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8

In my experience it can differ between maltsters, but Weyermann offers both PDF and video instructions on opening their bags (the video is pretty awesome), which are fairly applicable to other brands of malt. ~edit~ There's also this video. ~another edit~ My own personal method for this, which I find works pretty much 100% of the time, with any bag: ...


6

I don't think it's a good idea, but might depend on product. You know why brown bottles are more popular than green or clear? Because light creates bad flavor and aroma in most beers. In my country it's known as skunks aroma. Strong UV lamp will do the same, only much faster. As far as I know, wine doesn't like light either. But I believe there might be some ...


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. ...


4

Here is a good test of what you are looking to do. http://brulosophy.com/2014/08/12/primary-only-vs-transfer-to-secondary-exbeeriment-results/ Here is the conclusion of the test: Once all the data was collected and I wasn’t worried about blowing through these kegs of beer, I started serving it to people stopping by. On a few occasions, with folks who ...


4

Just do it Nothing you described is needed or beneficial with modern liquid yeast packages. For example Weast's Activator: The Activator™ package was designed with superior UV light- and oxygen-barrier material to extend shelf life, making our 6 month from manufacture date Product Warranty possible. Yeast slowly depletes energy reserves while in ...


4

Make sure you have a healthy yeast in the proper pitch amount. Ferment primary at the cold end of the yeast strains tolerance. A long secondary / aging helps break down fusel alcohols. Yeast needs nutrients and oxygen mainly for their growth phase. This can be substituted by pitching a massive amount of yeast. For example pitching wort on top of a yeast ...


4

There's a few ways to get to a Berliner Weiße: Sour mash: introduce lactobacillus to the mash, hold around 120°F (and ideally anaerobically) for 2-3 days to sour. Boil and ferment normally and neutrally. Kettle sour: perform the mash, introduce lacto to the wort, hold at temp, boil and ferment. Lactic acid sour: introduce lactic acid either to the kettle ...


4

Ginger juice alone does not have enough sugar to be fermentable. However, ginger beer is a popular, slightly alcoholic beverage made from ginger root, sugar, water and citric acid. Take a look at this question and answer.


3

Temperature is your most likely culprit. Other possible cause could be not enough yeast in suspension. Typical if fining agents are used in secondary. You're probably past the window for only temp correction to help your existing bottles. The sweet and low carbonation, sounds like the yeast isn't doing much with the priming sugar. Either not enough or ...


3

Corn sugar is a monosaccharide where cane sugar is a disaccharide. Both are entirely fermentable but the disaccharide must be cleaved first. If your yeast are stressed they'll have a easier time with the monosaccharide. Corn sugar monosaccharide is usually glucose. There is some evidence that glucose fermentations produce higher ester levels. All things ...


3

In short corn sugar is more similar to the sugars in the wort so it's easy for the yeast to consume both. Other sugars are harder or easier for the yeast to consume and come with their own issues. Typically corn sugar is preferred. As adjuct and priming sugar.


3

The microbes that are present in the juice (from the skins of the apple and on the press itself) will eventually replicate and start to metabolize the sugars in the juice. If, by "bad", you mean "poisonous or harmful to you", then the answer is that it will not be harmful or bad, except for the harmful effects of alcohol. The acids and alcohol created by ...


3

Hey experimenting is half the fun of brewing! If you keep good notes on recipes and final product you can really start to understand what works together and produce better and better beer. Without knowing what your grain bill I would say this looks a little aggressive. As a reference, let's say you were shooting for a 1.065 o.g. (6.5% ish) your current hop ...


3

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


2

I also wants to share my experience with this device (Lauter grant). Actually I am chemical engineer and working in brewery designing company. Advantages of Lauter grant: It acts as buffer tank between lauter tun and wort kettle. It gives positive suction to transfer pump (full flow) Main advantage of later grant is: it avoid choking bed. as it avoid ...


2

All those answers above used to be the way to go. Since then, Best Malz has introduced Red X malt. It gives you the reddest color I've ever seen, especially if you use it as 100% of your grist.


2

That depends on the question you want to answer. bottling the primary-only batch after a week but leaving bottles for the extra week to let the primary-secondary batch catch up and How does the beer taste if we bottle a week early? leaving the batch in primary for an extra week (assuming we weren't disturbing it by transferring a lot of it for ...


2

If you want to experiment with the difference between "primary-only" and "primary-secondary", then rack half of your batch into a new fermentor, and bottle both halves at the same time.


2

You can do a partial-volume boil, diluting the boil volume with sanitary water. In fact, this is a great way to chill the batch. Your hop utilization in particular will be affected by a partial-volume boil. You'll probably only be able to boil 2 or 2.5gl in a 3gl pot. And in any case, watch out for the very likely, and very messy, boilover.


2

Methanol is formed when fermenting beverages high in pectins - eg grapes and berries. The methanol comes from the pectin, which mainly composed of methyl esters of galactose. When pectin breaks down, by enzymes introduced by micro organisms, or deliberately introduced, the methyl esters combine with water to produce methanol, so the aim should be to leave ...


2

Hmmn that’s an interesting one I would probably drop the molasses and swap to agave syrup and use Citra hops 3-5 grams and then do a dry hop with a bunch of mint. Also since a mojito has a very clean flavor profile I would probably do a lager of some sort so that at least narrows down your yeast a little. Assuming your talking about making a beer like a ...


2

I'm assuming you mean the mojito cocktail, made with mint and lime. A North Carolina brewery called NoDa Brewing does a mojito-inspired beer called the NoDajito. You might want to look into that for inspiration. They went all the way with the mojito theme and used mint leaves and lime zest. I'm not quite sure why you'd want to add molasses to the beer, or ...


2

I would use cider yeast (like WLP775 or WYeast 4766). I think strong hop flavors would be out of place, so I would go for aged hops (like people do for p-lambic), and something low-alpha with citrus notes (Strisselspalt would fit the bill). I agree you should ditch the molasses – mojitos are typically made with white rum, which would not have any molasses ...


1

It would need some Amino Acids, or at least some nitrogenous compounds to make AAs from. It would ferment some what with out, but it will need some nitrogenous compounds to grow and thrive.


1

I have never contacted a facility to do this for me, but have in the past purchased drinks, or tablets/capsules that have the probiotic organism I am interested in and grown up cultures from them and then used these to make a starter. I have not done it in the most scientific way. Saying that if you were to get the sample, mix it into solution then plate it ...


1

I have made ginger beer from regular old yeast before so there is nothing inherent about ginger that makes it unsuitable for yeast fermentation. Yeast technically speaking is a fungus not bacteria so how things that have anti bacterial qualities interact with fungi I'm not sure.


1

I was going to make this a comment, but it ended up pretty long and there wasn't space... I think there is often confusion here over just what "dead space" means. Most brew software assumes all liquid under the false bottom is not returned to the kettle, but that isn't always true depending on your equipment. In my particular setup, I need 1/2 gal of ...


1

Looks pretty reasonable, although as Ryan noted, 2 oz. Columbus at 60 minutes will be quite bitter. Personally, I find that boiling Columbus for more than 30 minutes results in a harsh bitterness that lingers far too long on my tongue. (I wake up tasting it the next day.) For that reason, I no longer use Columbus for bittering. I generally stick with Magnum ...


1

The technique may work, and in theory, provided good process handling, shouldn't pose any issues. Something to consider though is that grain contains on it many organisms, including lactobacillus and enterobacter. Without boiling neither of the organisms will be killed, and will also have been given time to grow in the wort during the mash. How well they ...


1

My biggest concern would be botulism. If I'm not mistaken, unboiled wort is a very fertile breeding ground for that stuff. Even if "crash cooled in a freezer" I'd worry that too much of that bad stuff would stick around.



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