Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

1) Can I just place my fermentation tank in this tub of water to counter the heat? Yes. This will work to a degree (ha, ha.) The water is slowly but constantly evaporating. The energy need to make liquid water into gas comes out of the water's temperature. This "evaporative cooling" will help cool your wort by a few degrees. 2) Will this method work during ...


10

This method is sometimes referred to as a "swamp cooler", and is well known and used in homebrewing circles. Honestly, if the brew shop employee told you it wouldn't work then they are either (a) trying to sell you a brewing fridge, or (b) not that educated on homebrewing. Change out some ice packs in the water twice a day and you get get down to the low ...


7

Short answer - it's not that bad, per se. Long answer: The biggest 'problem' is consistency/isolation of variables. Particularly when all-grain brewing there are a lot of things to keep track of throughout the process. As you keep brewing, you'll want to aim to improve parts of your process, and you'll probably develop a few favorite recipes. In a ...


6

You may want to check out brewpi - it's a fermentation monitor, but isn't limited to just fermentation. The temperature devices used are DS18B20 temperature probes. You can get these pre-made in waterproof housing from sellers on ebay - the project also has a shop that sells them. The manufacturers claim they are accurate to +/- 0.5 C, although my tests ...


4

I have shipped much more fragile patient biological samples (which is what yeast are) from Mexico to the US for research purposes. One big issue is if they get caught up in customs. Our samples of course were red flagged because we said what they were and had all the paperwork ready and with the package (seriously don't they have anything better to do). We ...


4

First, unless the starter temp goes over maybe 90F, there is no damage to the yeast itself. second, for a starter of the size that you'll need for a tripel, the best course of action is to decant the spent wort before pitching so it won't have any flavor effect on your beer. remember, with a starter you're growing yeast, not making beer, and a starter ...


4

You can reuse the yeast - the temperature range top of 73°F is for the recommended fermentation profile. In the lab, researchers shock the yeast by raising the temperature from 25°C/77°F to 37°C/98°F and holding it there for several hours. Your brief venture into 85°F was short - 1.5 hours - so if any shock has occurred, it will be ...


4

Yes, there is a potential risk of bottle bombs, as with any incomplete ferment. The residual fermentables can be fermented by the remaining yeast in the bottle along with the priming sugar and produce more CO2 than intended. Ideally you should cold crash only after you are sure primary is complete. Many brewers simply leave the beer in primary for at least 2 ...


4

The aquarium heaters are not heating all of the water, but only the water around each heater. This will form convection currents around each heater - the heated water only moves upwards, and rises up to the surface, at the same time water at the surface cools and sinks. The convection currents are probably only a few inches around each heater, depending ...


3

Positive temperature swings have been discussed - fusels and esters are the main problems. If the temperature fluctuating then you'll also have negative swings. Negative temperature swings can cause the yeast to drop out. This is particularly true with the Belgian strains, such as WLP530 and WLP570 - even with constant ambient temperature, removing the heat ...


3

As you reduce the temperature you need to compensate with more yeast, just as you do when brewing a lager. E.g. for a 1.050 ale fermented at 60°F a 2 liter starter would be the minimum. Alternatively, if pitching from a smaller starter, increase the temperature slowly after primary fermentation is almost complete - e.g. 3 days or when you hit 75% of ...


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


3

It's certainly possible that the banana esters are due to warm fermentation temperature. After sanitation, I'd argue that the most important step in brewing is fermentation temperature. You want both the correct temperature for your yeast (each yeast varies so check the manufacturer), and a consistent temperature. The method you mentioned helps primarily ...


3

Yes, the process sounds reasonable, at least to an extent. The purpose of storing them at room temp is to allow refermentation to create carbonation. Then, ideally, you would keep them at 32-35 for two months to allow the beer to lager and the flavor to smooth out. An even better course of action would be to transfer to a secondary, keep that at 32-35 for ...


3

I assume you mean 40f, then yes way too cold. it won't harm the existing yeast organisms, but even for lager yeast that is too cold for primary fermentation. so basically we do things at certain temps for a reason... we try to pitch yeast at a temperature that gives them the advantage over other contaminant organisms. warm your wort to the primary ...


3

You have to base the choice on what temp you want to ferment at, not necessarily an analytical choice in the optimum range. Different points in that range will create certain flavor profiles, all temps will make beer. The profile you want comes from experience. You need to remember that the fermentation itself generates heat. I am sure that your temp ...


3

Ideally, you want the liquid portion of the starter to be crystal clear, meaning no yeast is left in suspension. In this scenario, you carefully pour the liquid off the sediment, leaving a enough to swirl around, bringing the sediment up into suspension, and then pitch. If the starter is small (1 or 2 quarts), and the yeast hasn't settled out completely, ...


3

I believe with all homebrewing that there is never a wasted batch, even the worst of the worst is an opportunity to learn something, so don't throw it out yet. You were lucky it was so late in the fermentation. The yeast won't die at the high temperature, and at this stage you may find you increased attenuation slightly. If a gravity reading indicates ...


3

If you are slow to raise temp between steps, you are in effect spending more time in each enzyme's temp range. This could have an effect on the beer. For instance, if you do a rest at 120ish with a well modified malt (which you shouldn't do anyway!), spending longer in that low temp range can ruin the body and foam of the beer. If you're at a beta rest ...


2

These are very thick bottles. While I wouldn't let them pressurize forever, if you keep them cold, wear leather work gloves, and bring them outside in a bucket of ice water, you should be able to open them safely (and messily). I also recommend using safety glasses. For safety (and cleanliness) reasons, I wouldn't try to save them. You might be ok if you ...


2

I'm actually in the exact same boat. Well.. Similar. Wasn't going to bother with the smartphone, but will have some form of communication. Here's what I have in mind I just ordered a USB Thermometer off Amazon that people have managed to get working in linux (specifically Ubuntu, but it sounds like it is agnostic to distros). From here I could whip up ...


2

Would placing the fermenter tank in a tub of water be a good way to handle hot environments? I started brewing extracts a couple of months ago and I started to do the "swamp cooler" method which sounds similar to that which you have postulated. The only difference is that I never replace the water. I would recommend using a outer bucket filled with water ...


2

The yeast will not necessarily drop out at 60F. I've used 1214 at that temp many times and I find it preferable to fermenting it at higher temps. In fact, I prefer fermenting pretty much any ale (and many lager) yeasts at or below the lower end of the temp range. You get cleaner beer with fewer esters and phenolics. I often ferment WY1007 and 1728 in the ...


2

You're measuring the temperature of the swamp cooler water and not the beer, and the beer will take a long time to reach the cooler water temperature, which will also rise in temp during the same period. This is because heat transfer between the beer and the cooling water is slow, since the surface area is small compared to the volume, plus both liquids are ...


2

While not the most elegant, you can go through the lid in a larger fermentor without a thermowell. I put this together without wanting to incur the cost of a thermowell - so I used some electrical tape, an extra hole opposite the airlock and a rubber grommet. I patiently and accurately wrapped the tape around the sensor wire, building it out so it fit nice ...


2

You can get esters from under-pitching as well as high temperature control, so skipping the yeast starter will be much worse than a starter without temp control, since you will be significantly underpitching. I'm guessing the Trippel was a fairly big beer, for which you need a proportionally larger yeast starter and then some. A 1.080 beer would need a 4 ...


2

I use ale yeasts at fairly low temps all the time and I haven't experienced any so far that have negative characteristics at 60F. Some, like WY1007, 1728, or 1056 even work fine down into the 50s. Yes, a lower temp will produce fewer esters, but in general that's what I'm looking for. Whether fewer esters are a positive or negative effect depends on what ...


2

The simple answer is yes: the yeast will actively be fermenting in your bottle, which will contribute to the flavor. However, the effect on the overall flavor will be very very small. I've read that some commercial breweries actually bottle condition with different strains of yeast, so as not to allow harvesting of their proprietary strains that do the main ...


2

@nhunsaker this sounds pretty standard to me. Most instructions on a beer kit will get you to prime the bottles with sugar for carbonation, then to store them in a warmer place so the carbonation process can start to take place. Then you are told to leave the bottles for two weeks in a cooler place. After that you can put them in the fridge then drink ...


2

The primary function of secondary fermentation is clarification, not fermentation. (Unless you're fermenting something which requires a secondary fermentation addition, like a special yeast addition or dry hopping.) I've found great success by making sure the fermenting wort gravity is within 2-4 points of expected final gravity before transfer to secondary. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible