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Osmotic pressure does retard cell devision in most micro organisms making it hard to grow "in" a dense solution but they will have no problem growing "on" such a solution. High sugar content does little to inhibit growth of bacteria and yeast as long as it's still a solution and not a "gel". That being said, you can sour your juices you mentioned with lacto ...


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I always just boiled some sugar and water and dumped that straight into my bottling bucket and then siphoned the beer over it — since the tube is just hanging into the bucket at an angle it will swirl and mix the beer with your priming solution that you just boiled. Now you have an even amount of parking solution for each bottle and don't have to worry about ...


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I don't think you can mess up priming that easily as long as you don't massively over-prime. I think standard rule of thumb is 3/4 cup of corn sugar or 2/3 cup of cane sugar per 5 gallon batch. But those aren't perfect equivalents; if you use cane sugar, use about 90-95% of what you would use for corn sugar. Personally I tend to carbonate with closer to 2/3 ...


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Gratz on your first brew! When bottle conditioning you want to make sure you have an even mix of suspended yeast and priming sugar. Having a secondary vessel makes this easier usually a bottling bucket is preferred. Bottle conditioning is simply feeding the yeast a little more to get some fermentation in the bottle to produce carbonation. Carbonation drops ...


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I must admit , firstly I am not a scientist, in fact have little qualification. However I can attest to the following after many years of brewing both beer and spirits Plain sugar and dextrose add little to the flavour test Constant recommended fermented temperature is crucial to the consistant quality of your wort. When temperatures vary above and below ...



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