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As a general rule, any recipe needs to be adapted to the equipment/setup you use. Narrower kettles, with a smaller surface of the liquid in contact with the air will lose less voulem to evaporation, for example. To make up for the difference, you can adpat your initial boiling volume ; add water later in your brewing process (nothing wrong with that as ...


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Reduce your heat, you only need a low rolling boil. Reduce the surface area of the wort. ( Use a narrow pot) There's nothing wrong with topping off with sanitary water. Its a common practice known as a partial boil.


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My process involves soaking the bottles in a bucket of Napisan or similar for a day or so, then using a butter knife, whittle off the soggy labels. For any remaining glue, grab a Magic Eraser and give them a scrub. The micro abrasion of the Magic Eraser works a treat. This method allows me to de-label up to 100 bottles in under an hour.


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Mineral Terpentine ("terps") is magic for those labels with really tough adhesive. Peel / scrape the label off as best you can. Then just a small amount on a rag works wonders. Rub on gently, then after a couple of seconds as the solvent action kicks in rub a bit harder. Then wash off well in soapy water. I had several Epic empties. Some of their labels use ...


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In "How to Brew", John Palmer claims that if you wrap a bottle top with aluminum foil and then sanitize it in the oven, the bottle will remain sanitized indefinitely (as long as the top stays wrapped in foil).


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I've never had a problem with infection when adding raspberries to the secondary with my chocolate raspberry stout, but by then, the alcohol was at nearly 8%. I usually add about 3# fresh or previously frozen for a crisp, subtle flavor that paired beautifully with the chocolate. It aged in the bottle very well, as the berry flavor stayed intact. I wonder, ...



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