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13

The caps are not perfectly smooth - they contain nucleation points, imperfections or dirt along the surface, where a bubble could form (similar to how boils are formed at nucleation points when heating water). As the cold water heats up, dissolved gasses are forced out of solution. Some of this gas dissipates, but some of it will attach to the nucleation ...


12

1) Can I just place my fermentation tank in this tub of water to counter the heat? Yes. This will work to a degree (ha, ha.) The water is slowly but constantly evaporating. The energy need to make liquid water into gas comes out of the water's temperature. This "evaporative cooling" will help cool your wort by a few degrees. 2) Will this method work during ...


10

This method is sometimes referred to as a "swamp cooler", and is well known and used in homebrewing circles. Honestly, if the brew shop employee told you it wouldn't work then they are either (a) trying to sell you a brewing fridge, or (b) not that educated on homebrewing. Change out some ice packs in the water twice a day and you get get down to the low ...


6

You may want to check out brewpi - it's a fermentation monitor, but isn't limited to just fermentation. The temperature devices used are DS18B20 temperature probes. You can get these pre-made in waterproof housing from sellers on ebay - the project also has a shop that sells them. The manufacturers claim they are accurate to +/- 0.5 C, although my tests ...


5

Cold water alone will not drop your temperatures eight degrees. You will need ice packs. A more readily available option is to go out and buy a case of water bottles from the store, freeze a couple of bottles, and just rotate them out every 6-8 hours by placing them in the water of the swamp cooler. Take an old cotton t-shirt and pull it over the top of ...


4

The aquarium heaters are not heating all of the water, but only the water around each heater. This will form convection currents around each heater - the heated water only moves upwards, and rises up to the surface, at the same time water at the surface cools and sinks. The convection currents are probably only a few inches around each heater, depending ...


3

I would suggest the iodine-based sanitizer knows as "Iodophor" if you really feel the need to sanitize the water: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodophor This stuff is an iodine-based sanitizer, fairly common in homebrewing (but probably not as common as Star San). I started out my homebrewing career with it, and still have some left. A big bottle goes a ...


2

The yeast will not necessarily drop out at 60F. I've used 1214 at that temp many times and I find it preferable to fermenting it at higher temps. In fact, I prefer fermenting pretty much any ale (and many lager) yeasts at or below the lower end of the temp range. You get cleaner beer with fewer esters and phenolics. I often ferment WY1007 and 1728 in the ...


2

You're measuring the temperature of the swamp cooler water and not the beer, and the beer will take a long time to reach the cooler water temperature, which will also rise in temp during the same period. This is because heat transfer between the beer and the cooling water is slow, since the surface area is small compared to the volume, plus both liquids are ...


2

While not the most elegant, you can go through the lid in a larger fermentor without a thermowell. I put this together without wanting to incur the cost of a thermowell - so I used some electrical tape, an extra hole opposite the airlock and a rubber grommet. I patiently and accurately wrapped the tape around the sensor wire, building it out so it fit nice ...


2

I'm actually in the exact same boat. Well.. Similar. Wasn't going to bother with the smartphone, but will have some form of communication. Here's what I have in mind I just ordered a USB Thermometer off Amazon that people have managed to get working in linux (specifically Ubuntu, but it sounds like it is agnostic to distros). From here I could whip up ...


1

I do winter ferments in a big plastic tub (called a "muck bucket") full of water. I put the fermenter in that and put a 65W aquarium heater in the water. If it's really cold, the heater runs 24/7. when it's not so cold, I out it on a timer to come on at the coldest parts of the day. With ambient temps in single digits, I can keep steady temps between ...


1

I think that it depends a lot on the yeast you're using, the beer you're using it in and where that beer is in its life-cycle (:D). If you made a particularly large starter of especially hearty yeast and it's at day 2.5 peak-Krausen, it will take a lot more abuse than a beer on it's third week in primary made with 5th generation yeast you underpitched. ...


1

Given that you're fermenting in buckets, then you need a straight-walled thermowell, like this: You put the thermowell through the lid of the bucket and down into the beer. The temperature probe slides inside the thermowell. The tricky part is to then make an airtight seal with the bucket lid. You can either buy a stopper with a hole, or a grommet. The ...


1

I'd personally use bleach for this--get some white fabric instead. One teaspoon per gallon is a good minimal concentration. Maybe try 2 tsp. Whatever you use, it will end up concentrating, as evaporation (like distillation) will leave behind everything but the water. Wash your fabric occasionally to remove this concentration (phosphates and organic ...


1

If you are into brewing (daa) and want to get your hands dirty(er) (into programming and electronics) you migth check "the electric imp" a relative simple and small datalogging device. It's well documented, user friendly, web avaliable and It also connects to your home wifi Here is a full instructable implementing a temperature web sensor. Total cost: ...



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