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If the vast majority of your fermentables are coming from extract, pH isn't something you need to worry about. pH and heat are extremely important factors for mashing, but if you're using extract and specialty grains, you're not really mashing in the same sense. When you actually do start AG brewing you'll find that the grain addition tends to drop the pH to ...


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I would leave this alone (mostly). There are no red-flags in the water report. Bicarbonate and alkalinity are moderately well suited for a stout. If you want to tip the sulfate / chloride ratio toward malty you only need 1.5 to 2 grams of CaCl to do it. (Do you have a scale sensitive enough?) Put this in at the beginning of the boil.


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Firstly I am assuming that the figures you give are metric (which they probably aren't) ie mg per litre and so you will have to convert if not. secondly the target water profile is just a suggestion, the formulae allow you to get to any profile you decide to use. General target water profile for stout: Ca100 bicarbonate 100-200 cl 300 so4 100. therefore. ...


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Why do you want to balance the Bicarbonate? Most things I've read say that a very alkaline water is great for darker beers. Here's one source (of many): http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15-2.html


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Your pH was right on. The optimal range for alpha- and beta-amylase is 5.1 to 5.5. See the "mash target" bubble in this image from How To Brew.


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This is an interesting question, however I suspect there is no good answer because of the number of variables involved you would have to factor in reactions, precipitation, flocculation as well as additions of new ions from the grains and hops. Its also quite difficult to determine the exact concentration of various ions in your water supply. So why not ...


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Using an Immersion Whirlpool Chiller, so a pump to recirculate the wort, and accelerate the thermal exchange. Consider a tap water between 24C to 28C (75 to 83F), and an environment temperature of about 26C to 30C (80 to 86F). To chill about 20L (5 galons), I use only the tap water until I reach about 45C (113F) collecting all the hot water that exists from ...


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You are targeting 200 ppm for your final 6 gallons of wort, but you need that same amount of mineral present in 7.5 gallons of wort, pre-boil. Not the same concentration (200 ppm), mind you, but the same absolute amount, since it will concentrate as evaporation occurs. To calculate ppm in 7.5 gal: 200 ppm x 6 gallons / 7.5 gallons = 160 ppm To get 160ppm ...


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Your equation should only be adjusted for water loss due to boiling: for the above target use 1.088g per gallon assuming 7.5g of wort will boil down to 6g. Losses in the mash are simply due to water sticking to the grains, the is no appreciable 'sticking' of salts to the grain, other than surface tension of water. Furthermore even if your sparge water ...



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