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12

You need the starter medium to contain maltose and other nutrients provided by malt, or the yeast that you grow will be poorly suited and/or lose the ability to ferment the maltose in a proper wort. This is especially true when brewing a high-gravity beer.


11

Your starter size will vary with the cell count you are shooting for, which in turn will be determined by the original gravity of the wort, batch size, and whether it is an ale or a lager. Use Jamil Zainasheff's pitching rate calculator to determine how much yeast to pitch. As an easy to remember rule of thumb, use 10 grams of dry malt extract for every ...


6

Wyeast packages need overnight at least to swell in my experience. Even the freshest packages take about 8 hours. Some part of the 4 hours was spent just getting completely up to room temp. Next time you plan to brew with one, take it out the morning of or the night before you plan to brew. Then it can swell all day or overnight for your night/morning ...


6

You can make good beer by using yeast directly out of whatever packaging style your favorite yeast comes in. You can always pitch more by buying more too. However, IMO, better beer and great beer is made when using a starter. Its a function of viability and vitality of yeast. Pitching more packs increases the # of viable cells you pitch. However, a ...


5

The goal is to pitch an adequate number of viable yeast cells in order to get a good fermentation. Whether you do that with a starter you built yourself or by buying more yeast does not matter. A useful tool is Jamil "Mr Malty" Zainasheff's pitching rate calculator. In the long run it's cheaper to buy yourself a 5 liter erlenmeyer flask and learn how to ...


5

In short, yes it does oxidize, but it's not usually a problem for your beer, since it's heavily diluted. With no airlock (to allow gas transfer) and constant stirring, oxidization is inevitable once the yeast have come out of the lag phase and start fermenting. During the lag phase, most of the oxygen is taken up by the yeast as part of propagation, but ...


4

Re-hydrating is definitely worth doing. Usually there are better directions on the package or at the manufacturers website. The process you described though is a good rule of thumb and its what I do. I do it without sugar, and I feel that's sort of a bad idea. Just use water. The foaming the some people describe is not any type of yeast activity its ...


4

The starter may well have finished in the 18 or so hours you gave it, or it could be stuck. The way to find out is to take a gravity reading and see if it's close to your expected FG. EDIT: A gravity reading of 1.015 from 1.090 is 84% attenuation, which is good. I'd say you're done or close to done. There may be some small amount of sugars remaining, but ...


4

That sounds like a plan. When the starter is cool the yeast will sediment quicker so you can pour off the spent wort easier. Definitely take yeast out of the fridge on brewday, let it warm. If you have some additional sterile wort, then you can decant the spent wort and pitch the fresh wort as soon as the yeast has come up to room temp. Otherwise, if you ...


3

Turns out that, at least in my case, freezing the dry yeast is actually a bad idea. I made an experiment last night and I put two sachets of ICV D-47 in the freezer and two sachets in the fridge. This morning I took both of them out and let them warm up in the room. I used the same activating mixture I've always used (some must + some nutrients) and split ...


3

It's certainly possible - a starter is only fermented to completion, but not conditioned, so byproducts of fermentation, such as acetaldehyde (green apple) and acetolactate (which becomes diacetyl - butter/butterscotch) are still left in the beer. This have low taste thresholds (50ppb for diacetyl), so it doesn't take much for you to notice then. In a ...


3

Using a stir plate does oxidize starer wort very much, but as long as you decant most of the starter wort, there isn't enough left to have much, if any, flavor impact on your beer.


3

It could the the hops - some hops e.g. bramling cross have a clear blackcurrant aroma, or the use of a dark crystal, which can bring several different aromas, such as toasted biscuit, prunes, raisin and blackcurrant. When sugar solutions are frozen to make frozen deserts, crystals can spontaneously form. This could have happened in the wort, pulling out ...


3

The answer is not quite a "yes" or a "no". The smack pack contains a yeast nutrient that actually transforms the pack in a starter. You should let the pack swell before you use it, because that's the sign that the yeast has metabolised the nutrients, and, air being absent, has used the energy to grow in cell number. This takes about 24 hours. A Wyeast ...


3

Making a starter is generally a good idea It doesn't really matter when you add the contents It's the same process going on in the pack as in the starter. The smack pack contains some sugars and a little yeast nutrient, making it essentially a starter on it's own. It will get you to about the half number of cells needed for a 5 gallon batch.


3

What temp guidlines apply to doing a yeast starter? Yeast Starters are used to boost the starting population of yeast before pitching it into the wort. This is best accomplished by creating an ideal environment for the yeast to bud, rather than simulating the wort into which you will pitch. Keep the starting wort gravity around 1.040, don't add hops, ...


2

I've brewed two 5 gallon batches of Lager, both times with dry lager yeast and both times without starters (the dry yeast package instructions said to sprinkle it into the wort, so that's what I did). The first one turned out really well and the second one is currently bubbling merrily in my 40 degree basement. I don't have any experience with liquid ...


2

No, there will be no negative affects from the yeast fermenting the malt. On the positive side, malt provides more nutrients than honey, aiding yeast growth. Just be sure to wait for the yeast to fully sediment so you can decant all of the malt before pitching the yeast, unless of course you're making a braggot.


2

The yeast want to multiply, that's their preferred activity. Given an optimal environment, the yeast will continue to propagate. The same is true for other microorganisms, like bacteria - given ideal conditions they would have taken over the world countless times over. The key is sufficient resources and ideal conditions - something that is rare or ...


2

This question is brought on by bad information of another post. The 'Crabtree effect' essentially states that yeast in high sugar will choose to undergo fermentation rather than aerobic respiration (using O2 to respire). However, this does not mean that they aren't using O2. On the contrary the yeast are actively dividing and use the O2 to make sterols ...


2

There's a strong likelihood that the "wild yeast" that started fermenting your wort is residual yeast in the carboy (or other equipment) from your last batch. Something wasn't properly cleaned and sanitized, and the microorganism in highest abundance is generally your last yeast, so that's what has the best odds of survival. If this is the case, though, ...


2

I think either way will work. What you want is the yeast to settle, and both methods you describe will do that. If you use the second one, the only difference is that maybe the yeast will have more nutrients when it "wakes up". Just make sure you don't make too much yeast because that is equally bad as less than required.


2

The "scientific" way would be to use a microscope and hemacytometer to count cells. The empirical method is what I use and has worked well for me for several hundred batches. You make a guess! I use between 1/3-1/2 of a previous slurry if I'm going to direct pitch the slurry. I use between 2 TBSP. -1/4 cup if I'm going to make a new starter from slurry.


1

There are two main types of pressure barrels, which are broadly described as top tap or bottom tap, depending where the tap is on the barrel. If the tap is at the top of the barrel then pressure is required inside the keg to push the beer up a tube and out of the tap. In the case of bottom taps, there is no need for pressure to dispense beer, but if there ...


1

Most ale yeast can survive some fairly warm temperatures. In some of the upper ranges, yeast will tend to produce more non-alcohol by-products than you probably want in a beer but it will still be alive and well. I would say that as long as both the starter and the beer you pitched it into are less than about 100°F and you brought the wort down to a more ...


1

It looks like the yeast are still in suspension to some degree after the 30 min rest indicating they are still alive and you should be ok. As an extra check, take a gravity reading once the yeast have fully settled. If it's close to your expected FG then that confirms the yeast were active. You could also taste the gravity sample. Starters often taste ...


1

Servomyces is simply dead yeast. Prior to being killed, it was fed micronutrients which have been stored in the yeast. There's no harm pitching more into your starter, assuming you then later pitch to 5 gallons or more. If your starter yeast don't use all the nutrients, your main brew certainly will, so there's no harm pitching the entire capsule. The White ...


1

I had precisely the same problem with this yeast. It had, after 48 hours, begun to activate in the main brew, and I've read in lots of places it can be a slow yeast to get going. It also apparently needs lots of oxygen to grow well, so maybe the sealed smack packs just don't favour it.


1

You're probably fine Decant off most of the liquid. Taste it. Swirl up the slurry. Taste it. Be sanitary



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