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11

It depends on the beer and the storage conditions. To start, the stronger and hoppier the beer, the longer it will keep. For instance, a hefeweizen won't keep as long as a barleywine. The temperature is also important. Generally, cooler is better. The main thing is to avoid excessively high (85+) temps. Avoiding temp swings helps, but it's mainly high ...


10

In short, it depends. The April 10th, 2008 episode of Basic Brewing Radio is all about glass and skunking. How Fast? Unprotected beer will rapidly skunk. I had a keg of blonde ale in the sun one summer afternoon. The beer in the three feet of tubing spoiled in less than a minute. The small volume of skunky beer was strong enough to ruin an entire pint. ...


4

http://beeradvocate.com/articles/527 Skunking is described in this article as UV radiation caused breakdown of "hop derived molecules, called isohumulones", which then bond with sulfur, giving you a skunk-like smell. As other articles have said over and over, keep your beer cool and dark. You should have a safe, cool, dark storage place for your beer to ...


4

I agree with the comments in Jack Smiths post, however, I'll offer this answer to the Original Posters question. If you have the "racking from" and the "racking to" vessels protected from light during the racking process, the short time the beer spends flowing through the tubing should produce a miniscule amount of skunk and be undetectable. The amount of ...


4

Your options are: Leave it: You have already put the effort in to make the brew so I would say just leave it until it is ready to bottle. Buy a second fermenter: then transfer the remaining beer to it after it has been cleaned and sterilized. Fix the leak: Depending on the size of the leak you could try to stem the flow with either vasonline, tape it up, ...


3

BrewYourOwn magazine (Mar/Apr 2011) just did an experiment on how storage temps affect home brew. Their main finding was just as Denny said: high temps will degrade the beer and cause off-flavors. In this experiment the "high temps" were >100° (like in an attic during the summer) for weeks at a time. "Room temp" storage was almost indistinguishable from ...


2

How was the crushed grain stored? It possibly soaked up ambient moisture, due to high relative humidity. Since it was crushed, it had more surface area to absorb the water. There was some discussion of humidity and efficiency on Brew Strong, a few years ago.


2

Like Brewchez and Denny have said, avoiding high temperatures and light are the most important parts. I've found that a lot of my "muddy" beers have cleaned up after around a year of storage in a dark ~65F closet. Case in point, I had a pumpkin ale that was neigh undrinkable two years ago, and almost an entire case remained in the closet. This fall I dug ...


1

The original Mr Beer has holes in the top half that let air out, there was no airlock. So you could have filled it higher than designed and with a vigorous fermentation some yeast leaked out. You can tape paper towels to the outside to see where the leak is, but if it's on top then it may be by design. if not, as suggested use "food grade" silicone. The ...


1

Yes, you can make it with a vinegar mother or leaving it alone, with cheesecloth to keep out the flies. If you want a mother, you can get them a lot of places, even Amazon. Wine Spectator (or all places) has a great blurb on it: http://www.winespectator.com/drvinny/show/id/5023 If you think it hasn't been hit by bugs carrying acetobacter or another ...


1

What I have heard about malt that is old is that the conversion time may increase due to decreased or degraded enzymes. It will potentially yield as much sugar as usual but may take an extra 30-60 minutes to fully convert. If this is the case your 60 minute mash may have only converted a portion of the starch. You have also used too much sparge water ...



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