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5

There are kits with call themselves "lager" kits, but if you make them with the yeast provided and at the temperatures suggested, they will not produce a true lager beer. The beer they produce might taste quite similar to a light lager, but they will be ales. They would probably fit into one of these (2015) BJCP categories: 1C Cream Ale 18A Blonde Ale ...


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Moving the beer from the fridge to the closet is preferred. Yeast are sensitive to temperature changes, they handle going from cold to warm much better. Starting your fermentation at 23 C, while not terribly hot, will risk fusel alcohol production as the yeast are in a more hospitable environment and will consume the sugars more rapidly (by using these ...


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Yeas, moving what's in the fridge to the closet is a good plan. Temp control is most crucial for the first 3-4 days. After that, I always increase the temp to ensure complete fermentation.


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It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


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Temperature is your most likely culprit. Other possible cause could be not enough yeast in suspension. Typical if fining agents are used in secondary. You're probably past the window for only temp correction to help your existing bottles. The sweet and low carbonation, sounds like the yeast isn't doing much with the priming sugar. Either not enough or ...


3

Usually a warm fermentation 72°F+ will generate more yeast esters and fusel alcohols. The warmer temp makes for rapid yeast growth phase and easy feeding phase. This added growth could be your clairity issue, just having more unfloculated yeast in suspension. Fusels will mellow with aging 4-8 weeks. Clairity should improve over time 1-3 months, or use a ...


2

I use a wine fridge that I took the shelves out of. I can fit a 5 gallon fermenter into it. It has a digital temp display on the front and I set that to the temp I want, it works well for the German lagers I make. Most wne fridges I looked at when I was after one had a flat bottom big enough to take a 5 gallon fermenter.


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4 days was likely a little early to start chilling it. Most Ale yeasts will go dormant and start to flocculate if the temp drops significantly. I'd recommend that you warm it back up. Then carefully try to rouse the yeast by slowly swirling your fermentor until the yeast seem back up in suspension. Don't do this until you've warmed it up first. Take a ...


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Each yeast strain has an ideal temperature range to limit bad esters and phenols. Too hot can give the yeast too much room to play, while this is great for yeast health and reproduction they will produce esters that may not be desired, also larger molecule alcohols (fusels). So the temp is limited to isolate them to a specific metabolism that produces more ...


1

Check this out- The author brews two identical batches using a true lager yeast (Saflager 34/70) but ferments one at a "lager" temp of 50˚F/10˚C and the other up at 70˚F/21˚C. He then runs a taste test that included BJCP judges in the panel and found that they "were unable to reliably distinguish between pale lagers of the same recipe fermented 20˚F/11˚C ...


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The reason they say to ferment at that range is because it's within reach of the typical homebrewer without any additional equipment. The kit producers can then sell to the widest possible audience. To get the most lager-like results you can try: fermenting lower with the yeast you have - 17/18C will reduce the fruitiness (esters) that's produced use a ...


1

20-25°C, 68-77°F are Ale temps, Lagers ferment at 55°F or below. Above 72°F is usually only a few styles of Ales. There is a short time called a Diacetyl Rest where your Lager fermentation temperature is raised to 68°F for a couple of days at the end of primary. You really need good temp control for Lagers. Heating and Cooling.


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A keggarator is a good choice, if it's not in use for serving. I have an old BevAir it fits two 6g Itialian carboys nicely. If you have a good back, deep freezers work nice too. As far as a flat bottom fridge, all of them I've seen converted usually have a DIY second bottom to make it level. Whatever you choose you will need to add a digital temp ...


1

If its done fermenting getting it into bottles is better than a plastic bucket. All buckets absorb/transmit O2 at some rate. And depending on your lid, it might not be the plastic at all that's introducing O2. The O2 will ingress regardless of the CO2 unless its pressure is high (which it isn't). It will attempt to equilibrate no matter what. O2 comes ...


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There is one correct place: The same place that you used last time. :) The critical part is that you take a reading at the same place as this will give you consistency in your process. There is one "bad" place: the bottom of the kettle. Depending on your equipment you may get a high reading because the thick bottom is retaining heat, or showing a very low ...


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The technique may work, and in theory, provided good process handling, shouldn't pose any issues. Something to consider though is that grain contains on it many organisms, including lactobacillus and enterobacter. Without boiling neither of the organisms will be killed, and will also have been given time to grow in the wort during the mash. How well they ...


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My biggest concern would be botulism. If I'm not mistaken, unboiled wort is a very fertile breeding ground for that stuff. Even if "crash cooled in a freezer" I'd worry that too much of that bad stuff would stick around.


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I also use a water bath for controlling fermentation temps. I found a bluetooth weatherhawk temperature sensor that reports to a mobile app and it is waterproof. So I built an stc 1000 temp controller to selectively switch between an aquarium heater & small recirc pump on the hot side and a peltier liquid chiller on the cold side.


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There is certain equipment you simply need to brew. Wort chiller is one of them. Too much time and money goes into each batch to cut these corners. Plus, as mentioned before, wort chillers will save you time and money in the long run. Yeast will say the temp on the package and I usually see range about 76F and 82F. No need to chill wort to 60F, but 90F ...



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