at all, or just trying to see if your "house bugs" are any good?


2

There is no need for oxygen concerns if the beers are in sealed containers with airlocks. The fermentation pushed out the Oxygen a long time ago and any residual CO2 in the beer will likely push out any more O2 if that wasn't the case.


2

Ok, so I went and tried it. Maybe I didn't let the soursop get ripe enough or it didn't get the yeasts, or whatever but after a week and a half in the fridge and no evidence of fermentation I gave up on the wild aspect and cultured it with a few tablespoons of the local fermented rice dish, tape hitam (basically red yeast rice mash). This started the ...


2

First thing is to store it in a cool place to slow down the fermentation while you make your plan of attack. If there is a specific yeast profile you are looking for, then it's probably best to knock out the existing yeast now - depending upon the OG, current SG of 1.045 could well be less than half way through the fermentation, so you still have plenty to ...


2

Keep in mind that the agitation of moving them will release CO2 that's in solution in the beer now. I wouldn't worry at all about moving them.


1

Given that you've opened the vessels, there is almost certainly going to be oxygen in there. I would move after re-starting fermentation so that can help absorb any oxygen or displace through active CO2 production. That way you can be sure any motion doesn't negatively affect the beer. Even if you hadn't opened the ferementors, I'd still be careful. ...


1

As Tobias notes, you likely have a mix of yeast and bacteria. You might have primarily had yeast from the grapes but as you have advanced your starter using flour, you likely picked up lactobacteria. Sourdough starter, which is basically what it sounds like you made, is a mix of bacteria and yeast. The wikipedia page has a touch of info on sourdough ...


1

Take some and add sugar (half starter, half priming), Let it sit with a balloon or something on it to tell if positive pressure is created. This will tell you if you still have some viable yeast to condition with or if you need to pitch new yeast. If you do have to re-pitch I would probably pitch something VERY neutral and probably wouldn't do a starter, ...


1

I made a Lambic once from a recipe that called for the yeast out of a bottle of Chimay. I saved the last couple of inches of beer in the bottle and built the yeast up to pitching volume through a series of increasingly larger starters over the course of about a week. It worked pretty good, and the beer turned out great!


1

What I've found so far is certainly not conclusive, but it appears that lambics (probably the most common spontaneously fermented beer) are innoculated in vats with a very large surface area of the wort exposed to air. It's conjecture, but to me this implies that having a very large unrestricted exposure to fresh air (which is at least mildly circulated) is ...


1

Yes, I have done this. In fact, I'm doing it right now. I took some wine grapes (pinot, from my winery) and crushed them into juice and skins. DON'T rinse them first. The first time I just left them in a mixing bowl, loosely covered with an unsealed plastic lid, until they fermented spontaneously on the native yeast. From there, I made a sourdough ...


1

I think its largely trial and error of leaving an open fermentor around for a day, then close it up and seeing what you get. Not sure if the "coolness" factor of saying you did it would outweigh the cost of burning through enough worts to get one batch right.... then you'd probably spend just as much time trying to repeat it.



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