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7

Let it sit for another week in a cooler place than your original primary. A fridge is nice, but not everyone has that kind of space. Even with the cold conditioning to help clarification, you do need a racking cane set up. I've never had much luck using the post at the base of a bucket from a primary ferment. My trub is always up to the level of the port ...


6

You are absolutely correct. Unless something is dissolved into the liquid, or there's so much trub that the hydrometer is sitting on top of it, the reading will be unaffected.


5

Great question on a topic that I don't think is discussed much by homebrewers since we tend to stick to ales. This is a more significant issue for creating clean lagers..or at least a more obvious problem in lagers when present. Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager Beers is about the only place I've found a solid discussion of the topic. On pp 170-171: ...


4

The trub will settle naturally as the beer finished fermentation. Don't worry about it. Especially don't try to "fix" it now. That often results in more problems than you originally had. There has been at least one test I know of using wort with trub vs. wort with trub removed. The beer was a pilsner and the conclusion was that the beer with the trub ...


4

Removing hot break is beneficial to your finished beer. Many of the compounds taste bad and can stay in suspension through fermentation to packaging. Totally removing hot & cold break, such as with a pre-fermenter filter, can damage head retention. You need some of those proteins. Brewing Techniques has a good article on the subject. There are a few ...


4

I believe Little Creatures filter and re-inoculate with a lager strain - keeping the total yeast count very low will help in minimising the sediment. I'm not sure how easy it would be to do at home - assuming you can filter, you'd need to accurately measure an exact quantity of very healthy yeast. You'd probably need to use trial and error and be prepared ...


3

If the trub is actually physically holding the hydrometer up, preventing it from moving down, then unambiguously: yes, the trub will render your hydrometer reading useless. If, on the other hand, the trub is suspended in the liquid, it is a mixed bag. Suspended solids will impact a hydrometer reading, but for brewers it is usually very minimal. The only ...


3

Yes, apparently you can. There's a recipe for it here: http://marmitelover.blogspot.no/2011/04/how-to-make-your-own-marmite.html The author says she uses 'top fermentation from a brewery' - which I imagine is the krausen, although on a homebrew scale I wonder if that gives enough yeast. She also mentions that it doesn't taste like the original - lacking ...


3

I don't see any way to bottle condition without having some sediment in the bottle. The sediment is the flocculated yeast that consumed the priming sugar to create the carbonation. Without viable yeast in the bottle there is no way to produce the carbonation. The definition of bottle conditioning used by your favorite brewery may be slightly different ...


3

I have never found moving a secondary around to disturb the stuff at the bottom of the carboy too much. Most of the fluid movement is at the surface and it takes a lot of sloshing to translate that through the entire fluid. Whenever possible, I have moved the carboy the night before so it would settle out by morning. Or I'd move it in the morning and do ...


2

I do 2 gallon batches on occasion. The brew-in-a-bag method is great for this, but you get a lot of trub. In this 1-gallon jug the dark band under the krausen ring is beer, the rest is suspended stuff. After a few weeks it all settled and I got six bottles of nice looking (and tasting) beer.


2

In theory, baring any outside influence in a completely 100% sterile environment, a yeast strain would be good to use over and over again. The issue arises with sterility and outside contamination. I personally don't feel that there is an exact number as to how many times it can be done simply due to the fact that every situation is different and every time ...


2

You won't trap any yeast in the turbo at a rate that's noticeable. The yeast are too small for that. I would however worry about oxygenating the beer if fermentation is already done in primary. A better practice would be to just let it ferment out and then put the whole fermentor in a cold fridge or a water bath with bottles of ice water for a couple days. ...


2

Someone told me about these sediment catchers. http://sedexbrewing.com I've not used them before, but it seems like the basic idea is that you bottle-condition with the bottles upside-down. The sediment ends up in the bottom part of the two-piece cap. When you remove the bottom part, it seals the top part so your beer remains carbonated, but you've removed ...


2

"The best way to obtain yeast is to skim it from the krausen of a currently fermenting beer." -John Palmer, How to Brew It may be tough in the jugs your are using but taking some of the krausen is the best way to get the yeast. Source http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-8.html


1

This is an odd one for sure. Maybe an extended recirc would have been called for. I have been in this situation before too, but never had an excess of trub. I don't have THE answer you are looking for, so I'll pose an answer to get the answer. There are many pro-scale brewers that mash and lauter in separate vessels. They tend to mash with a thin mash ...


1

Large amounts of suspended particles will effect SG readings, but it is hard to say by how much. In the future, take a sample, clarify it with some gelatin, then take the reading. The more accurate readings come from the most clarified solutions. Chances are that you are correct in assuming that the OG is off. Using a refractometer to determine the ABV on ...


1

Theoretically trub can take some of the hoppiness out of your beers by trapping some of the oils from the hops (more of an issue with dry hopping) and then floculating to the bottom. Other than that, Trub should only be a noticeable issue if you are planning on letting the beer sit on it for an extended period of time (many weeks). The other concern would ...


1

There are some brewers in the UK who tank condition their beer. Once they have the correct level of carbonation, they put it through a centrifuge to remove the yeast, but retain the carbonation and put in a bottle. If you level the bottle for long enough it will throw a sediment as there is still some very, very small yeast particles in suspension, as the ...


1

Yes, bottling without a lot of sediment is possible. The commercial breweries filter and then repitch a known amount of yeast. While this does leave sediment on the bottom it is usually a very small amount - a light dusting. To do this on the homebrew scale without filtering you would cold-condition your beer for a few weeks after fermentation is ...


1

If you consider bottle conditioning to be using yeast to generate the co2 to carbonate the beer instead of force carbonating with an external co2 source, then you could keg condition your homebrew and transfer that to bottles once it's carbonated.


1

I boil in the kitchen, ferment in the basement, and had originally thought about a setup like you describe, filling my primaries on a waist-high rack (Metro shelving) to make the racking process easier on my back and better for the beer. I would still be considering this if I wasn't considering a chest freezer for temperature control, which pretty much ...



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