Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Cleaning is the process of removing material from the surface. Sanitizing is the process of reducing the number of organisms (in brewing, we're worried about bad bacteria, mainly - but others also like fungi and unwanted yeast). Sterilizing is like sanitizing, but removing ALL microorganisms (any living being - microscopic). If I remember right, ...


8

The risk of infection is much lower after primary fermentation is complete, since there is alcohol present. The alcohol will prevent or retard the growth of bacteria and rogue yeasts. So, you should be safe to just add your adjuncts. With some fruits (strawberries especially), I have noticed that the beer seems to spoil after a month or so, presumably ...


7

I think the factor isn't that you want sterile wort, but sanitized wort. You may not get sterile wort from boiling, but that isn't a problem. The wort is surrounded by barely sanitary air, so it's going to be contaminated to some degree from the get go. The key point is that the massive yeast population (>100bn cells for a 5 gallon batch) scavenge dissolved ...


6

Don't worry about sterilizing the hops. If you practice good sanitation you shouldn't get an infection. I've dry hopped several beers with pellet hops strait out of the pouch and have never had an infection as a result. A lot of new brewers worry about contaminating their beers. The truth is it is pretty hard to get a contamination, you almost have to try ...


5

The fermented beer is resilient to infections because it has several percent of alcohol inhibiting the bacterias from reproducing. Don't sweat it, you'll be fine. I never had any problems with dry hopping. I even put fresh fruit and peppers (unboiled) and it was still fine.


5

You're right - you need minerals! Different minerals in the brewing water perform a number of roles througout the brewing process: mashing: during the mash, minerals are used to adjust the pH - around 5.2 is considered a comprimise between the pH ranges favored by alpha and beta amylase. Chalk (Calcium Carbonate) and Baking soda (Calcium Hydrogen ...


4

Not only is there alcohol that will stave off some of the nasties like other responses have mentioned. But hops themselves have antibiotic properties which help your yeast get an edge over the bugs. As far as fruit type adjuncts, if you want to play it safe, you don't actually have to boil them. Just put them in a pot and raise them to 160F for ten ...


4

Since you intend to build your water from scratch, I recommend you take a look at Martin Brungard's excellent (and free!) water spreadsheet at https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/ . Not only will it help you to figure out what minerals you need for each beer style, there's a great water tutorial section in it.


4

Just add 1/4 tsp or 1g of what you have. Irish moss is a fining - it helps draw together proteins in the boil, and is primarily added to improve clarity, but it can also provide a finer head. It's not critical how much you use - some brewers use 1/4 tsp per 5 gallons, others 1 tsp. The moss doesn't have to be sterile - anything added to the boil is quickly ...


3

10 min boil extra 1/2 cups water, what you may lose during that time. DME/Prime Sugar. Why risk losing your beer over saving few minutes.


2

The minerals that we care about are: calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, sodium and chloride. Different styles want different quantities. You can adjust your distilled water to a particular mineral profile by adding various salts. You're best to read Chapter 15 of How To Brew by John Palmer. On older version is online here: ...


2

I use the fermentation bucket for bottle sanitizing. I agree with Chino Brews in recommending the use of a no-rinse sanitizer. I've been using BTF Iodophor. It only requires a two minute contact and no rinsing (rinsing is prohibited, actually). I've been brewing for about 9 months (not long, I know) and I'm working on my 7th beer now and I have had good ...


2

There is not a lot of information on Bruclens on the Internet, but it seems like it is packaged and sold by Wilkos in the UK, and its active ingredients include sodium percarbonate (the same active ingredient in OxyClean Free, which is a cleanser), and 7% chlorine (which is the sanitizer). If I just made the sterilizer came in to contact with all of the ...


2

I'm assuming you have a bottling bucket? Can't you just fill the sterilizer directly into the bottles? Then leave them for 10 mins before emptying and putting the same sterilizer into the next batch of bottles.


1

There is a new product on the web (you can for sure get it on Amazon.com) called SafeTASTE. It is a concentrated product that adds the tasty minerals back to distilled or reverse osmosis water - only a few drops are need in each cup of water. 1 mL will flavor an entire liter. It has the same minerals, in the same forms and the same concentrations relative ...


1

The technical definitions are as follows: A sanitizing agent removes 99.999% of organisms a sterilization process removes 99.99999999% of organisms. Seems like a small difference but I'd rather have that extra 0.00099999% if they are going to perform surgery or something. Also In the United States, items labeled as sanitizers are agents that destroy ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible