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8

You may notice your malt extract say something like "non-diastatic, unhopped, pure malt extract", or something similar. Diastatic power is the ability of a malt to convert starch to sugar. In an extract, you don't need it because it's already been converted for you. However, to get starch to turn into fermentable sugar, a diastatic malt is required. The ...


4

I don't know if there's a "proper" way to do it, but I've always used a grain bag with good results up until my most recent batch. Time and temperature vary based on the grains being used and desired flavor profile, among other variables. For my most recent batch I steeped 2 pounds of specialty grains in 3 quarts of water in a separate pot, drained this ...


4

Firstly, I think your conversion to extract is off. You'll need 8.25 lbs of dry or 9.8 lbs of liquid. (See below) You can get amber, wheat and Munich malt extracts. This leaves you with 3.75 lbs of steeping grains - a much more manageable amount. Some wheat malts are a half-and-half mix of wheat and 2-row malts, so be sure to adjust your amounts ...


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The problem in my opinion is the heavy usage of Roasted Barley with the use of dark DME. The dark DME has roasted malts in it already. While it is typical for a Dry stout to use up to 1# of Roasted Barley, in this recipe you've added more than that because the DME brought some to the party. When using colored malts, I tend to go easy on the specialty ...


4

Some specialty grains (e.g. dextrin/cara-pils) need to be mashed. These need to be mashed, because they require a chemical reaction to take place to be useful. Some (e.g. crystal) need only to be steeped, but can also be put in the mash. These do not need a chemical reaction to take place to be useful, they just need to have the chemicals in them extracted ...


4

You may get some oxidation of the "specialty" wort letting it sit like that. You aren't really saving any time though. Start your steep in cold water while you heat it up. By the time its at 160F you are generally good to pull the grains out and keep on heating to boiling. I know most instructions when I started extract and grain brewing says to steep in ...


4

Both will work, in the sense that you will get beer at the end, but they will have different results. The 160F steep for a few minutes will not extract much sugars from the base malt, and those that are extracted will be dextrins, non-fermentable sugars that give body, and also starches which will give the beer a haze. Combined with the use of extract ...


3

You're right that flaked barley normally has to be mashed to extract the potential yield. However, the main contribution of the flaked barley isn't so much the sugar potential, but beta glucans and proteins. The beta glucans contribute to the thicker mouthfeel, and the proteins to the foam (head). While you may get a little starch in the beer from steeping ...


3

If it's the head retention qualities of the flaked barley you are after, you could add 200g/0.45lb of carapils per 19l/5 gal. It will add head retention, and hardly adds any color, and such a small amount will not affect mouthfeel. I usually brew my stouts with an Irish liquid yeast, but I've also used US-05 and then they come out really dry! If you use ...


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


3

I used to do this. Can't say that it really hurt or helped. I eventually started to just put the bag in an empty pot and started my boil in the main pot. Then I'd add whatever came out of the bag into the boil later when I got around to it after the boil had gotten started. And unless there is base malt in the bag with your specialty grains its not a mash ...


3

I made an oatmeal porter which came out really, really nicely. The mouthfeel was smooth and silky but not overdone. The only downside was that it had next to zero head retention. To get the "smooth" palate, you need to mash the oatmeal with your grains, but you really do not want to overdo the oats. I used 100g oats in a 15l batch (about 1/3 pound of oats ...


3

So, from a different perspective, steeping grains is just the same thing as mashing, you're just using a bag to remove the grains rather than draining the water from the grain bed. I'm also not sure that there is a "proper" way, but just like a mash the temperature and amount of water you have mixed in with your grain makes a significant difference in what ...


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So I thought I'd toss in my ideas... First, the recipe, for those who didn't want to Google it: 6.00 lb Dark Dry Extract   (17.5 SRM)        Dry Extract      85.71 % 1.00 lb Roasted Barley     (300.0 SRM)      Grain              14.29 % 2.00 oz Ultra Hops           [4.20 %]          (45 min)         22.1 IBU 3.00 tbsp Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) (Boil 45.0 ...


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Cold steeping is supposed to give you a smoother taste from dark and specialty grains that can impart ashy, acrid flavors when steeped in hot water. Cold steeping means actually steeping your grain at room temperature (not in ice water), and steeping it for 6-12 hours. The process is very similar to cold steeping coffee (and it's also done for similar ...


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Short Answer Steeping CaraPils is fine. The Reasoning One of the goals of mashing is conversion, which breaks down starches present in grain to sugars that yeast can eat. Some malts are converted in the malting process making it unnecessary to mash for conversion. The HomebrewTalk wiki lists "mash req'd" column on their malts chart indicating which malts ...


3

Keep it proportional. I haven't discovered a perfect ratio for pounds of steeping grains to steeping water volume, but I have learned to be wary of using more than a few pounds in just a couple gallon steep. Previously, I used a grain bag with 2-5 lbs of specialty grains, depending on the recipe, in a 8 qt steep. Recently, though, I've started adding the ...


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(Yes, it's semantics: the words have different meanings. :) Mashing is the enzymatic conversion of starch to sugar, using alpha- and beta-amylaze naturally present in grain at the specific temperatures to activate them (~150°F). Steeping is using hot water to extract flavor and color compounds from grain.


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In addition, you should steep grains in about the same amount of water you'd use if you were mashing them in order to avoid too high a pH and the risk of tannin extraction. Grains will naturally reduce the pH of the water, but if you use too much water there won't be enough grain to get the pH down into the proper range. Stay in the 1.5-2 qt./lb. range to ...


2

For truly steeping some specialty grains for flavor and color 30 minutes is generally a good rule of thumb, independent of weight. But you need to ensure good water to grain contact. So putting the 5lbs in 2 or 3 grain bags with plenty of room for expansion is the key here. But if you are infact using some base malts then you are mashing and not ...


2

the time to steep grain is typically not determined by weight. if the volume of grain being steeped is too large to be efficient, break it up into smaller amounts and steep them seperately. for my system 'too much' is about 5lbs or anything that increases the volume in my pot by 1/4. typically 20-30 minutes is fine for steeping grain as a part of a partial ...


2

So I think the converted recipe would look like this. I ended up getting the ppg's from a bunch of different places, so I'm not positive they are right. Anyone see any problems? Amber: 1.5 * 32 * .7 / 37 = .91 Wheat: .5 * 38 *.7 / 37 = .36 Munich: 2 * 32 * .7 / 37 = 1.2 Pale: 14 * 37 * .7 / 37 = 9.8 Recipe Estimated Stats (at 70% brewhouse efficiency) ...


2

In general, yes. In this month's issue of BYO (Vol. 16 No. 2) Bob Hansen, Manager of Technical Services at Briess Malt, warns: "... some American malt marketed as caramel, or crystal, malts are actually produced on a kiln and are only partially converted. These can be identified by cracking the kernels. If mealy starch is discovered in many of the ...


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When you steep your grains the main goal is to extract mainly color and flavor from the grain, a bonus of the process is you will get some starch conversion to sugar. In order to extract the color and flavor the grain does need to be crushed in the same manor as an all grain mash. I believe that due to the relatively small amount of specialty grains ...


2

With the 'tea' being added to your 60 minute boil, and as long as you follow good sanitation procedures, I don't see any major problems that you would run into. But, you can much more easily just steep your grains in your brew pot while bringing your water up to a boil. This won't add time to your brew day, and will save you time having to deal with ...


2

There's no upper limit in terms of how much speciality malt you can actually use and still extract sugar - the limit is more to do with taste. To my mind, in an extract brew, 20% is the maximum amount of caramel/crystal malt that I would use in a recipe, simply because of the amount of residual sweetness left, which is on top of the sweetness left by the ...


2

The end result is the same, but mashing implies that enzymes are converting starches into sugars. These enzymes work when held around 150°F. The two enzymes are alpha and beta amylase. Alpha works more at higher temperatures (optimal at 158°F) and cuts starches randomly into long chain sugars (only some of which are fermentable). Beta works at lower ...


2

As far as I understand, the hop utilization is affected by the specific gravity of the wort. E.g, the Daniels formula for calculating IBUs takes the boil gravity into account. My only source is this ppt :) Steeping grains does not substantially increase the gravity and should thus not affect hop utilization. According to Daniels, brewing with a boil ...


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You can go both ways on this. You can let it slowly drip out, or you can squeeze (definitely with gloves) as long as a few extra precautions are taken. I would recommend setting a sieve/fine-mesh strainer over your boil kettle to catch any protein matter that comes out of the bag when you squeeze, and be aware that if the pH of your water while doing the ...


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It's not clear which malt you mean - there no "Aroma" malt from Weyermann. It could be either CaraAroma or Aromatic malt. CaraAroma This you can steep with no concerns about the starches. CaraAroma is a crystal malt, which has had all the starches pre-converted to simpler sugars by the maltster. Steeping at 160°F is fine for this malt. Aromatic Malt ...



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