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If fermentation has finished and you're certain of that, the beer will benefit from getting it as cold as possible rather than leaving it warm. Cold crashing, as it's called, will help drop the yeast and leave you with a clearer beer. In addition, it will provide you with a crisper, cleaner flavor.


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A little worried, perhaps, but regardless you should attempt to keep the yeast/beer itself in the yeast's ideal temperature range. If you have a temp controller, then look into getting some sort of "thermowell" to put the temp controller's sensor in the middle of the fermentor itself, but taping (and insulting) the probe against the side of the fermentor ...


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This article may hold the answers you seek: https://winemakermag.com/1254-soapy-wines-vintage-dates-wine-wizard "...I suspect you’ve got a fatty acid issue caused by your stuck/sluggish fermentation. S. cerevisiae can emit fatty acids when under fermentative stress..." Stuck fermentations can be caused by a lack of dissolved oxygen in the first few days of ...


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what kind of hops and how much? You may need to increase the IBUs. Also, what is the extract made from? Check to make sure it is a 2-Row and not something with more malt backbone (i.e. Pilsner) You also may want to find a higher attenuation yeast strain.


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The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


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What the calculators are trying to estimate is how much CO2 from fermentation is still dissolved in the beer. The yeast produce CO2 during fermentation, most of which escapes into the atmosphere, but some remains in solution in the beer. The amount that remains is influenced by temperature and pressure. Assuming the pressure is nominally atmospheric, we only ...


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Apparently these calculators are telling you how much sugar is currently in the beer, assuming the yeast have been working at the current temperature (and that the beer remains saturated with CO2). If cold beer is put in a room temperature bottle, it will warm and lose some CO2 in a few seconds. So I'd say calculate based on temperature when the cap is put ...



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