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8

Torrified Wheat has been heat treated (kind of "popped")to break the cellular structure, allowing for rapid hydration and allows malt enzymes to more completely attack the starches and protein. Torrified Wheat can be used in place of raw wheat in Belgian style Wit-Beers, also very good for adding body and head, especially to English ales. Since it has not ...


7

Unmalted Wheat is traditionally used in Belgian Wit beers. I have not experimented with this myself, but in this podcast about brewing wits, the brewer says that unmalted wheat provides a stronger flavor than malted. Crushing and boiling separately is a cereal mash. You have to gelatinize the starches in the wheat so that sugar can be broken out during the ...


5

A similar question was asked here on the BN forum. It all boils down (no pun intended) to whether the wheat malt will have enough diastatic power to convert itself. The answer to that is a little confusing to me so far. The charts at the Home Brewing Wiki here give diastatic power as percentages, but other references I've found use Lintner or ...


5

Assuming we're dealing with just basic malted wheat, and plain ol' 2-row malted barley... Your malted barley has a clean smooth lightly malted flavor. It has enough diastic power to convert itself and other adjuncts, up to 10% of it's own weight. It is relatively low in protein, and easy to mash with a single infusion. Barley can be used for 100% of a mash. ...


5

I would not use finings, I like the cloudiness and believe it to be part of the style, I would not use anything to interfere with this.


4

Maybe add a bit of Limoncello, some other lemon liqueur, or lemon extract. Another option would be to bottle about 60% beer and 40% lemon-lime soda. This is how authentic Austrian Radlers are made (although a lot of people seem to think they're made of lemonade), which I think are considered a type of shandy. This weakens the strength of your beer, but ...


4

What yeast did you use? Most Hefeweizen yeasts are known for strong sulfur production, and as you noticed, it usually drops out. My rule of thumb is to wait for the sulfur to completely dissipate before I bottle or keg the beer. I get sulfur from WLP 300 & 380, but I had a sulfur BOMB on a batch with 351, I even posted a question here about it: Strong ...


4

It looks like normal Wit yeast byproducts to me. Wit yeast is a weird one anyway, imho. Does it smell like vinegar at all? A Wit should taste a little tangy, but you just need to verify that it's not infected. I'd recommend bottling now, but start checking the bottles for over-carbonation starting in about a week, and if you start getting gushers, then you ...


4

Flaked wheat is raw wheat - it's not been malted. This means that the enzymes that would normally help convert the starches to sugars have not even been created yet, since this is one affect of malting. "Normal" wheat is also called "red" wheat, due to the slight reddish hue it has. The grain is malted, and so has the ability to convert it's own starches ...


3

By watery, I assume you mean the body is lacking. You can typically tell how much body you're going to have by the final gravity reading. You're on the lower end of 1.012, which means it's ~12 gravity points above what plain water would be, so technically it isn't a whole lot but it is definitely noticeable (and frankly, about standard for a wheat beer). ...


3

1) It would be beer. Beer is an alcoholic beverage made from grain, it doesn't have to be made from barley. 2) The most important thing to remember about wheat is that it has no husk. No husk = no filter bed for your grain when you lauter. No filter = stuck mash. It is possible to lauter an all-wheat mash, but it takes a very long time and is tricky. This ...


3

Adding finings is a waste of effort with this style when brewed correctly. It is possible to have too much residual haze stuff in the beer and it will be super cloudy, and maybe even chunky. If your normal pale ales are cloudy, maybe finings are a good idea with this wiesse attempt. That said, some people actually add a little flour to the boil late to ...


2

Just Do It Add lemonade to your bottling bucket after you bottled the normal portion of wheat beer. Remember that most lemonades will contribute sugars that the yeast will eat. Try to figure out the content you are adding and subtract it from the priming sugar. Watch out for bottle bombs. Measure It It is easy to figure out the volume of lemonade to add ...


2

A brewer friend of mine does this regularly. I quizzed him about it and he advises pulling 2-3 quarts out of your original 5 gallon batch, into a sanitized jar that sits in the fridge while fermentation takes place. You can do this right out of the boil kettle, and into a pre-heated glass jar. Top it, let it cool on the counter, and put it in the fridge ...


2

Try this link to Kai Troester's wikisite: Sugar for Carbonation I can't just post an answer because its dependent upon the temperature of the fermented beer (residual CO2) and the gravity of the speise. I also don't know to what volume of CO2 you want to make the resultant beer.


2

Its impossible to tell what it is per se from a photo unless someone has had the same thing happen to them, even then... But I had something similar to this and I think it was lipids (fats) on the surface. The only place that would have come from in any great quantity would be the yeast. Five weeks in primary may be the culprit if it wasn't under great ...


2

Torrefied wheat can sometimes be drier, and create a good head without haziness in the beer. But if you are only using a few hundred grams / 4-8oz and not brewed the recipe before then relax, your beer will still be fine. If you have brewed it before, you might find the beer doesn't taste as crisp/dry as before.


1

The flavor will be very slightly different. Probably not enough to notice unless you did a side by side with the same beer made with torrified.


1

For a very precise answer, there is actually a paper published in the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers journal ('Water Absorbtion Characteristics of Wheat and Barley During Soaking' Transactions of the ASABE. Vol. 46(2): 361–366 . (doi: 10.13031/2013.12916) @2003) The abstract reads: Water absorption characteristics of wheat and ...


1

White wheat and flaked wheat are both adjuncts and should be used in conjunction with a base malt (like wheat malt). From John Palmer's book on the former two adjuncts: Unmalted wheat is a common ingredient in wheat beers, including: American Wheat, Bavarian Weisse, and is essential to Belgian Lambic and Wit. It adds starch haze and high levels of ...


1

It sounds like it will be watery, though carbonation will add some mouthfeel so it depends on what you mean by watery. Usually, prior to carbonation, the beer will taste sweeter and a bit thicker. This might be a bit much, but there's a lot of good information here and on the first two links from this page: ...


1

I had the same problem with 351. I stick with 380 now, the sulfur clears much quicker. For my hefe with 351, the flavor eventually went away, but it was in a secondary, not a keg. I think you should do what you're thinking: bring it to room temp and vent it regularly. Maybe give it a good swirl to get any yeast back into suspension.


1

Yes, you can brew a beer from 100% malted wheat. It will absolutely convert. The Weyermann pale malted wheat is 200+ °WK (Windisch-Kolbach units, which converts to ~ 62° Lintner). That said, Weyermann recommends... "Recommended Quantities: Up to 80% in Bavarian-style Weizenbiers, up to 50% in North American pub wheat ales, up to 7% in Altbier and Kölsch" ...


1

Irish moss is a protein coagulator, as a result it is not a primary determinant of yeast based haze. Yeast remaining in suspension is where a good hefe gets its haze from. Therefore, adding irish moss will not clear your hefe up much at all. If you do add irish moss it will simply help remove some of the cold break, which is the protein source where irish ...


1

Skip the moss in my opinion. this style is intended to be hazy and you wouldn't want to over-clear it. Clarity is also somewhat overrated in my opinion so take it with a grain of salt. All of the Hefe's I've done have not used moss and have come out looking excellent (just enough haze in the glass to look proper).


1

Unmalted wheat provides a more "tart" wheat flavor to me, as compared to normal wheat malt. It also adds to foam retention and makes a very thick, creamy head on the beer. It will also make the beer quite cloudy if used in large percentages (more than, say, 15%). Check out Hoegarden Wit, it has a nice luscious head and a creaminess that you can expect from ...



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