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11

You will have bottle bombs. Luckily for you it's not too late, but you're in for some careful work. Sanitize a fermenter and airlock. Fill a bucket or tub with sanitizer. Put the bottles in the bucket to sanitize the outside. Sanitize your bottle opener. Uncap them and carefully pour their contents into the fermenter. Do not splash. Sanitize your bottle ...


9

The best is when so much pressure builds up that the airlock is shot to the ceiling and your closet is splattered in fermentation goo. Solutions: use a 6.5 gallon carboy for 5 gallon batches -and/or- use a blow-off tube (examples here)


9

First, go to your living room. Trust me.... Flip over your easy chair and shake it all around. Trust me... Flip over your couch. Don't eat the crusty old cheetos that fall out. Trust me, I am not insane. Gather up the loose change. Unlatch the lid, the keg pressure will keep the lid closed. The wedge a penny under each foot of the lid latch, between ...


9

Despite your instructions moving the beer while it was at 1.020 was probably the problem. The yeast had stalled out for some reason. Perhaps under pitching or non healthy yeast to start with. Or the temp could have dropped too much and the yeast started to go dormant. Its always easier to fix stalled ferments when you are still on the primary yeast cake. ...


7

PBW. It is magic. Seriously. Put a bit in there with warm water, and the krausen should go away in 30 minutes. I once put a touch in my coffee mug, and the stains from months of not washing it diligently were erased. It's magic.


7

This answers your question. Your beer is young and very green. It needs time to age. Don't despair. Give it time, both to carbonate in the bottle and age a bit after that. Many home brewers are too quick to judge in the primary, secondary, or bottle bucket. Excellent beer takes time. I've had beers that are TERRIBLE in the bottle bucket and AWESOME ...


6

A number that big strictly sounds like mixing errors to me. Stratification of warm wort and cold top off water happens a lot. You need to shake vigorously anyway to get some aeration into the fermentor. Take your gravity readings after that step in the future. Also, if you used 2.5 gallon of water for the boil and 3 gallons to top off, what happened to ...


6

It was definitely a good idea to move it. Leave it where it is. Personally, I would have moved it to someplace even cooler. I prefer to ferment generally ion the 62-65F range. The best thing to do is chill your wort to just below the temp you want to ferment. The heat of fermentation will bring it up into range. The temp you started at might have ...


6

A rich nutty flavor comes from a combination of a little roast/toasted malt and some biscuity strong malty notes. You get roasted/toasted from things like toasted malt, pale chocolate or chocolate malt (used in moderation). You can get the malt/biscuit thing from munich malts, and biscuit/victory malt. (Granted biscuit and munich don't taste the same, but I ...


6

Yes, it can be fixed and the plan sounds fine. Make a log of this, and review when brewing in future so you can fix the process and avoid these problems in future brews. K├Âlsch is lightly hopped so don't worry about adding additional hops. Your lower gravity will have increased utilization slightly so adding non-hopped wort will go some way to balance this ...


5

Go Ahead I often shake up my fermentors to keep the fermenters going. (Just learned that -or is the vessel and -er is the organism.) My technique is to swirl the whole carboy to get the yeast back in suspension. It's best done on the tail end of fermentation and I routinely shake my high-gravity beers to keep them going. Pros Much reduced risk of ...


5

The general rule is as long as a beer doesn't smell or taste off, it's probably okay to drink. It sounds to me like you have a Lactobacillus infection. Lacto will give the beer a sour taste and that taste will increase over time. That's the white film and flecks. It matches every description I've heard of for a lacto infection. Hopefully others will ...


4

Yeast will fail to flocculate for a variety of reasons. In your case I think the biggest factor is the yeast are still active. As long as yeast are still actively eating sugars and haven't fallen into survival mode, they'll stay in solution where the food is. Once they die they should flocculate.( here is the yeast life cycle in beer ) I would wait ...


4

Check the yeast maker's web site for preferred temperatures. Yeast can work in a range, many down to 60°F. Pick a yeast that can handle the temps, hybrids like California ale. If fermentation is truly stopped, not just slow, you need to wake the yeast up again. When temperatures return to the preferred range shake the carboy up to rouse the yeast and ...


4

The best advice I can give is to still wait it out. 6 days isn't all that long for a brew where you only pitched a Wyeast pack and not a larger starter of yeast. I ferment normally for 14 days. If you can raise the temp to 70-72ish that will ensure the yeast wake up and push to completion if possible. Normally fermenting at 68F is a great idea, but if your ...


4

I haven't bottled for a while now, so this is just some thoughts. Others, I am sure, will have helpful advice. My first thought is that you are under-priming. Make sure you are adding the right amount of priming sugar. Too much and you risk a blow-out, too little and low carbonation. I can't recall the best quantity at the moment but if you can add it to ...


4

The second round of yeast will just add a yeasty flavor to the beer if it doesn't flocculate out much. But the change in flavor will be negligible. Depending on the temperature you were fermenting at all the fermentation could have happened when you weren't paying attention. If the beer was warm going from 1035 to 1010 overnight is very likely. FWIW, I'd ...


4

One option is to get an appropriately sized funnel with a removable screen. I just bought one of these recently (the funnel cone is huge) and used it for the first time last night. The only downside is that I had to stop a couple times to unclog the screen, and of course I realized after doing so that my fingers hadn't been sterilized (should have had a ...


4

Sounds like everything is proceeding on schedule. Congratulations -- you've made beer! Don't worry about the rate of bubbling. If it was fermenting vigourously in the first few days, you've got nothing to be concerned about. I wouldn't touch it right now. In fact, I wouldn't even rack it to secondary. Let it sit another couple of weeks, and then check the ...


3

Its one of the following: Incomplete fermentation leaving residual sugar in the bottle. Too much priming sugar. Which would also be amplified as a problem if #1 is the case. You inadvertently picked up an infection and the non-fermentables along with the priming sugar has led to over carbing. Your opening the bottles warm and the CO2 is no longer ...


3

Munton's beer kits always make light beers. They're not bad, but you have to add some more extracts on your own in order to have a good result. You can see that clearly by comparing the munton kits with the brewferm kits: while they use about the same amount of malt extract, munton's suggests you use it for about double the wort quantity brewferm does. ...


3

I have no experience with Munton's extracts. However, after a little research, I see two potential problems. Not enough fermentables Since you didn't have a hydrometer to measure the OG with I have to speculate. The can of extract weighs 1.8 kg which, if it is a typical liquid malt extract, should yield 5 gallons of 1.029 wort (reference). You mentioned ...


3

There sounds like a lot of variables here, any one of which could have resulted in characteristics you describe. Here are a few tips for your next batch. Don't give up, you will be surprised how much better your next batch is. Pay close attention to the liquid volumes. Pre-mark the inside of the bucket with a sharpie. If you followed the instructions and ...


3

Optimal temperature ranges vary slightly yeast to yeast. So a check with the yeast supplier will help with that data. But for most Ale yeast getting below 60F is probably too low. Maybe you still get fermentation, but the lower the temp gets for most ale yeast the cleaner it ferments. So if your making something with an english ale yeast, you might miss ...


3

I would personally leave is at the lower temperature which is probably where it should have been all along. If the yeast is still active at the lower temperature you shouldn't get any more off flavors from the temperature change. Although the damage may have already been done at the 75+ fermentation temps. You will get lots of phenol production like ...


3

I think you will be fine. According to white labs: White Labs Pitchable yeast is packaged with 70 to 140 billion yeast cells, which corresponds approximately to a 1-2 liter size starter. Lag times are typically between 12-24 hours for a normal strength brew. For a 5 gallon brew with ale yeast 150 to 250 billion cells is normal, with up to 400 billion ...


2

I would suspect also that the little bit of fat from the cocoa powder may be coating some of the yeast and making them more bouyant. Also creating aggregates that trap gas like White labs said. Anothe cause of poor flocculation is low calcium levels in your brewing water. Yeast need calcium as part of the flocculation process. You can't do anything about ...


2

I'm answering my own question on behalf of White Labs. I contacted them about this and here's what I got back: A lot of times with these flocculent strains, air pockets (or CO2 pockets) will cause the yeast to rise to the top. It is strange for this strain not to flocculate very quickly, but it is possible for something like this to happen. ...


2

Could be a lot of factors at play here, but lacking a hygrometer to take an initial gravity reading is likely a big factor here. What was your final gravity? Adding water is a non-issue from this condensed-wort brewer. I just recently picked up a 7.5 gallon brew kettle, and for the past 5 or so years have been using a 2-3 gallon boil with top-off to 5 ...



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