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6

I would get the wort into the fermenter with the yeast and then carefully transport it. Then you don't have to worry about the wort getting contaminated as much due to the airlock on the fermenter. The head space should be able to handle the sloshing from moving it (I am assuming that this is in a car). I would just make sure that it isn't going to go ...


4

Go ahead and move it. You won't oxidize the beer - the headspace is already filled with co2, and the yeast will scavenge any oxygen that does make it into the beer.


4

1.) no need to keep the tank hooked up. The keg will retain pressure 2.) No problem 3.) yep. Just make sure it's tightly sealed! 4.) if there's no sediment in the keg, an hour or 2 will be fine. Otherwise, maybe overnight


4

I would do nothing special. Just put the bottles back in the the same cases that the bottles came in. Beer you buy commercially is separated in 6 packs within the box by just a single layer of card-stock (the six pack carrier) and they do fine. These are driven all over the country and do fine. If you are doing the driving it would be fine too.


2

Put it in cases and wrap the cases in towels to help minimize the mess if you do have some break? I'd be more concerned about temperature problems, honestly.


2

I would suggest force carbing and bottling from a keg instead of bottle conditioning. A long trip may very well stir up any yeast on the bottom too. Also, since this is for a wedding, guests may not necessarily be familiar with bottle conditioned beers and might be put off by sediment regardless.


2

Keep in mind that the agitation of moving them will release CO2 that's in solution in the beer now. I wouldn't worry at all about moving them.


2

24 hours in, I don't think you have much to worry about. As mdma suggested, you still have active yeast that would gladly clean out any oxygen that finds its way into the beer. That said, I would either move the fermenter very soon or not at all. The vast majority of your fermentation is going to happen in the first 2-3 days. That period of most active ...


2

There is no need for oxygen concerns if the beers are in sealed containers with airlocks. The fermentation pushed out the Oxygen a long time ago and any residual CO2 in the beer will likely push out any more O2 if that wasn't the case.


1

It sounds like you're not getting a good seal on the caps. Do you notice carb loss over time? Do they leak when you simply tip them upside down? If so, it could be any number of things: the capper, your technique or the bottle itself (e.g. twist off rather than pry-off).


1

Were you using plastic pet bottles? If you use soda bottles some of them have a blue plastic seal under the cap which acts like a washer when you screw the cap down. If the cap is old the plastic seal may not be effective. Another option is that some plastic bottles do not use the blue plastic seal so you have to be careful as the what bottles go with ...


1

I found BCGA Guidance for drivers at work which, following the flow chart in Appendix 1 Part 2, shows that there are no specific requirements for non-toxic, non-flammable gases in cylinders less than 25Kg.


1

I'm not entirely sure on the UK regulations, but in general, I think those are intended for commercial transportation of compressed gases. I did find this which, bear in mind, is a few years old. I know that in the US people drive around with compressed air (SCUBA shops) and compressed oxygen (people on oxygen) without any warning signs on their cars, and ...


1

Given that you've opened the vessels, there is almost certainly going to be oxygen in there. I would move after re-starting fermentation so that can help absorb any oxygen or displace through active CO2 production. That way you can be sure any motion doesn't negatively affect the beer. Even if you hadn't opened the ferementors, I'd still be careful. ...


1

Make sure you aren't in violation of any bootlegging laws along the way. Each state will likely have different amounts considered allowed for personal use. Perhaps your state alcohol board will sell you tax seals/stamps (even though you only have small quantities), so if stopped you can point to them and avoid time spent talking with the local ...



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