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If you are slow to raise temp between steps, you are in effect spending more time in each enzyme's temp range. This could have an effect on the beer. For instance, if you do a rest at 120ish with a well modified malt (which you shouldn't do anyway!), spending longer in that low temp range can ruin the body and foam of the beer. If you're at a beta rest ...


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While these temperatures are great for brewing, it's the swing in temp that yeast don't like. Get as consistent as possible with refrigeration or otherwise first. That said, 2nd generation is actually much more tolerant to temperature swings than the 1st generation of yeast you get right out of the vial/bag. This will help you brew most types of beers ...


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For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


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1) Do I raise after 3 days or some other amount? (Rule of thumb here as I'm not going to take gravity readings) Assuming you aren't taking gravity readings, therefor you aren't examining the apparent attenuation, your best bet is to wait until after high-krausen. This really depends on the gravity of the beer, what yeast your using (ale vs. lager, fast ...


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The main point of raising the temp is simple. As the sugars become limiting the yeast begin to enter a dormancy phase. As yeast slow down the temp of your fermentation begins to lower too. That lowering temp is also a signal to yeast to go dormant. This causes a cyclical effect of potential having the yeast drop out sooner than you want and you do not ...


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It sounds like the kind of temperature change you're talking about shouldn't bother the yeast much unless it pushes them below or out of the proper range of fermentation temperatures for that specific yeast. Rapid changes can shock or hurt the yeast, for example if you dump a small, warm liquid yeast or yeast starter into a cold wort/must then the yeast ...


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Try increasing your room temp for a about a week and then fridge overnight. If that doesn't help then it's back to the drawing board I'm afraid.



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