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7

74-78F is on the warm side, so you'll want to reduce time spent at that temperature to a minimum to reduce the chance of staling reactions from affecting the beer. On the plus side, the high temperature means the yeast won't need more than 3 days to ferment the priming sugars and clean up, after which you can then chill the bottles for a few days to allow ...


6

No offense, but try making the wheat beer without the peaches first. If this is your second batch there is a pretty high probability there are parts of your brewing process that can be optimized. Tossing peaches in there may just hide or create new problems so you won't really be able to tell whats wrong and how to fix it. Otherwise, I wouldn't worry ...


5

Depending on the temperature at which you're storing it, it should be fully carbonated in 0 to 10 days. The best way to determine this is to open one up and try it and see if it's carbonated yet. If it's not yet, then give it a couple more days. Most wheat beers are not really meant for aging, so it should be pleasant/drinkable as soon as it is ...


4

At first when I looked at it, I thought the bright white stuff you mentioned was actually glare from the lights with the distortion of the carboy, and that you were talking about the raspberries, which have since lost most of their color and look more like brains, if anything. Now that I know what you're talking about, that is definitely mold/bacteria, with ...


3

You can do a mash rest at 110F-ish to develop some of the precursors that the yeast use for clove character. This develops ferulic acid in the mash which get converted to 4-vinyl guaiacol. Thirty minutes is fine, then infuse up to your sac rest temp. But its easier to just ferment warmer say 72F, that will develop more clove vs. banana esters. I ferment my ...


3

You can certainly try it. That's the major advantage of homebrewing. However, just because these beers are coming prepackaged nowadays doesn't mean that's the way its done in the place of origin. These things evolved really as beer cocktails. I think its far better to just add the lemonade to the beer in the glass. That way you have great beer to begin ...


2

Time and cold temps are the best way. Keep it around 35F for a couple weeks and it will clear.


1

One difficulty you'll have with getting that signature shandy flavor when adding fruit to secondary is that the sweetness (sugar) of the juice will get converted to alcohol by the yeast, leaving you with mostly aroma, and a little flavor. A lot of people don't recognize how much sugar plays into the overall taste of the fruit. Without the sugars, it is not ...


1

It's definitely contamination, but I doubt it's made contact with the beer, since most contaminats at this stage feed on oxygen and perish in alcohol, plus it's just a little on top of the fruit. Since the beer smells and tastes fine now then rack from beneath, chill and force carbonate (if you have kegs), or prime as usual if you bottle-carbonate, then ...


1

I do want to suggest that if you do like it, you could simply grate some lemon rind - a little bit - into a few bottles to experiement with how you like it. I like this flavor but it is preferential and personal. Label those bottles with how much you put to find out. I would say that if you think it would work try a little in the bottle after the brewing ...



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