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6

First, happy National Homebrew Day celebration day. I hope you have a LHBS or club that is participating in the Big Brew. Gravity is a measure of sugar in your wort, and the more fermentable sugars you give your yeast to munch on, the more that yeast will pee alcohol. To get gravity without booze, you provide yeast more of the stuff they can’t consume. ...


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A good article from Brew Your Own. "Tastes Great! Less Alcohol!" Then there is the style guidelines which includes commercial examples. 2008 BJCP Style Guidelines Category 8 — English Pale Ale


4

You'll get the best flavor if you use whole, and coarsely crack it before adding.


3

I buy whole coriander and use a mortar and pestle to crack the shells before adding it to the boil. Whole coriander keeps longer and will give a fresher aroma than pre-ground. To grind it at home, a coffee grinder would probably be overkill. You only need to break the shells. If you don't have a mortar and pestle, you can use a meat tenderizing hammer (or ...


3

While I've made vodka-based tinctures of all sorts of spices and herbs for addition to beer, I think the volume needed for fruit would be problematic. While most spices are used in the 1oz/5gl ratio and you can get away with a couple-hundred mL of tincture addition, most fruit additions are closer to 1lb/1gl, where a couple-thousand ml of tincture will ...


3

This is not a great hobby if your goal is to save money on beer costs. It takes a long time to recoup the cost of equipment when you save pennies per glass. And there is always more equipment to try... That being said, the cheapest and lowest risk way to get into the hobby with making one-gallon batches. You can get a one-gallon recipe/ingredient kit from ...


2

Boiling 6 gallons on a 3.5 kW induction top works flawlessly.


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If you're looking to add real fruit to any brew you'll want to do so in secondary to get the most flavor. I've had really good success in taking my fruit of choice and pureeing it in a food processor with little vodka - about 1/4 cup per 2lb of fruit seems a good balance. The vodka will help kill off any additional bugs that may have made it past washing ...


2

I always do all my hop aditions without bags. Recently I've try dry hop in the serving keg with bags and liked, becouse otherwise it would clog my line, but on the boil, I don't think it is very useful, since the hop material will be easy left behind with break material on the kettle. If you don't be able to let it behind, it will be nice on the fermentor ...


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I don't believe most wine makers make these decisions up front, at least not for juice that they have not worked with before. Instead, you taste the wine at packaging time and then adjust accordingly with glycerin for sweetness or acids for tartness. Commercial producers may blend finished wines, but ultimately it involves tasting throughout the whole ...


2

It really depends on the style, how much time you have, your setup and ultimately how clear you want your beer. For lighter colored beers I'll generally use a bag for dry hopping (make sure you sanitize it first.) Nylon straining bags, cheesecloth or even bags designed for paint sprayers work. Bigger beers I'm more likely to just add the hops directly to ...


1

It is normal for the air lock to slow way down after a couple days. It may bubble only once every few minutes. (And a watched pot never boils!) However, you may also have a bad seal. You can use the soapy water trick - mix a drop of dish soap in a glass of water. Then dab the water around the edge of seal and look for bubbles.


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You don't mention specifics of sanitation in your description above, but you do mention the "warming" of some of the raw juice to desolve extra sugar. This implies that the rest of your raw juice was not warmed. Was all of the raw juice ever boiled to remove the natural yeast and other fawna from the skins? If not, your medium sherry might be the result ...


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I use bags for all whole hop additions. I use muslin bags that have a very open weave. I also account for the theoretical 10% loss when using a bag by using 10% more hops.


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I either add aroma hops without a bag like @jards or use cheese cotton cloth. The mesh of cheese cloth is very coarse (large holes) compared to the nylon bags I've seen and should let the wort and the hops get to know each other very well. Even though cheese cloth lets a few hop bits through the cleanup is much easier than leaving the hops free.


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I have added fruit directly to my secondary, once after boiling, and once after freezing. Both times worked. From what I've read the tincture method is to disolve the flavor in spirits (similar to making sloe gin http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/sloegin_7722 ) Do you mean to add spirits to the brew? I would approach this with caution. Too much alcohol ...


1

I always recommend to novice brewers that they try to make a 1 gallon batch before investing in all the equipment. Most people already have kitchen equipment suitable for making 1 gallon of beer and any additional equipment is easy to find like a 1 gallon glass or plastic jug. Any decent homebrew supply shop should sell 1lb bags of malt which you can make a ...


1

After startup cost of equipment, ingredients can be cheap if you brew within a somewhat narrow style range and buy ingredients in bulk. That said you can almost eliminate startup costs if you choose to brew in smaller batch sizes that allows you to use equipment you already have. Like your largest stock pot and you sink for chilling. As you get better at ...


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The more you do (the less others do for you) and the more you buy the cheaper it will be. Go all-grain, grind your own grain, buy in bulk. Assuming you can store them properly, begin buying base malts and hops in larger volumes. Since you'll likely have only a few malt varieties on hand, you 'll need to adjust your recipes to use the base malts you have ...


1

Hardness is only one component of water. You need to look at the full analysis to see what's causing it in order to know what to do about it. Then, use a water spreadsheet (I recommend Bru'nwater https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/) to calculate how to correct for it. Your fears about water additions are unfounded. If done correctly, no off flavors ...


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I've had some excellent beer, such as Lost Abbey Judgement Day that used raisins or prunes in secondary, which give a very rich, caramel flavor that compliments big malty high alcohol and aged styles.


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We did some fruit pale ales last year with dehydrated fruit. We have a dehydrator and dried the fruit at 165 to kill off baddies and sealed it up till use. We did pineapple, kiwis, strawberries and chili peppers, non had any infection, even 6 months after. So it's an idea. Also the strawberry tasted amazing!



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