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7

No way. You will kill everything in your beer at this temperature. The pasteurization process actually uses lower temps, probably with less exposure time, and kills them all. And its ok to use any beer yeast to carbonation, you don't need the same strain.


6

Warmer temperatures will allow the yeast to continue its work, cleaning up the beer. Colder temperatures will promote yeast flocculation which helps to clear the beer. It'd suggest leaving the beer in the fermentation temperature range for a week or two after the final gravity has been reached, and then moving it to the cooler basement to help it clear.


4

They sure have, at least in terms of the temperature/ABV% relationship. The table provided is for pure ethanol/water solutions so the freezing points provided will be slightly higher than for actual beer. Accounting for the effects of residual sugar, proteins and other things in solution seems incredibly complex; this is touched upon in some detail later in ...


4

I'm going to assume you're basically doing "batch sparging" (adding the sparge liquor in batches due to capacity), not that you're "step mashing" (using hot water infusions to move the whole mash through a set of different temperature "steps"). Once the enzymes are denatured, they are … denatured. :) They will not return or restart their ability to convert ...


4

Most of the heat is usually lost through the lid in coolers. Cooler lids are not well insulated. The bodies are. This is because they are meant to keep things cold not hot. Heat rises and a cooler lid isn't designed to actually handle it. Some coolers are better than others. I have used several and found wide differences. I found that if I covered the ...


3

It has been said that for every 10C of temperature increase the oxidation rate roughly doubles. So yes temperature does increase oxidation rate. In general increases in heat increase all chemical reactions.


3

I think you are over thinking and and mis-interpreting the point of the "theory of mashing" article. That table regarding mash temp and attenuation is only specific to the wort tested. It's meant as a demonstration of how increasing temps may make a less fermentable wort. Fermentability of a wort is based on much more than temperature of the mash. The ...


3

Be patient. It will carb, it will just take longer. Wait another week or so, then start sampling to see if it's carbed yet.


3

Take them out of the fridge if you'd like. Maybe leave one or two in as a "control" to see how the carbonation differs between the 3 groups. Skunking has nothing to do with entering and then exiting a fridge, and everything to do with light interacting with hopped beer.


2

By creating the starter, you are allowing the yeast to feed and propagate to the levels you require for your batch. I've had NB send me smack packs with an ice pack, and it arrived cold as expected (this was roundabout the beginning of September, so still pretty warm here). So, to answer your question more directly: Yes, you should be ok creating a starter ...


2

The Brewer's Association has the excellent Draught Beer Quality Manual freely available as a PDF (see the upper right corner of the page for the download). It discusses what you'll need to account for: both line length/resistance/elevation change calculation for balancing serving pressure, and long-draw cooling options (forced-air or glycol).


2

In general, yeast will die at temps exceeding 115F.


1

Since there is really no fermentation going on in secondary, temperature is of little concern. as log as you don't get too hot, not much else matters. In fact, there's seldom a need to do a secondary at all.


1

You wouldn't want a sudden drop in temperature, or too low (8C is way too low), the yeast might give up completely instead of helping the beer mature. 20C should be no problem, the yeast shouldn't be making any esters at this stage. It's also the preferred temperature for the early stage of bottle conditioning. This all assumes you're using a common ale ...


1

If not ruin it, it will make fairly bad beer. It is always better to wait til the wort reaches a good temp then to pitch the yeast at too high a temp. You can put the fermenter into a bathtub or other container and add cold water and ice to the water. Don't put ice directly into your wort. Ice is not sanitary and you risk contaminating your beer by doing ...


1

I think stirring is required even if you are running a watery mash with recirculation; you have to at least break up the clumps of dry grain before you can pump it. Heat doesn't seem to move easily through the mash anyways. Wort that is above the chiller will chill very, very slowly. I find that some wort will also stay hot on the bottom of my pot (on the ...


1

I would definitely recommend a different cooler. I find rectangular coolers are much easier to use and I've never had trouble holding temp in one. I have 48, 70, and 152 qt. coolers and never lose more than 1-2F over the course of the mash.


1

Idiot-proofing the fermentation temperatures has been a bit of a peeve of mine right now, as I use a family member's basement as a brewery and I have little control of the ambient room temperature. The DIY solution I am working on uses a $15 digital thermostat/controller with a sinkable probe from Ebay to switch on/off a typical brewing heat belt (a ...


1

For temperature coefficients of sugar solutions, this article empirically determines expansion coefficients for grape juice. For 22% brix, density at 20°C is 1.097 vs 1.065 at 80°C - which corresponds to a volume in increase of 3%. At 100°C the figure is closer to 4% as expected. The difference between using 4% and the actual temperature ...


1

It really depends upon how long it was between when you added priming sugar and put them in the fridge. If it were 3 or more days, then you can just leave them there. The question is really if the yeast had enough time to turn the sugar into CO2. This goes pretty quickly - just a few days if fresh yeast is used, but old yeast will take longer. The ...


1

A high gravity beer (high ABV) can take more than a month to carbonate at 70 degrees and if you let it get too cold it may never get to where you want it


1

Just called Robinar, manufacturer of refractometer I have. Posed the temperature compensation question to them and the response is: when calibrating the tool (IE: putting distilled water on the glass) make sure that test/calibtratiuon water is the same temp as the product/material to be tested.



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