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16

There are a few methods, each with advantages and drawbacks. Cool your Kettle Take your hot brew kettle, full of wort, and submerge it in ice water. Advantages: No real equipment expense, just take your pot and put it in a cooler or bathtub full of ice water. Drawbacks: Extremely slow, higher risk of contamination. Probably have to change out the ice ...


14

Pitching yeast into wort that is too warm can cause a number of problems. At the very worst, you'll shock the yeast and/or kill it, and you'll have a stuck fermentation. Another problem with pitching too warm (and maintaining fermentation too warm) is that it can cause the yeast to produce unwanted off-flavors in the beer. Letting the wort sit longer to ...


12

1) Can I just place my fermentation tank in this tub of water to counter the heat? Yes. This will work to a degree (ha, ha.) The water is slowly but constantly evaporating. The energy need to make liquid water into gas comes out of the water's temperature. This "evaporative cooling" will help cool your wort by a few degrees. 2) Will this method work during ...


10

With a beer that strong, you probably should have repitched at bottling. There are several factors that the yeast must fight in this situation, including: high alcohol strength - almost 10% ABV cool temperature - the bottom two degrees of the yeast's fermentation range long settling time - six weeks There's good news, though. That strain should be able ...


10

Whirlpool chilling utlilizes a pump and an immersion chiller. Many brewers that have an immersion chiller will find that an upgrade to a pump for other uses allows them to get better chilling from the immersion chiller. A whirlpool chiller uses a pump to pull wort from the base of the kettle, then returns the wort to the top of the kettle. The return is ...


10

This method is sometimes referred to as a "swamp cooler", and is well known and used in homebrewing circles. Honestly, if the brew shop employee told you it wouldn't work then they are either (a) trying to sell you a brewing fridge, or (b) not that educated on homebrewing. Change out some ice packs in the water twice a day and you get get down to the low ...


8

It's best to keep it as constant as possible until the primary fermentation is complete. It can be critical when you are reaching the end of fermentation to adjust the temperature slightly as there is not as much heat being produced from yeast reactions. If the temperture drops a couple of degrees certain strains of yeast can flocculate too soon leaving ...


8

The temperature rise will be depend on how vigorous the fermentation is, and on the volume and shape of the vessel you ferment in. You'll see a temperature rise of about 5-10 degrees on the homebrew scale, in my experience. Still, it varies widely. I would suggest getting one of the thermometer strips available at your local homebrew shops. They are ...


8

Yeast work better at warmer temps, and at this point you want the yeast to ferment the priming and carb your beer. That means you should keep the beer around 70-75°F (21-24°C) while you're trying to carb it. Once it's carbed, putting it in the fridge will not only aid the dissolution of CO2 into the beer, but will also retard staling. At this point, your ...


8

There are several things to consider here. Certainly slowing down your boil will change your rate of evaporation, but that's only a problem if you're having a hard time hitting your target volumes. The main consideration is your bitterness contribution from hops. Alpha acid isomerization, like most chemical reactions, is temperature dependent. It happens at ...


7

Temp swings can cause problems, but temps as high as what you've got can cause even worse problems. Keep in mind that fermentation is an exothermic process. Therefore, you should chill your wort to below the temp you want to ferment at and then let it rise to the proper range. Don't sacrifice beer quality and flavor for a short lag time or fast ...


7

74-78F is on the warm side, so you'll want to reduce time spent at that temperature to a minimum to reduce the chance of staling reactions from affecting the beer. On the plus side, the high temperature means the yeast won't need more than 3 days to ferment the priming sugars and clean up, after which you can then chill the bottles for a few days to allow ...


7

I would get hold of another sachet of yeast as a backup. If you have a local homebrew store, almost any type of yeast will work for this kit, but I'd recommend Safale US-05 if you can get that, since that will give you a cleaner profile. If they have liquid yeasts, then Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001 will produce equivalent results. Once you've got hold of ...


7

Short answer - it's not that bad, per se. Long answer: The biggest 'problem' is consistency/isolation of variables. Particularly when all-grain brewing there are a lot of things to keep track of throughout the process. As you keep brewing, you'll want to aim to improve parts of your process, and you'll probably develop a few favorite recipes. In a ...


6

Both questions resolve to the same issue - there's a chance of something other than your yeast taking over the nice environment you've made for microbes. By not letting it cool sufficiently, you risk killing off enough yeast that something else can muscle in. Unfortunately, the longer you let the wort sit before pitching your yeast, the more likely that ...


6

The bulk of the starch-sugar conversion happens in the first 15 minutes of the mash, so that's probably not a big problem. You might need to mash for 90-120 minutes rather than 60 to get a really good, full conversion, though. I usually have to do a longer mash when I'm mashing "cool" (which you are), anyway.


6

You may want to check out brewpi - it's a fermentation monitor, but isn't limited to just fermentation. The temperature devices used are DS18B20 temperature probes. You can get these pre-made in waterproof housing from sellers on ebay - the project also has a shop that sells them. The manufacturers claim they are accurate to +/- 0.5 C, although my tests ...


5

You most certainly can do a decoction at home. And decoction does more than just increase the temperature of the mash. The primary reason for it is melanoidin production in the wort. This creates a complexity of malt flavors in the wort that might not be there otherwise. I have several friends that have done it. Watching it being done its not hard, just ...


5

Play around with the temperature until you find what you like. I tend to leave my fridge around +45°F (or +7°C). I've found that gives me temperature I like best across styles. Here's a general temperature guide for styles.


5

You'd be best to check on the yeast package for the optimal fermentation temperature range. Both Wyeast and White labs have this info on their respective websites. There you can find the range, and figure what type of yeast will work best. Generally, the cooler the fermentation temperature, the cleaner, but longer the fermentation will take.


5

Beer absorbs more CO2 when it's cold than when it's warm. Since your beer has been cold, it's reabsorbed some of the CO2 created during fermentation. You need to take that into account, whether bottling or kegging, or your beer will be overcarbonated. Most priming calculators let you enter the temp of the beer to ascertain the amount of priming sugar or ...


5

All temperatures are in expressed in degrees F. correction = 1.313454 - 0.132674*F + 0.002057793*F*F - 0.000002627634*F*F*F SG_corrected = SG + (correction * 0.001) http://www.primetab.com/formulas.html agrees with http://brewery.org/library/HydromCorr0992.html


5

This sounds about right. A bigger brew doesn't always hit FG within 4 days. I'm sure you'll be fine leaving it another week. The mash temperature is high, so this could have produced a larger than normal amount of non-fermentables, leading to a high FG. But, I wouldn't make that conclusion until after at least another week has passed, with an ambient temp ...


5

During the start of the fermentation the Yeast reproduces quickly using the oxygen present in the beer and produces diacetyl which imparts a buttery flavor. Which is why it is usually recommended to start the fermentation at a lower temperature to slow down the diacetyl production (and the reproduction rate, I suppose). The beer fermentation is then ...


5

If your wort was at 80°F/27°C, you definitely didn't kill your yeast. Yeast thrive at temperatures well into the 90s, and can survive significantly higher. You don't want to ferment at that temperature, though, and likewise you don't want to pitch that warm because immediately dropping the temperature can cause your yeast to flocculate early.


4

Carbonate the bottles at 60-70F like ales is fine. There is so little fermentation going on you have very little "non-lager" character contributions from the yeast carbonating at that temp. When worrying about the temperature remember that many brewers routinely ramp up the temp for a couple days to perform a diacetyl rest and that temp bump doesn't harm ...


4

A few things on fermentation.... Airlock activity is not an indication of fermentation. Just because you don't see bubbles and a hear a gurgling airlock does not mean that your wine is not fermenting. To take readings you need a hydrometer. A hydrometer measures a liquids gravity (or density). Liquid is more dense with sugar, and less with out. As yeast ...


4

From White Labs Yeast Storage and Maintenance: As yeast sit in storage, they consume their glycogen reserves. Glycogen deprivation weakens their cell walls, and makes them more susceptible to rupture. Cold temperatures retard this process, but you want to avoid freezing yeast, as ice crystals will also rupture cells. The ideal storage ...


4

In addition to everyone else's comments, I would add that temperature swings within the first 72 hours are dangerous for the flavor of the beer, but outside of that window, the fermentation is mostly finished, in terms of volume, so it's harder to ruin the flavor. It sounds like you were barely outside that window. However, you were definitely too warm for ...


4

In the first couple days of active fermentation, the beer itself can rise to as much as 10F over ambient temp. That's why it's always best to chill your wort to a bit below fermentation temp and let the activity of fermentation bring it into the correct range. 17C would be an excellent temp for the beer. Be sure that you measure the beer temp, not the ...



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