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19

AFAIK, there are no benefits. They're all basically the same. Brewing sugar is corn sugar and while there may be chemical differences between it and other types of sugar, the end result in your beer will be indistinguishable. Sugars like piloncillo or demarara can add a bit of flavor, but the result of adding corn, cane, beet, or brown sugar are pretty ...


13

About 80% of the sugars in the malt extract are fermentable, and about 20% are not. The main fermentables are maltose, maltriose, smaller amounts of sucrose, glucose and fructose. The remainder - about 20-25% are 20% unfermentable dextrins, the remaining 5% other less common sugars with variable fermentability by ale yeasts. Thus typical values are between ...


12

When calculating sugars used in the wort, how much sugar does honey contain? Is it closer to dry malt extracts, raw cane sugar, dextrose? Honey is loaded with fermentable sugar (think mead...), though not as much as malt extracts. There are "adjuncts" within the honey as well. But you can yet a near-even yield from honey as you could from dry ...


8

Wort (from 100% malt) is typically: 45% Maltose 20% Dextrose 15% Maltriose 10% Glucose/Fructose 5% Sucrose 5% other You can read more about adjuncts and their fermentability here.


7

You can absolutely open the bucket if you feel it's necessary to stir the must. There is very little chance of contamination if you are diligent in sanitizing everything that will touch the must. If any air borne particles do get in there won't be enough to get a foot hold and will be overtaken by the yeast. I have made over 20 meads that I have removed ...


7

Think of it this way. Sugar has a yield of 46 PPG (points per pound per gallon). Say you added 1 Cup of sugar to your batch. According to wikipedia, that is ~7oz of sugar. If this was a 5 gallon batch, your result is that you effectively added 46*(7/16)/5 = 4 points to the original gravity of your beer. Not much to make a huge difference. Give it a week to ...


7

Here is a link to an overview of sugars in beer I have brewed with multiple sugars before but never maple and I'm not certain what golden syrup is. Honey is a very common ingredient. In my uses it leaves a mild honey flavor but ferments out almost completely. I've used brown sugar and it adds a sweetness but I personally feel the raw demerara sugar leaves a ...


6

If you are using light brown sugar, for all intents and purposes they are the same. They should both ferment to 100%. Dark brown sugar has more molasses in it and there are some unfermentable sugars in molasses. That being said, its such a small percentage that I simply wouldn't worry about it. Were are talking fractions of a percent loss of ABV. So, ...


6

I can only answer the first part of your question. The sugars in honey vary depending on the type. If you really want to know the contributions you should make a measurement. Specific gravity is a measure of points per pound per gallon (ppg). All you need do is take a pound of honey, add pure water until you have a gallon and measure with a hydrometer. ...


6

I agree with Denny, except that I can taste brown sugar, especially when used for priming. It is very subtle and mostly an aroma, but tastes slightly different from cane/beet/corn sugar. Same is true of honey; it mostly ferments out but leaves a subtle residual flavor. I like to use brown sugar on bottle or keg conditioned stouts (oatmeal, milk) and I like ...


6

2 cups of sugar weighs around 440g, so let's call that 1 pound. Sugar provides 46 points of gravity, per pound, per gallon. 1 pound of sugar in 2 litres (~ 0.5 gallon) would contribute 92 points of gravity. Apple juice is typically around 1.060. Adding the 92 points from the sugar addition yields an estimated starting gravity of 1.152. To get the 1.21 ...


6

Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


5

I usually add water to the sugar (a pint per pound or so) and boil it for 10 minutes and then chill it to around current fermentation temperature before adding it to the fermenting beer. Sanitize everything really well, pull the plug from the mouth of the carboy, drop a funnel into it and pour. There's no need to shake it up or anything, because the ...


5

Invert sugar or belgian candi sugar is fructose and glucose, both monosaccharides. Table sugar is sucrose, a disaccharide, composed of one fructose and one glucose molecule. Yeast can really easily consume monosaccharides like fructose and glucose, but they have to split apart sucrose first to digest it. This added step can introduce off flavors and stress ...


5

You could try this, if you have an accurate scale: Dilute the syrup to a 10% solution, by weight. For example, 90 grams of water and 10 grams of invert sugar. Mix it very well, and measure the gravity with your hydrometer. The Brix/Plato scale on the hydrometer is the most useful here, as it shows percent sugar, as sucrose. You can use this reading to ...


5

Adding pure sugar to any beer style does a few things. First, it increases the ABV. This is only an issue if it gets you an alcohol % that is noticeable in the flavor profile of the beer. Brown Ale certainly has no tolerance for any kind of warm alcohol flavor (unlike Barleywines, or big Belgians), so make sure your ABV doesn't go up past 7-8%. Second, it ...


4

For fruit, get a refractometer. $50 or so online at williamsbrewing.com or other beer/wine shops. Mash up a handful of the fruit 'til it's juice and then dribble the juice on the refractometer lens. That will give you a brix reading. There's probably some formal math you can use to get exact numbers here, but here's some basic info: 24 brix when ...


4

To get residual sweetness without knocking out the yeast, you add non-fermentable sugars to the wort. To add sweetness and some body in an extract brew, lactose is the usual adjunct: 1/8 to 3/8 pound in a 5 gallon batch gives a noticable sweetness. As lactose is non-fermentable, it can be used to adjust the sweetness either by adding to the boil, or at ...


4

Go ahead and use table sugar -- it'll work fine to carbonate your beer. However, 250g seems high to me. This online calculator suggests that 4.6 oz, 130 grams is the right amount, assuming 12 oz bottles. Your main concerns when adding the priming sugar are sanitation and proper dilution/distribution. If you don't ensure that the priming sugar is properly ...


4

I wouldn't have even cared on looking the best before date and would have just used it, but your question is intriguing! I found an article claiming that most sugars don't actually go bad. Dry Malt Extract and Liquid Malt Extract on the other hand are better used fresh from what I have been reading. Not sure exactly what goes bad there though (perhaps ...


4

I'd be surprised if 1.008 tasted excessively sweet - that's not very much "regular" sugar, so it does sound like some kind of artificial sweetener. Acesulfame K won't show up on the hydrometer, since it is 200 times sweeter than sucrose for the same mass, so very little is needed. It does have a slightly bitter aftertaste, so I think you'll notice it. See ...


4

Priming sugar amount depends on carbonation level, that is Total carbonation = CO2 already in beer + CO2 from priming sugar CO2 already in beer depends on the temperature you bottle at CO2 from priming sugar is proportional to amount of sugar used Total carbonation is expressed in volumes (Vol) and depends on beer style. You can find all this taken ...


4

The short answer is Yes, I think you're fine. I'm assuming that by "brewer's sugar" you mean Corn Sugar, which is the most common type of sugar used in brewing, usually used as priming sugar (for carbonation). After reading your post a few times, I'm thinking what she gave you actually IS corn sugar. See this excerpt from this article: "Corn sugar/syrup: ...


4

You can use a beer priming-sugar calculator to determine the correct amount. For 2L of beer, which probably already has ~2 volumes of CO₂, you probably only need 3-5g of table sugar and just a sprinkle of yeast, and then you're mostly just going to presurize the vessel instead of really carbonating the beer itself. If you let the beer go flat, first, assume ...


3

I would let it sit for now. Sugar tends to dissolve eventually and yeast are crafty, so they will find the sugar at the bottom and eat it, regardless of whether it has dissolved, although your initial gravity readings may have been off if the sugar was not dissolved when you took them. You want to be really careful right now to avoid infection since there ...


3

As you've seen, even though the wort comprises 100% fermentable sugars, ale yeast does not in fact ferment all of it. As the yeast ferment the sugar, the environment becomes more and more harsh, preventing the yeast from consuming the remaining fermentables. Also, ale yeast can only ferment 1/3 of the maltriose. If you perform a forced ferment - lots of ...


3

The attenuation rating of yeast is simply a way of comparing one yeast to another given a standard wort or must. It does not necessarily reflect the attenuation you can expect from the yeast. That is far more dependent on the sugar composition of whatever the yeast is fermenting.


3

This page has a good rundown of Candi Sugar and how to make your own. Essentially it a mixture of fructose, glucose, and citric acid where as table sugar is sucrose.


3

There are certain varietal honeys that can add a significant amount of flavor and aroma to a beer. Buckwheat honey in particular has a very strong flavor and aroma even after fermentation. There are certain wildflower and clover honeys that will also stand out. If you would like more honey character to come through you need to choose a varietal that is ...


3

In the quantities that honey is typically used, changing the variety of honey will have a slight effect on flavor and aroma, but little else. Strained honey or raw honey might add a slight haze from pollen, but honeycomb, wax, and anything else should settle out during primary or secondary. Ultrafiltered honey should have no effect on clarity. ...



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