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7

No way. You will kill everything in your beer at this temperature. The pasteurization process actually uses lower temps, probably with less exposure time, and kills them all. And its ok to use any beer yeast to carbonation, you don't need the same strain.


4

Most of the heat is usually lost through the lid in coolers. Cooler lids are not well insulated. The bodies are. This is because they are meant to keep things cold not hot. Heat rises and a cooler lid isn't designed to actually handle it. Some coolers are better than others. I have used several and found wide differences. I found that if I covered the ...


3

I think you are over thinking and and mis-interpreting the point of the "theory of mashing" article. That table regarding mash temp and attenuation is only specific to the wort tested. It's meant as a demonstration of how increasing temps may make a less fermentable wort. Fermentability of a wort is based on much more than temperature of the mash. The ...


3

I believe with all homebrewing that there is never a wasted batch, even the worst of the worst is an opportunity to learn something, so don't throw it out yet. You were lucky it was so late in the fermentation. The yeast won't die at the high temperature, and at this stage you may find you increased attenuation slightly. If a gravity reading indicates ...


3

Ideally, you want the liquid portion of the starter to be crystal clear, meaning no yeast is left in suspension. In this scenario, you carefully pour the liquid off the sediment, leaving a enough to swirl around, bringing the sediment up into suspension, and then pitch. If the starter is small (1 or 2 quarts), and the yeast hasn't settled out completely, ...


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


3

Take them out of the fridge if you'd like. Maybe leave one or two in as a "control" to see how the carbonation differs between the 3 groups. Skunking has nothing to do with entering and then exiting a fridge, and everything to do with light interacting with hopped beer.


3

If you are slow to raise temp between steps, you are in effect spending more time in each enzyme's temp range. This could have an effect on the beer. For instance, if you do a rest at 120ish with a well modified malt (which you shouldn't do anyway!), spending longer in that low temp range can ruin the body and foam of the beer. If you're at a beta rest ...


3

You have to base the choice on what temp you want to ferment at, not necessarily an analytical choice in the optimum range. Different points in that range will create certain flavor profiles, all temps will make beer. The profile you want comes from experience. You need to remember that the fermentation itself generates heat. I am sure that your temp ...


3

It has been said that for every 10C of temperature increase the oxidation rate roughly doubles. So yes temperature does increase oxidation rate. In general increases in heat increase all chemical reactions.


2

The primary function of secondary fermentation is clarification, not fermentation. (Unless you're fermenting something which requires a secondary fermentation addition, like a special yeast addition or dry hopping.) I've found great success by making sure the fermenting wort gravity is within 2-4 points of expected final gravity before transfer to secondary. ...


2

Try increasing your room temp for a about a week and then fridge overnight. If that doesn't help then it's back to the drawing board I'm afraid.


2

1) Do I raise after 3 days or some other amount? (Rule of thumb here as I'm not going to take gravity readings) Assuming you aren't taking gravity readings, therefor you aren't examining the apparent attenuation, your best bet is to wait until after high-krausen. This really depends on the gravity of the beer, what yeast your using (ale vs. lager, fast ...


2

By creating the starter, you are allowing the yeast to feed and propagate to the levels you require for your batch. I've had NB send me smack packs with an ice pack, and it arrived cold as expected (this was roundabout the beginning of September, so still pretty warm here). So, to answer your question more directly: Yes, you should be ok creating a starter ...


2

"Continuously" is overkill, "Periodically" is more reasonable. In my experience there are many variables: the insulation of the mash tun and the ambient temperature are the most influential. I used to mash in a round 10-gallon cooler. When the ambient temperature was warm (70F+), and the mash volume was sufficiently large (4-5 gallons+), I found that the ...


2

I think the most important thing you need to accomplish is understanding your brewery. Begin by taking notes. Record the temperature every time you take it throughout the mash. But be sure that the temperature is uniform by stirring thoroughly, this can and will be a frustration for you. Over time, you'll have a better idea for how much temperature you'll ...


2

In general, yeast will die at temps exceeding 115F.


2

Yes, pitching yeast well below its optimum temperature and allowing it to rise will increase the lag time as opposed to pitching it at the optimum temperature. One thing to avoid is pitching room temperature yeast into cold wort, or vice-versa. This will shock the yeast and potentially cause issues with fermentation depending on the extent of the ...


2

The Brewer's Association has the excellent Draught Beer Quality Manual freely available as a PDF (see the upper right corner of the page for the download). It discusses what you'll need to account for: both line length/resistance/elevation change calculation for balancing serving pressure, and long-draw cooling options (forced-air or glycol).


1

I would definitely recommend a different cooler. I find rectangular coolers are much easier to use and I've never had trouble holding temp in one. I have 48, 70, and 152 qt. coolers and never lose more than 1-2F over the course of the mash.


1

Idiot-proofing the fermentation temperatures has been a bit of a peeve of mine right now, as I use a family member's basement as a brewery and I have little control of the ambient room temperature. The DIY solution I am working on uses a $15 digital thermostat/controller with a sinkable probe from Ebay to switch on/off a typical brewing heat belt (a ...


1

For temperature coefficients of sugar solutions, this article empirically determines expansion coefficients for grape juice. For 22% brix, density at 20°C is 1.097 vs 1.065 at 80°C - which corresponds to a volume in increase of 3%. At 100°C the figure is closer to 4% as expected. The difference between using 4% and the actual temperature ...


1

It really depends upon how long it was between when you added priming sugar and put them in the fridge. If it were 3 or more days, then you can just leave them there. The question is really if the yeast had enough time to turn the sugar into CO2. This goes pretty quickly - just a few days if fresh yeast is used, but old yeast will take longer. The ...


1

Based on my experience, yes. Or rather, YES! You'd think that, with sufficient paddling, a uniform temperature should stay fairly uniform. I haven't found that to be the case. I'd hit (e.g.) the protein rest, stir the crap out of the mash, check and recheck the temp, and when I came back 10 or 15 minutes later it would be 10 degrees hotter in the middle, ...


1

The main point of raising the temp is simple. As the sugars become limiting the yeast begin to enter a dormancy phase. As yeast slow down the temp of your fermentation begins to lower too. That lowering temp is also a signal to yeast to go dormant. This causes a cyclical effect of potential having the yeast drop out sooner than you want and you do not ...


1

You may misunderstand what that temp range means. It's where the yeast company has determined you'll get optimum performance. Being outside of that range doesn't mean the yeast won't work. The effects are likely to be minimal to none.


1

I would take a gravity reading - depending upon what you brewed fermentation may already be over. In which case cold crashing would have been the right thing to do. Or you can raise the temperature of the yeast again and rouse the beer to help get the yeast back into conditioning the beer for another week. With temperature control, I've found that ...


1

Yes, wrapping the carboy in a towel will act as insulation and retain some of the heat. Fermwrap's do require some amount of trial and error to find their sweet spots. Keep in mind that while the Fermwrap is powered on, it is actively generating heat. Immediately cut the power, and while it is no longer generating heat, the wrap itself is still warm, ...


1

There's a couple of concerns regarding this: The longer your beer takes to begin fermentation, the longer it is prone to (more easily) become infected. Depending on how slowly it is being cooled, you may have clarity issues. You need to chill it quickly to form a good cold-break which is essential to clarity. That said, 8 hours isn't a terrible amount ...


1

Look up some information on no-chill brewing, which is a method for doing exactly that. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/No_Chill_Method One drawback is that if bacteria or wild yeast does make it into your wort, it will have a head start on growth, where otherwise the inoculation of brewer's yeast might overpower the bad bugs and minimize impact. ...



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