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7

Relax. It sounds like fermentation is proceeding normally. The 3-inch scum ring is the krausen and is a sign of a healthy fermentation - a foam head wouldn't last 3 days. Your airlock is probably not air-tight so you don't see any activity. It's quite common - I've had this on a couple of brews. Take a hydrometer reading in a couple of days, and you should ...


5

Pitching yeast directly into wort is not a good idea - it reduces the viability by at least half for normal strength wort, and presumably even more for higher gravity or higher alcohol worts. You have a lot of yeast in this brew, presumably dead or dying, so I would consider racking soon to avoid picking up a yeast bite in the beer. A schedule like this ...


5

Well 1010 is likely not attainable as that would be around 80% attenuation. You are currently at ~66% attenuation. If you've roused the yeast I'd give it until at least 14 days, but a 1070 OG to me would warrant 21 days. I am a patient brewer however. The bucket is full of CO2 so gently swirl away until you think the yeast is sufficiently roused. Give ...


5

Measure the gravities of the brews. Since you said you've got them in buckets, I'm going to assume you haven't looked inside them to see if you had krausen or anything like that on top. With the buckets, it's entirely possible you didn't have a perfect seal on one of the buckets, so the CO2 escaped out somewhere besides the airlock. I know my first batch ...


4

A few things on fermentation.... Airlock activity is not an indication of fermentation. Just because you don't see bubbles and a hear a gurgling airlock does not mean that your wine is not fermenting. To take readings you need a hydrometer. A hydrometer measures a liquids gravity (or density). Liquid is more dense with sugar, and less with out. As yeast ...


4

It's hard to know when the yeast has hit high krausen, since the constant stirring prevents a krausen from forming, but with a starter, in many ways, you don't really need to know.... The idea behind pitching at high krausen is to pitch actively fermenting yeast. With good yeast stock, after about 18-24h your starter will be actively fermenting, and will ...


4

The cake is referring the yeast the was produced from a previous batch of beer. Yeast reproduces as it ferments the beer. The layer on the bottom of the fermenter is the yeast that grew during fermentation. Some people will brew a batch of beer and pitch it directly onto the cake created from a previous brew. The preferred method would be to wash the yeast ...


4

You need to determine if you have a wort problem or a yeast problem. The way to do that is with a fast ferment test (sometimes called forced ferment test). Put some of the wort in a small sanitized container. You need enough to be able to take a gravity reading. Add a LOT of yeast to the sample...even bread yeast is fine for this since we want to know if ...


3

It sounds like you severely under-pitched. That OG sounds a little low too--it's about what I would expect from 10-12 lbs of honey in 5 gallons, but maybe that brand of honey is a little more watery than most. I've never used that strain of yeast (I'm a Lalvin guy) but if it is a wine yeast (as is likely) you are probably stuck with it. I would order ...


3

Lots of people cool their wort overnight, so that should be ok as long as it was in a sanitized container and was covered. Did you take a gravity reading of the cooled wort? If so, you should check the gravity now to confirm that it's not fermenting. Pitching more yeast sounds like a good plan if there really is no fermentation. But I'd use a dry yeast at ...


3

The gravity reading pretty much indicates fermentation was done. Shaking the bucket just knocked the CO2 out of solution, like shaking up a can of soda. The crud you were trying to get back into the "beverage" is called krausen. Its mostly yeast and other proteins from the malt. Not knowing your recipe I don't know if you used hops or not as part of the ...


3

My suggestion would be to get some known good yeast in there quickly, preferably of the same type as you pitched, but at this point, it sounds like whatever yeast is in there is dead and will just settle out anyway. Though FAR from an expert on yeast, I'm not aware of any yeast that would give you no bubbles at all in the air lock at 36 hours. My concern ...


3

One month past best before isn't all that bad. The first thing to do is take a gravity reading so you can be absolutely sure what's going on. If it's still the same gravity as when you pitched, I'd go with #1 for another day. 36 hours isn't an excessively long lag. But by 18-24 hours after that, I'd get some dry yeast in there ASAP if you haven't seen any ...


3

Before you do any repitching, you must get the temp up first. Otherwise the new yeast will just settle out with temperature shock too. That strain is a high flocculator, so if the temp is to low it certainly drops out early. Get the temp up to 72F and try the following ideas. Then I'd rouse the yeast you have a bit and see if it will come revive and be ...


3

Not all fermenting buckets are air-tight, which means that occationaly you'll have a bucket where the airlock on top does not bubble properly. This by itself is not a problem. Also, your mistake with the corn sugar won't really hurt you, and it is not the reason you have no bubbles. What you need to do now is take off the lid of the bucket and see if you've ...


3

I generally wait a few days before worrying at all. I have had slow fermentations, where I didn't see any activity in the airlock, but when I took a hydrometer reading after about 10 days, fermentation was complete, so definitely don't assume you have problems simply because you don't see any airlock activity. Most importantly, make sure your wort is in ...


3

I'd leave it overnight and give it more chance to work. Just because there is no activity in the airlock does not mean it's not fermenting


3

This is quite normal. At the end of fermentation, there isn't much CO2 production - the yeast are conditioning the beer. Also, as the temperature falls, the pressure of the gas in the carboy decreases, which causes more air to enter from outside to equalize the pressure. Regarding the increase in gravity, 1 point is well within the error tolerance, and ...


3

You moved the cider to secondary too soon. Normally you want at least 65% attenuation to have been reached. Since apple juice ferments to nearly 1.000, that would be 1.030. Apple juice is low in nutrients, which the yeast require to metabolize sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide. I would suggest you move the cider back into the fermentor and add fresh ...


3

To fix this beer, I would raise the temperature to 55F and leave it for another couple of weeks. Assuming sanitation is good the beer will be ok. 1.7l is on the small side even for a stirred starter for a 1.060 lager, and airation doesn't provide the dissolved oxygen levels needed. (ca. 15ppm.) In future, aim for a 4-5l starter and yeast nutrient. If you ...


2

You may need to be very patient. My Dad used to give sloe wine a year to ferment, the results were worth it. If you want quick results from sloes, gin is the way to go. Having said that, I leave my sloe gin a year before bottling/drinking.


2

Slow is good (no pun intended), and anecdotally at any rate, I believe it leads to a more thorough fermentation and usually a dryer wine. As long as it's fermenting, no matter how slowly, it's doing the right thing. Some fermentations are over in days, others take weeks, and some months! Be patient!


2

I took the Red Green approach to keeping a carboy warm when I was brewing last winter and had temperatures in my brewing area that were too low (perhaps not for lagering, but certainly for what I was doing). I took a large corrugated cardboard box (I used the one my 21 gal. air compressor came in) and placed it over the carboy. I cut a hole at the bottom ...


2

Not sure what yeast you used but assuming it was a Belgian strain which are more tolerant to higher alcohol levels, then I would certainly look at pitching rate like the last answer said. If the yeast was pitched right out of the fridge (cold) you might have shocked the yeast, or if the yeast got to hot before pitched same problem unhealthy yeast pretty much ...


2

Adding water will lower your gravity through dilution. It will also dilute out all your other attributes (flavor, alcohol, mouthfeel, color etc etc). Being stuck at 1.058 seems too high to be simply off due to water dilution (unless you forgot to add several gallons to a concentrated boil). Being stuck at 1.058 is likely a fermentation/yeast management ...


2

Yes, this is perfectly normal. Given your gravity is 1.003, I'm not sure if fermentation actually started, or you just caused some of the CO2 to come out of solution - in both cases you'll get bubbles in the airlock. Ah, 4 days you say, that's quite a long time. It could be that you got "stratification" - bands of higher concentrated sugars at the bottom. ...


2

Clarification will not remove dissolved sugars. It's the same reason why in order to remove the proteins that cause chill haze, you have to chill the beer first to get the proteins to precipitate out of solution into solids. When the sugar dissolves, it interacts with the water on a molecular level, producing no overall charge. Yet, all finings work by ...


2

Like so many things in beer, a multitude of factors could be at work. Is this an all-grain or partial mash? It's possible that you ended up with a lot of unfermentable sugars and the yeast are just done. More yeast will have nothing to eat. In which case your beer is just done. 7.35% ABV and ~63% apparent attenuation. Not terrible. If the yeast has ...


2

One smack pack, no starter = underpitched. 1.010 is also unrealistic, you're looking for about 85% attenuation from a yeast that does 70-76% per Wyeast (assuming Bavarian Wheat 3638). I figure you are under 65% now, so there is room for improvement. I'd give it a lot more time and consider bumping up the temperature to close to 75 degrees. Continue to ...


2

That yeast needs a lot of O2 at pitching and rousing during fermentation. Add to that the fact that it's only been 5 days. Baby it along for another 2 weeks. It could also be dependent on your recipe.



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