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Concur with Molot. I'd add that boiling water off can concentrate bad compounds like heavy metals, so if you really are that worried about your water maybe get it tested for safety.


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As always, it depends. Boiling uncovered makes mineral content higher, but lets volatile components to evaporate. Boiling covered - opposite. We don't know what's in your water, so we can't reliably tell which is better. Ideally, mineral content is low, and your water supply uses ozone instead of chlorine-based substances to prevent bacteria growth - then, ...


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Rain water can be very close to RO or distilled. Rain is usually triggered by a solid particle (dust) and or atmospheric compression. Then as it falls it's collecting other particles from the air. Then again picking up particles from the collector. I would have it tested not only for safety to identify potential contamniates but also to establish your ...


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You probably want to get the water tested to ensure it is fit for human consumption. The rain itself should be fine, but the roof surface and storage vessels may not made of food grade/food safe materials. Here is a list of water testing labs from the NZ MoH: http://www.drinkingwater.esr.cri.nz/mohlabs/labsfornzregionalpha.asp?NZRegion=NZNZ01 For Auckland ...


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If the air is really clean, you have this part covered. But is it? It is not only about how clean it is where you live - that is, in your area, near ground level. Is it clean up to 2000 feet? Was it clean where water evaporated? What was in the air on the way? Start from reading about acid rains. And there is much more about this topic. Too much to put here. ...


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Despite the fancy scientific answers, the correct answer is you brew a few times and measure how much you start and end with.


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What you are actually looking for here is not the amount of evaporation you will be working with it is the amount of vaporization. This is a technical but important distinction the overwhelming amount of water loss is from the boil not from evaporation. Now this can be calculated but unfortunately I won’t be able to give you a magic bullet for this there are ...


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I've not seen a calculator that's reliable. Could be calculated but too many variables: surface area, altitude, actual wort temperature etc. It's much easier to just do a boil test to establish your brewhouse boil off rate. For example my brewhouse boil off rate with a keggle is 1 gallon an hour at modest rolling boil. So for 90 min boil, 12 gallon batch I ...



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