Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

14% would be pretty high, even for high gravity yeasts, but 11% is definitely realistic. There are a few tricks to getting high ABV. You want really good aeration so that the yeast are healthy, often this means aerating when pitching and again the day after. You also may want to add sugar slowly instead of putting it all in at once. This is easy with ...


6

First, happy National Homebrew Day celebration day. I hope you have a LHBS or club that is participating in the Big Brew. Gravity is a measure of sugar in your wort, and the more fermentable sugars you give your yeast to munch on, the more that yeast will pee alcohol. To get gravity without booze, you provide yeast more of the stuff they can’t consume. ...


4

A good article from Brew Your Own. "Tastes Great! Less Alcohol!" Then there is the style guidelines which includes commercial examples. 2008 BJCP Style Guidelines Category 8 — English Pale Ale


3

This is not a great hobby if your goal is to save money on beer costs. It takes a long time to recoup the cost of equipment when you save pennies per glass. And there is always more equipment to try... That being said, the cheapest and lowest risk way to get into the hobby with making one-gallon batches. You can get a one-gallon recipe/ingredient kit from ...


3

Sounds like you're experiencing hangover-like symptoms. Hangovers from homebrew can be caused by fusel alcohols. Fusels are generally considered to be an "off" flavor and in large amounts create a hot, solventy taste (think paint thinner, or bad vodka). You didn't mention anything about your fermentation, but fusel production is generally the result of high ...


3

For very high gravity beers, you can use White Labs Super High Gravity Yeast - WLP099. It has a stated alcohol tolerance of 25%. You can use just this yeast, or use the regular yeast that you want to use to produce the dominant flavor profile, and then pitch WLP099 when fermentation is 2/3 complete (ideally, from an active fermenting starter comprising the ...


2

A hop tea may work. However, the bitterness extracted from hops at pH > 6 becomes progressively harsher with higher pH. Thus, to get a more rounded bitterness, you should not boil in plain water, which has a pH > 7. You could try boiling the hops in a little of the fermented beer, since this will have pH in the ball park of what you need. (Fermented beer is ...


2

Both Denny Conn and mdma were correct to some extent. I am not able to pick who answered the question fully at this go of it. So I’ll answer with my own results and hope others experiment further to dial in the process. I planned on splitting a 5 gallon batch all along for comparison so I wouldn't feel it wasn't wasted if it didn't turn out. The design ...


2

I don't believe most wine makers make these decisions up front, at least not for juice that they have not worked with before. Instead, you taste the wine at packaging time and then adjust accordingly with glycerin for sweetness or acids for tartness. Commercial producers may blend finished wines, but ultimately it involves tasting throughout the whole ...


1

I always recommend to novice brewers that they try to make a 1 gallon batch before investing in all the equipment. Most people already have kitchen equipment suitable for making 1 gallon of beer and any additional equipment is easy to find like a 1 gallon glass or plastic jug. Any decent homebrew supply shop should sell 1lb bags of malt which you can make a ...


1

After startup cost of equipment, ingredients can be cheap if you brew within a somewhat narrow style range and buy ingredients in bulk. That said you can almost eliminate startup costs if you choose to brew in smaller batch sizes that allows you to use equipment you already have. Like your largest stock pot and you sink for chilling. As you get better at ...


1

The more you do (the less others do for you) and the more you buy the cheaper it will be. Go all-grain, grind your own grain, buy in bulk. Assuming you can store them properly, begin buying base malts and hops in larger volumes. Since you'll likely have only a few malt varieties on hand, you 'll need to adjust your recipes to use the base malts you have ...


1

Hardness is only one component of water. You need to look at the full analysis to see what's causing it in order to know what to do about it. Then, use a water spreadsheet (I recommend Bru'nwater https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/) to calculate how to correct for it. Your fears about water additions are unfounded. If done correctly, no off flavors ...


1

The general ideas of hop bitterness, flavor and aroma related to time in the boil to hold true. Continual hopping doesn't generally produce any different aromas or flavors in my experience. In fact when over done the beer can taste fairly grassy. I don't know of too many brewers that do this still. Its labor intensive and has a fairly low return for ...


1

I would suspect adding all that pulp only you'll get hazy beer from all the fruit tannins. And those tannins may lead to a weird astringency depending on the type of fruit. But to experiment, I'd add it in secondary. Adding it at boils end would certainly generate pectin haze. It might not hurt to run some sanitizer through the juicer first.


1

You can. In fact this is what Jack Keller recommends. It is a second (or third in your case) fermentation to keep clean. Make sure you taste it first. A growler will get you a 1/2 gallon. You can use a drilled rubber stopper to add an airlock.


1

Since you don't necessarily need the beer to be completely non-alcoholic, perhaps you could consider brewing an small (session) beer instead? Mashing at the higher end, perhaps with some flavourful caramel malts, wheat or rye for extra body and an small grain bill should give you a head start. I did some experiences with second (and third) runnings from ...


1

You cannot make a truly alcohol free beer. The best commercial brewers can do is get it down to about .5% ABV. At home, most report that about 1.5% ABV can be achieved with boiloff. However, it is reported to have a severely negative impact on flavor. Having tried this, I would advise you not to waste your time. The bitterness is concentrated, not ...


1

I've probably bought that same pack, and the fact they don't list the ingredients in proportion is annoying. I guess they figure its "trade secrets" or whatever. Making the assumption that this isn't your first partial mash beer, I would suggest that you partial-mash normally, using the same water and minerals (if any) that you KNOW make good beer. The ...


1

I've had some excellent beer, such as Lost Abbey Judgement Day that used raisins or prunes in secondary, which give a very rich, caramel flavor that compliments big malty high alcohol and aged styles.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible