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6

You may want to check out brewpi - it's a fermentation monitor, but isn't limited to just fermentation. The temperature devices used are DS18B20 temperature probes. You can get these pre-made in waterproof housing from sellers on ebay - the project also has a shop that sells them. The manufacturers claim they are accurate to +/- 0.5 C, although my tests ...


4

You are doing the right thing. Ambient temperature (aka the air temperature inside the chest) can go low like this, but since the probe is taped to the fermentation vessel, and the controller is calling for chilling, then chilling is what is needed. The thermal mass of the chest walls, cooling tubes, freon, and the air in the chest all might be below your ...


3

Although it doesn't say they are food safe, those plastics are relatively safe at room temperature. Beer lines are made from PVC and PTFE is used a lot in kitchenware. Of course, we don't know exactly how they have been processed/handled, this is still guesswork. No-one here can tell you if they are food safe/acid-safe etc.. just by looking at them. An ...


3

It uses peltier devices - a thermoelectric cooling/heating device - when a current is applied they chill on one side and warm the other. They're quite common but relatively inefficient in terms of energy compared to a compressor that you'd find in a fridge. Their efficiency is based on how quickly you can dissipate the heat generated. Thermal design is a key ...


2

As long as the stainless part of the probe is the only part that will be in the liquid, I believe you will not need a thermowell. A thermowell is generally used to protect a non-submersible probe or thermocouple. Image source. It's also good for getting deeper into the carboy than your probe will allow. E.g. I use a 24" thermowell in my conical to reach ...


2

While not the most elegant, you can go through the lid in a larger fermentor without a thermowell. I put this together without wanting to incur the cost of a thermowell - so I used some electrical tape, an extra hole opposite the airlock and a rubber grommet. I patiently and accurately wrapped the tape around the sensor wire, building it out so it fit nice ...


2

I'm actually in the exact same boat. Well.. Similar. Wasn't going to bother with the smartphone, but will have some form of communication. Here's what I have in mind I just ordered a USB Thermometer off Amazon that people have managed to get working in linux (specifically Ubuntu, but it sounds like it is agnostic to distros). From here I could whip up ...


1

I recently installed a weldless blichmann Brewmometer and reading the specifications for it, it recommended to install it at least 6" of the bottom. This recommended minimum height was not in order for the temperature-probe to always be in the center, or even immersed in the liquid at all times, but to prevent the heat from the stove/cooker "rolling" over ...


1

I am convinced that the answer is that the PTFE probe is definitely safe, and it is unclear whether the PVC is safe, or whether it would leach unknown quantities of pthalates into your beer. PTFE is the chemical name for Teflon. As we know, Teflon is considered chemically inert and safe for use in food applications, including on no-stick cookware, as long ...


1

WOW! good detailed question! I have no actual experience with this specifically but I can sympathise with the chemical/material compatibility question. I have most always had success with searching the great world wide web, with "*** vs. ****", in your case "PVC vs. alcohol" (by the way a search for Polyvinyl Chloride worked better than "PVC"). In the link ...


1

AFAIK, the Johnson probes are not waterproof, so you should not place them into the wort/beer. Either get a thermowell so you can read the temp of the beer itself (ideal), or tape the probe to the outside of the carboy. If you do that latter, you can continue to use your RPi recording approach on this brew. Going forward, you have a number of options… 1/ ...


1

I think that it depends a lot on the yeast you're using, the beer you're using it in and where that beer is in its life-cycle (:D). If you made a particularly large starter of especially hearty yeast and it's at day 2.5 peak-Krausen, it will take a lot more abuse than a beer on it's third week in primary made with 5th generation yeast you underpitched. ...


1

Given that you're fermenting in buckets, then you need a straight-walled thermowell, like this: You put the thermowell through the lid of the bucket and down into the beer. The temperature probe slides inside the thermowell. The tricky part is to then make an airtight seal with the bucket lid. You can either buy a stopper with a hole, or a grommet. The ...


1

If you are into brewing (daa) and want to get your hands dirty(er) (into programming and electronics) you migth check "the electric imp" a relative simple and small datalogging device. It's well documented, user friendly, web avaliable and It also connects to your home wifi Here is a full instructable implementing a temperature web sensor. Total cost: ...



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