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12

Perceived sweetness has a lot to do with balance. A beer with an FG of 1.025 sounds sweet based on that number, but if the IBU level is high or, better yet, well balanced, the beer won't be cloying. Similarly and coversely, a beer that finishes nearly dry at, say, 1.005 could taste quite sweet if the IBUs are low and the alcohol content is high. Alcohol ...


6

Make a "graff" which is a malted cider. Get 2lb of dry light malt extract, boil it with an ounce of hops for 30 minutes max in about a gal of water. Pour 3-4 gal of generic apple juice (preservative free ideally) into a carboy, pour the hot wort on top. When it's cooled down a bit, pour in a packet of ale yeast like US-05. Bottle it after 3-4 weeks on ...


5

I'm guessing this was actually an extract brew, so it's likely the wort was mostly fermentable. In the future you can use a hydrometer to measure how much sugars are left in your beer... then you can compare that number to an expected final gravity to make sure it really is time to bottle. If you've got an underattenuated beer sitting in the bottle, you ...


4

The best way to make sweet sparling cider is to force carbonate the cider using a kegging system. You will however need to employ some means of arresting the yeasts activity in order to either stop fermentation early or before you back sweeten. Instead of sulfites you can use potassium sorbate which will prevent the yeast from multiplying but you need to ...


4

Some options: Mash at a higher temperature, around 158 F. This will decrease the fermentability of the wort and make it fuller-bodied and sweeter. Add some carapils, maltodextrin, or carafoam. All of these increase head retention and body a bit. Treat your water to favor the flavors. A 2/1 Chloride/Sulfate ratio with 100+ ppm of Chloride will help, as will ...


3

It's certainly possible that the banana esters are due to warm fermentation temperature. After sanitation, I'd argue that the most important step in brewing is fermentation temperature. You want both the correct temperature for your yeast (each yeast varies so check the manufacturer), and a consistent temperature. The method you mentioned helps primarily ...


3

My understanding of "synonymous" is that it means "equivalent to". Therefore clearly no, "dry" is not equivalent to "low FG" which is not equivalent to "drinkable". However, they may well be related since low FG correlates with light body which can aid in drinkability. Similarly, if you like dry beer then you'll find it drinkable. And why exclude ...


3

In my own experience, "dry" and "low FG" are completely unrelated. This surprised me at first, but there are a lot of other factors besides FG that determine the 'dryness' of the beer. Right off the bat, the amount of hop bitterness counterbalances the sweetness. Likewise, any astringent character from the mineral qualities of the water will start chipping ...


3

The words may get frequently overloaded, but they actually all mean different things. I'll attempt to explain below. Dry(ness) -- Tends to refer to the amount of detectable sweetness in the final beverage. A beer that is hardly sweet would be considered dry. A dry beer could be correlated to Low FG, as little sugar would remain in the beer to taste. Low FG ...


2

The end of fermentation is not marked by the lack of activity in an airlock. Its determined by the arrival at terminal graivty. The rule of thumb is to check the gravity a few days consecutively until it doesn't change anymore. It could be too sweet because it wasn't actually done.


2

You have a few options. No matter what option you choose, you main goals are: To backsweeten To avoid bottle bombs! As per priming with honey vs priming sugar.. Honey has more flavor than sugar. However, if you are only adding enough to do the priming, then you will not increase the sweetness. Another popular ingredient to sweeten ciders is apple ...


2

Just going to throw this in a well. I agree perceived is hard to really calculate from person to person. It is simply that the more non-fermentable dextrines that are in your wort, the perceived bitterness will be lower. 80IBUs suddenly tastes like 20-30IBUs. Same goes for the other side, if the beer is dry and hoppy. 80IBUs may seem like 110IBUs. This ...


2

There is no calculation for sweetness. There are no sweetness units. Whenever I have seen this type of "grading" that you describe sweetness is just some sort of arbitrary lack of bitterness. But there is no reciprocal type calculation. Taking it a step further how do you calculate something that has the qualifier "perceived" in the title. Perceived ...


2

Would placing the fermenter tank in a tub of water be a good way to handle hot environments? I started brewing extracts a couple of months ago and I started to do the "swamp cooler" method which sounds similar to that which you have postulated. The only difference is that I never replace the water. I would recommend using a outer bucket filled with water ...


1

It's roughly 1 pound of honey to 1% abv in 5 gallons, 15lb will get you around 14% and 18lb about 17%. If looked after, WLP099 will consume all the sugars you have available at leave you with a very dry mead. 15% is no problem for that strain, and 18% is achievable with care. The sweet mead yeast WLP720 will stop around 14-15%, although actual performance ...


1

I agree with others; I think your fluctuating temperature is the likely cause. I have never tried the swamp method but I am about to convert a refrigerator into a fermentation chamber. I have a temperature control unit I picked up on ebay from someone in Hong Kong - the unit name escapes me at the moment. I am going to by-pass the thermostat on the fridge ...


1

This would depend on you having a kegging system, but if you force carb, you could take a page from the winemakers books and kill off the yeast through whatever means (a combination of potassium sorbate and potassium metabisulfite being suggested by JackSmith as the winemakers approach), and then back sweeten with your choice of sweetener (e.g. some malt ...


1

Xylitol is widely used as a sweetener for ciders, as it is an unfermentable sugar that will retain sweetness in your beverage and allow you to carbonate naturally using regular priming sugar. However, there are reports that drinking too much of the stuff can give you stomach problems. As always YMMV.


1

When I made my last batch of ginger beer, I used dark brown sugar as the priming sugar. It pairs well with the ginger and adds a little more "sweet" than simple white sugar. But Denny's right, you don't get much of a sweetening effect because of the relatively low amount. I've also used sucralose in the past to sweeten ciders without the danger of bottle ...


1

Here's how I do it. Brew dry still cider, mix it with fresh or frozen apple juice and some sugar so it's just a little sweeter than you'd like, add yeast (baker's will do fine here), mix thoroughly and decant into champagne bottles. Leave them in a warm place to carbonate for a couple of days, refrigerate and drink it as soon as possible. If you leave the ...


1

I had a similar problem and solved it by using sucralose (Splenda) to backsweeten. Yeast doesn't process it and it tastes just like sucrose at the same concentrations (saccharin can be bitter). BTW - the scare tactics used by the sugar lobby against sucralose are nonsense. As for pasteurizing, never had it effect my ciders (I do apple, pear, raspberry, ...


1

Brew the driest cider you can. Then back sweeten with simple syrup at the point of serving. I little squeegy bottle of simple syrup and you can mix it to taste. Your wife might like it sweeter or drier than you and you both have control over the process. You are kind of out of luck if you don't want to use the methods you described. However, any flavor ...


1

What is the fermentation temperature? (Not the ambient temperature in the room, but the temp in your fermenter. Fermentation generates heat and can add up to 10 degrees to your brew as it actively ferments--forgive me if you knew this already, but I just wanted to be clear.) If your fermentation temp is too high (above 70-74 degrees) you might be ...


1

The beer sounds still 'green' to me. The combo of cascade and only a few days into fermentation would most certainly still give you a sweet aroma. Without checking the gravity you don't know really where fermenation is at in its road to completion. But being only your 4th batch I'd sayits not done yet. Bubbling is never a good indicator of fermentation ...


1

I bet you added more dextrose or malt then the recipe called for and your beer stopped fermenting because it reached its max ABV for the yeast you used. certain yeasts die at a max AVB and to continue fermenting you must usedifferent yeast such a champagne yeast to obtain higher AVB...made that mistake myself early on and ended up with sweet malty beer that ...



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