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18

Personally I compost it most of the time. I have used it to make bread, and pizza crust. Typically i just grab maybe 2 cups of it while it's still wet and fresh from the mash, then add the typical ingredients of a wheat bread recipe (milk, butter, etc). I then add enough flour to make the dough ball 'look like dough', then proceed as normal. I'm pretty ...


11

My dogs absolutely love spent grain dog biscuits, I use this recipe (originally from here): 4 cups spent grain 4 cups flour 1 cup peanut butter (or oil or pizza sauce) 1 egg Mix together thoroughly (get your hands in there!), place onto lined baking tray in whatever shapes you like and bake for 30 mins at 350F/180C then reduce heat to around 225F/110C ...


8

Bread. By far the most common product of homebrewer's spent grains (don't fact-check me ;)). With just 3 cups of (wet) grains, you can make a couple loaves of excellent bread. Our recent recipe: 3 cups of wet grains (in this case they were 2 parts Crystal 120 and 1 part Special B) 3-4 cups of flour (depending on grain's water content) "a ...


8

Dog biscuits, I'll try and find the recipe I used. 1/12/10 EDIT Here is the recipe I use. I've modified it a bit from a common one that I found on line a couple years back. 4cups spent grain 4cups flour 2 Egg whites 1.5 cups Peanut Butter. Mix it all up roll it out the best you can and then make shapes, rectangles whatever. I actually have a dogbone ...


6

Spent grain is great for composting. You probably do not have enough to warrant making some kind of arrangement with a farm to use the spent grain as feed, but that is what many commercial breweries do.


5

If you've got backyard chickens, they love the leftover mash, especially if it's still warm. I'm planning to take some of the mash from my last batch of beer, freeze it in 1-quart freezer bags, and then pull it out and microwave it to feed them on cold mornings.


4

You could make granola. Some have praised this recipe or slight variations of it: http://www.healthywithheather.com/2011/07/cinnamon-coconut-crunch-spent-grain-granola/


4

I've got a buddy in San Diego that makes dog treats out of the spent grain: http://doggiebeerbones.com/ I thought that was pretty cool!


4

Any nearby hobby farms with cows? I understand it makes a fine food for cows. The deers and/or bears (not sure yet exactly which) that pass through my yard seem to enjoy it.


4

The answer is: Every bacteria that exists in your local area. Lacto, brett, wild yeast, and less pleasant wee beasties. Its unlikely that any bacteria on your grain survived the mashing process. Not impossible, but unlikely. I have no doubt that its a combination of all of those factors. My advice would be to never let anything sit around dirty. Clean ...


3

If you're looking for a more technical description, you want to look into the process of "mashing". Beer mashing and spirits mashing operate on essentially the same principles. For a typical barley malt, roughly 80% of the mash by weight will be converted into sugars. In other words, if you mash with 10 pounds of malt, roughly 8 pounds will end up dissolved ...


3

That smell is mostly form pedicoccus. Its a bacteria that work aerobically and it has a vomit like smell. Lacto is anaerobic and has a fairly clean aroma. When doing sourmashes (leaving the mash for a few days at ~110-120F) there will often be a layer of nasty smelling malt on the top that can be scooped out. The mash underneath is soured and very ...


3

You can make a flour from the grain, and follow any of the recipes listed here: http://brooklynbrewshop.com/themash/category/spentgrainchef/


2

It has been suggested to me that I add my spent grain to the local brewery's or brew pub's spent grain. They apparently have an arrangement with local farmers who can use it. I have not yet contacted them to arrange adding my grain to the pile, but I plan to. Sure beats throwing it away.


2

I have a friend with chickens. They love the spent grain. Sometimes, when there isn't too much, I throw it right on my lawn and rake it around. If you want to make bread with grain just use any whole-grain recipe. I do not dry out the grains because it can mess up the wet to dry ratio of the recipe. Usually I take it out of the bag and make bread with it ...


2

Last summer my roommate was maintaining a compost heap. The grains would all go into that. The better I rinsed the grains, the less stinky this would become after a few days. Sort of a natural efficiency check.


2

I compost them, they seem to break down fairly quickly. I don't know if they stink or not, there's a reason the compost pile is far from my house though.


2

Spent grain goes bad fast, and when it goes bad, it's bad. And not a little bad. bad. not even bad in fact. bad I've used spent grains in compost for a long time and if you don't mix it in while it's still hot (or if you're unlucky enough to leave it sitting for a few hours or - god forbid - days) you will face a soul-crushing, stomach-lurching, ...


2

Since the process before distilling is basically the same as beer making, here is what happens: You mill the barley and make your 'barley soup', the mash You then drain the liquid from the soup (wort) and put that to ferment Back on your soup kettle (mash tun) you are left with the barley kernels and husks. During the mash you extracted a (hopefully) ...


1

I dump grains out (way out) in the back yard. They are usually mostly gone the next morning. Don't know who (or more likely, what) takes them, but that's the point.


1

I've made bread, used them in compost, brought them down to my mother's place to give to the donkeys and horses.


1

Our chickens love a bit of spent gain. Although we only have two chickens so we still end up composing most of it.



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