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7

First of all, in order to think that melanoidin is a sub for decoction you have to believe that decoction has an impact on flavor. My own experiments, as well as those of others, do not support that. Melanoidin will boost the maltiness of the beer in a kind of sweet, fruity manner, as well as have an impact on flavor as you describe. Too much of it will ...


6

3 weeks, maybe longer of you keep them in humidity free environment. buy yourself a half pound of crystal 60L. Tatse it each day for a few weeks. The crisp crunch will fade soon as the grain sucks up moisture.


4

They are 2 different things. Specialty grains will have a direct impact on the flavor of the beer, with a secondary impact on body and mouthfeel. Mash time, temp, and process will have a primary impact on body and mouthfeel and secondarily on flavor. But specialty grains and mash manipulation can have large effects on the beer that will overlap to some ...


4

English chocolate malt provides color with more smoothness and less roast character than typical US chocolate malt. Brewery.org says this on it's malt 101 page Chocolate Malt - ( Brown malt) 400 L British Chocolate malt is ideal for British Porters and Brown or Mild Ales and even Stouts. It's a little darker than domestic Chocolate malt yet it ...


4

I don't know if there's a "proper" way to do it, but I've always used a grain bag with good results up until my most recent batch. Time and temperature vary based on the grains being used and desired flavor profile, among other variables. For my most recent batch I steeped 2 pounds of specialty grains in 3 quarts of water in a separate pot, drained this ...


3

So, from a different perspective, steeping grains is just the same thing as mashing, you're just using a bag to remove the grains rather than draining the water from the grain bed. I'm also not sure that there is a "proper" way, but just like a mash the temperature and amount of water you have mixed in with your grain makes a significant difference in what ...


3

I agree with brewchez. But, here's a good listing if you still want it. http://byo.com/resources/grains


3

Crystal 15L would have been a closer sub I think, even though the carastan is around 30-35L. I don't think there is a real good substitute for it. There aren't a lot of malts like it, and I don't see too many people use it. I put it in an Ordinary Bitter last year and it does have a nice toffee aroma to it. A combo of C15 and some special roast might get ...


2

Five percent of your grain bill is generally a good starting point for Melanoidin Malt contribution. Be cautious using more, as Melanoidin Malt has a very powerful and distinct flavor. I think I've also seen a comparison somewhere on the internet between decoction mashing and Melanoidin Malt, so maybe Denny will weigh in on this one...


2

CaraBohemian is the commercial name for a Wyermann malt. Its listed uses are as followed, from the Wyermann site: Bohemian Lagers Bohemian Dark Lagers Bohemian Bock Beers Bohemian Specialty Beers Porter Stout Ales Bock Beers October Beers So your instincts are dead on for the uses for this malt. It is designed to be up to 15 percent of your total grist. ...


1

A mash is certainly more flexible and gives the brewer the most freedom, while extracts+steeping grain is far more convenient and requires much less equipment. In the mash, you can achieve a more malty beer simply by using more malt, or using a variety that has a strong maltiness to it. (I'm thinking Maris Otter, but also Munich malt) It would be hard to ...


1

As has been stated already, you are talking about two completely different things from "How to Brew chapter 13.1" there are basically two kinds of malts: those that need to be mashed and those that don't. ... Specialty malts like caramel and roasted malts do not need to be mashed. These malts have undergone a special kilning process in which the ...


1

Really hard to tell the difference just based on Lovibond.. You can have 2 different 350L US chocolate malt that taste very different to each other. Reason being 350L only tells you the finished darkness of the malt, but it does not tell you how its kilned ie, short time in high heat, or long time in a staggered temperature schedule. It all makes a big ...


1

Everyone's palate is different and the subtleties between the malts will be different person to person. I recommend planning out several mini batches and mini mashes of just the base malts to really get into it. I'd also say that making a big batch of simple extra light extra malt and steeping 0.5-0.75 lbs of specialty malts in one gallon batches to get a ...


1

According to Homebrew Talk, the terms Crystal malt and Caramel malt are used interchangeably



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