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6

Warmer temperatures will allow the yeast to continue its work, cleaning up the beer. Colder temperatures will promote yeast flocculation which helps to clear the beer. It'd suggest leaving the beer in the fermentation temperature range for a week or two after the final gravity has been reached, and then moving it to the cooler basement to help it clear.


4

They sure have, at least in terms of the temperature/ABV% relationship. The table provided is for pure ethanol/water solutions so the freezing points provided will be slightly higher than for actual beer. Accounting for the effects of residual sugar, proteins and other things in solution seems incredibly complex; this is touched upon in some detail later in ...


4

I'm going to assume you're basically doing "batch sparging" (adding the sparge liquor in batches due to capacity), not that you're "step mashing" (using hot water infusions to move the whole mash through a set of different temperature "steps"). Once the enzymes are denatured, they are … denatured. :) They will not return or restart their ability to convert ...


3

Be patient. It will carb, it will just take longer. Wait another week or so, then start sampling to see if it's carbed yet.


3

It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


3

Moving the beer from the fridge to the closet is preferred. Yeast are sensitive to temperature changes, they handle going from cold to warm much better. Starting your fermentation at 23 C, while not terribly hot, will risk fusel alcohol production as the yeast are in a more hospitable environment and will consume the sugars more rapidly (by using these ...


3

Yeas, moving what's in the fridge to the closet is a good plan. Temp control is most crucial for the first 3-4 days. After that, I always increase the temp to ensure complete fermentation.


2

This article may hold the answers you seek: https://winemakermag.com/1254-soapy-wines-vintage-dates-wine-wizard "...I suspect you’ve got a fatty acid issue caused by your stuck/sluggish fermentation. S. cerevisiae can emit fatty acids when under fermentative stress..." Stuck fermentations can be caused by a lack of dissolved oxygen in the first few days of ...


2

If fermentation has finished and you're certain of that, the beer will benefit from getting it as cold as possible rather than leaving it warm. Cold crashing, as it's called, will help drop the yeast and leave you with a clearer beer. In addition, it will provide you with a crisper, cleaner flavor.


2

A little worried, perhaps, but regardless you should attempt to keep the yeast/beer itself in the yeast's ideal temperature range. If you have a temp controller, then look into getting some sort of "thermowell" to put the temp controller's sensor in the middle of the fermentor itself, but taping (and insulting) the probe against the side of the fermentor ...


2

The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


2

4 days was likely a little early to start chilling it. Most Ale yeasts will go dormant and start to flocculate if the temp drops significantly. I'd recommend that you warm it back up. Then carefully try to rouse the yeast by slowly swirling your fermentor until the yeast seem back up in suspension. Don't do this until you've warmed it up first. Take a ...


1

If its done fermenting getting it into bottles is better than a plastic bucket. All buckets absorb/transmit O2 at some rate. And depending on your lid, it might not be the plastic at all that's introducing O2. The O2 will ingress regardless of the CO2 unless its pressure is high (which it isn't). It will attempt to equilibrate no matter what. O2 comes ...


1

There is one correct place: The same place that you used last time. :) The critical part is that you take a reading at the same place as this will give you consistency in your process. There is one "bad" place: the bottom of the kettle. Depending on your equipment you may get a high reading because the thick bottom is retaining heat, or showing a very low ...


1

What the calculators are trying to estimate is how much CO2 from fermentation is still dissolved in the beer. The yeast produce CO2 during fermentation, most of which escapes into the atmosphere, but some remains in solution in the beer. The amount that remains is influenced by temperature and pressure. Assuming the pressure is nominally atmospheric, we only ...


1

Since there is really no fermentation going on in secondary, temperature is of little concern. as log as you don't get too hot, not much else matters. In fact, there's seldom a need to do a secondary at all.


1

You wouldn't want a sudden drop in temperature, or too low (8C is way too low), the yeast might give up completely instead of helping the beer mature. 20C should be no problem, the yeast shouldn't be making any esters at this stage. It's also the preferred temperature for the early stage of bottle conditioning. This all assumes you're using a common ale ...


1

If not ruin it, it will make fairly bad beer. It is always better to wait til the wort reaches a good temp then to pitch the yeast at too high a temp. You can put the fermenter into a bathtub or other container and add cold water and ice to the water. Don't put ice directly into your wort. Ice is not sanitary and you risk contaminating your beer by doing ...


1

The technique may work, and in theory, provided good process handling, shouldn't pose any issues. Something to consider though is that grain contains on it many organisms, including lactobacillus and enterobacter. Without boiling neither of the organisms will be killed, and will also have been given time to grow in the wort during the mash. How well they ...


1

My biggest concern would be botulism. If I'm not mistaken, unboiled wort is a very fertile breeding ground for that stuff. Even if "crash cooled in a freezer" I'd worry that too much of that bad stuff would stick around.


1

I also use a water bath for controlling fermentation temps. I found a bluetooth weatherhawk temperature sensor that reports to a mobile app and it is waterproof. So I built an stc 1000 temp controller to selectively switch between an aquarium heater & small recirc pump on the hot side and a peltier liquid chiller on the cold side.


1

A high gravity beer (high ABV) can take more than a month to carbonate at 70 degrees and if you let it get too cold it may never get to where you want it



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