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17

The amount of acid in a properly mixed batch of StarSan is less than in a bottle of Coke. I've been using it for years and find it extremely effective as a sanitizer. I never rinse and it has had no adverse effect on my beer. In fact, I've won several awards since I started using it. The commonly heard refrain is "Don't fear the foam!"


9

Just use water. The evaporating liquid does not need to be a sanitizer, per se.


8

I had similar fears after reading the warnings on the label until I read Palmer's How to Brew, 3rd Ed. p. 23, as part of his discussion of different methods of cleaning and sanitizing: StarSan is only effective when the pH of the solution is less than 3.5. ... This is also the reason it is a no-rinse sanitizer: When the fermenter or bottle has been ...


7

Just after post the question I found the Tech Sheet on Five Star's website. It says that the sanitizer is good so long as the pH remains below 3. Since I'm keeping it in a spary bottle with distilled water it shouldn't ever get above 3.


6

I usually just boil the hop bag and string for a couple of minutes. I've not used dental floss - I'm not sure that fresh minty taste is needed in the beer. I use starsan for pretty much all my sanitation duties, but my reservations about using starsan here are that it may not penetrate deep into the material of the hop bag, but really this is probably ...


6

You can store star san in an air tight container for up to 2-3 weeks and as long as the pH is below 3 it is still good. It is also best to mix with RO or distilled which will keep the solution from becoming cloudy. If you use regular tap water the minerals will react with the acid and can turn the star san cloudy but it still is ok to use as long as the pH ...


5

Don't worry about the foam, as far as I remember Charlie Tally, Head Chemist at 5 Star, has said that the starsan is broken down by the yeast. Also, when you fill the bottle most of the foam comes out as a "StarSan Worm", so there's relatively little left in the bottle. If you've not had any problems with head in your beer then your existing methods are ...


4

The difference between "drinking" tap water and "rinsing" with it is that our body can handle whatever small amount of bacteria may be in the water, but the conditions for fermenting beer are also ideal for bacteria to grow and multiply so that insignificant amount of bacteria we normally drink can grow under the right conditions (in the fermenter or bottle) ...


3

You can probably achieve adequate sanitation with some very thorough spraying, but the spray from a bottle is not exactly uniform. And I'm not sure how you'd get the inside of tubing effectively besides filling it and sloshing it around, which is certainly an option. You don't need to dispose of Star-San after using it. You can keep it around for a while, ...


3

Smell: Smells like beer. Look: Looks like beer. Taste: Tastes like beer. Verdict: It's beer! I think the issue here was paranoia of using a new sanitiser and tech. The Krausen looked to me like colony of 'something' floating on clear head, instead of all the foam looking brown and Krausen like.


3

Keep in mind that you don't actually have to submerge things in StarSan for it to be effective. You can mix it in a spray bottle with distilled water. It will stay good for months at least...a year isn't out if the question. Then you can spray things rather than submersing them in a bucketful. A 30 second contact time is 99.5% effective according to ...


3

I would suggest the iodine-based sanitizer knows as "Iodophor" if you really feel the need to sanitize the water: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodophor This stuff is an iodine-based sanitizer, fairly common in homebrewing (but probably not as common as Star San). I started out my homebrewing career with it, and still have some left. A big bottle goes a ...


3

Water - it's cheap, it's always available, and does the job adequately. No need for anything else when something so simple works so well.


3

I've not used it myself, but found that some high ranking members over at www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk use it. They say they got it at the Pharmacist at ASDA for about £4.50 for a 500ml bottle. This is then diluted to 2.5ml in 2000ml water, so it's going to last a while! 1.25ml/l is the usual concentration. 2.5ml/l is the maximum no-rinse concentration. ...


2

I'm still using the same 32oz bottle that I bought four and a half years ago with no problems. To check for potency of the made-up solution ensure that the pH is below 3.5 check that there is still some foaming when shaken


2

Thats how I do it and I've never had a problem. In my own paranoia about the bag, I have moved to soaking a small nylon type bag and the fibers are non porous like muslin. I soak it overnight in a small dish of starsan and I am good to go in the morning. Dental floss is a great trick too, just use the non-flavored/scented kind. I tend to dry hop in the keg ...


2

I can't speak with any authority, but it appears to be similar but not identical. The color of the product appears more amber/brown, and the disclaimer that it needs to be drained well doesn't seem to be quite the same as StarSan's motto of "don't fear the foam". However, they are both acid-based sanitizers and likely work in a similar method. If it's ...


2

I keep mixed star san in my corny kegs for storage, that's always been fine. But that star san is only used to keep the inside of the kegs clean during their down time. We keep an eye on as to how long they have been in there and purge them with CO2. For brewing use, I also keep a spray bottle of it handy, checking the PH every now and again. I've ...


2

Well the active ingredient in PBW is 30% Sodium Metasilicate and the rest composed primarily of percarbonate (Oxyclean) and sodium bicarbonate. So the recipe you link to directly is not the same (which isn't to say it isn't a good cleaner). No access to iodophor? As to sanitizer. My suggestion and goto when I don't have starsan is to use a 2 tbsp Bleach, ...


2

Star San is not a cleaner, only a sanitizer. But boy is it a great sanitizer; well worth the price. 30 second contact time, foams readily, no-rinse, breaks down to yeast nutrient. Only thing I'll use or recommend. (Hint: mix it with distilled water, and it'll last "indefinitely"; that sure helps the cost go down. :)


1

This question has been answered already, but I wanted to add to the testimonials! It's definitely worth the cost and lasts for months (I've never gone a year but I wouldn't be afraid to). Having a spray bottle is very handy for the fact that it works quick and is reliable. It may be small, but no one has touched on this yet: the customer service is ...


1

I always have a spray bottle of Star San made up. It's definitely adequate for small items and touch-ups, but I slosh around a gallon of Star San in my carboys since it's easier. The other thing I do to sanitize some things is to wet a paper towel and then wipe the surface. The only thing that matters is that you wet all the surfaces and then give it a ...


1

I tried using a swamp cooler, but found picnic ice packs to be much more effective. After the initial investment, they are free. I just change them out a couple of times a day for the first three to four days.


1

I'd personally use bleach for this--get some white fabric instead. One teaspoon per gallon is a good minimal concentration. Maybe try 2 tsp. Whatever you use, it will end up concentrating, as evaporation (like distillation) will leave behind everything but the water. Wash your fabric occasionally to remove this concentration (phosphates and organic ...


1

Foil. :) Either vodka or star-san are perfectly fine. Water will work just as well. The liquid in an airlock does not strictly need to be sanitary, it just needs to provide a barrier for insects, primarily.



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