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4

The answer is: Every bacteria that exists in your local area. Lacto, brett, wild yeast, and less pleasant wee beasties. Its unlikely that any bacteria on your grain survived the mashing process. Not impossible, but unlikely. I have no doubt that its a combination of all of those factors. My advice would be to never let anything sit around dirty. Clean ...


3

That smell is mostly form pedicoccus. Its a bacteria that work aerobically and it has a vomit like smell. Lacto is anaerobic and has a fairly clean aroma. When doing sourmashes (leaving the mash for a few days at ~110-120F) there will often be a layer of nasty smelling malt on the top that can be scooped out. The mash underneath is soured and very ...


3

If you're looking for a more technical description, you want to look into the process of "mashing". Beer mashing and spirits mashing operate on essentially the same principles. For a typical barley malt, roughly 80% of the mash by weight will be converted into sugars. In other words, if you mash with 10 pounds of malt, roughly 8 pounds will end up dissolved ...


2

Spent grain goes bad fast, and when it goes bad, it's bad. And not a little bad. bad. not even bad in fact. bad I've used spent grains in compost for a long time and if you don't mix it in while it's still hot (or if you're unlucky enough to leave it sitting for a few hours or - god forbid - days) you will face a soul-crushing, stomach-lurching, ...


2

Since the process before distilling is basically the same as beer making, here is what happens: You mill the barley and make your 'barley soup', the mash You then drain the liquid from the soup (wort) and put that to ferment Back on your soup kettle (mash tun) you are left with the barley kernels and husks. During the mash you extracted a (hopefully) ...



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