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7

Yes, it is OK squeeze. In fact, you want as much extract as possible from the specialty malts. It is a common myth that squeezing the grain bag is a bad idea due to "tannins being extracted" or similar. There is no reason for this to be true --- tannins are extracted from the grain (husk) only if the temperature during steeping/mashing is too high. And then ...


6

Special B and CaraPils are as different as night and day, so it's going to be hard to compare them directly. Special B is a very dark Crystal Malt (about 140-150L), typically Belgian in origin, which is used to add flavors like: very dark caramel, raisin, or plum. It is the specialty grain that makes Belgian Amber Abbey Ales taste a bit raisin-like, and ...


5

Some specialty grains (e.g. dextrin/cara-pils) need to be mashed. These need to be mashed, because they require a chemical reaction to take place to be useful. Some (e.g. crystal) need only to be steeped, but can also be put in the mash. These do not need a chemical reaction to take place to be useful, they just need to have the chemicals in them extracted ...


5

I like PJs answer, so I'll mention percentages. I think starting at twenty % of the total fermentable is a good place to start. Then you work up more and more by say 10% at a time as you are comfortable and you equipment allows. Eventually, you'll be doing 50-60% from the partial mash and you'll be just one step from going around the corner to all-grain ...


4

I don't think you will have a problem at all - even though it is technically 6x the recipe, it is still a relatively small proportion of your whole batch, which is mostly pils. Sure, the color won't be as light, but I think the sweetness won't be crazy overwhelming with under 1lb and will probably be nice to have another flavor in the beer aside from ...


4

You may get some oxidation of the "specialty" wort letting it sit like that. You aren't really saving any time though. Start your steep in cold water while you heat it up. By the time its at 160F you are generally good to pull the grains out and keep on heating to boiling. I know most instructions when I started extract and grain brewing says to steep in ...


4

When I do a partial mash, I heat about 3 gallons in my kettle to 155-160˚F. Then I'll put my grains in a grain bag, and leave them in the water for about an hour. Generally, most of your fermentables are coming from the extract. The grains in the partial mash lend mostly color and flavor, and not too much sugar, though they do give some. After an hour, ...


3

To find out which grains can be steeped, see Steeping Speciality Grains in John Palmer's "How to brew". On a practical level, steeping and mashing are almost the same thing - you soak grains in water. The key differences between steeping and mashing is this: steeped grains have most of the starches already converted (Cara/Crystal malt, highly kilned ...


3

I used to do this. Can't say that it really hurt or helped. I eventually started to just put the bag in an empty pot and started my boil in the main pot. Then I'd add whatever came out of the bag into the boil later when I got around to it after the boil had gotten started. And unless there is base malt in the bag with your specialty grains its not a mash ...


3

"The best solution for even, consistent mills is always the local HBS.". I'd have to disagree with that. All too often, I hear from people who get poor or inconsistent crushes from the LHBS due to constant readjustment of the mill there. The absolute best way to consistently get the crush that works best for you is to own your own mill. That may not be ...


2

Flaked oats, like quaker oats, have been pregelatinized so you can mash them directly. Malted or not has nothing to do with it. Irish oats or steel cut need to under go a gelatinization process, via cooking them. This makes the starches accessable to the mashing process. You can add your specialty grains if you don't have space limitations in your ...


2

With the 'tea' being added to your 60 minute boil, and as long as you follow good sanitation procedures, I don't see any major problems that you would run into. But, you can much more easily just steep your grains in your brew pot while bringing your water up to a boil. This won't add time to your brew day, and will save you time having to deal with ...


2

I don't think it would be a problem, just transfer it to your clean & sanitized fermenting bucket and put the lid and air lock on. the next day transfer back to the boiling pot. the only real down side I could see is it will take longer to bring to a boil.


2

I've done it maybe 5-6 times and there's no problem. I keep the liquid from the steeping refrigerated overnight and boil it the next day. But as has been said, there may not be much time saving from it. If you think it would help you, there's no problem with it, though.


2

If you are looking to minimize the roast character and are looking get that smooth, chocolaty thing you may want to use pale chocolate malt. It is much smoother than regular chocolate malt. However, if you up the fruit and reduce the roast, you may get a better reception by calling the beer a black ale vs. a stout. It sounds balanced based on your ...


2

You can go both ways on this. You can let it slowly drip out, or you can squeeze (definitely with gloves) as long as a few extra precautions are taken. I would recommend setting a sieve/fine-mesh strainer over your boil kettle to catch any protein matter that comes out of the bag when you squeeze, and be aware that if the pH of your water while doing the ...


2

Pick a style of beer that is balanced more toward malt than hops -- a highly hopped IPA is going to hide a lot of the malt flavor. Something like an ordinary or special Bitter, Scottish ales, blond ale, or many of the lagers will give much more malt flavor. American Ale yeast (Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001) tend to be very neutral, as do some of the ...


2

Brewing is a lot like cooking. You can't often try ingredients in isolation - you wouldn't normally eat pure salt, pepper, chili, vinegar etc... the taste would be far more potent than it would normally be. But combined with some other ingredients (meat, fish, tomatoes etc..), they become wonderful with something else to play off. The same is true with ...


2

I generally agree with most of the recommendations, but I would shy away from a lot of the hops choices, especially Fuggles. It has an earthy, woody flavor that could conflict. I'd recommend a small bittering addition using a very neutral hop like Magnum with no other hops. Also, if you just want to learn the flavor of grains, it's easy to make a tea with ...


2

I always put the grain bag in a strainer and pour 2-4 quarts of 155-160f water slowly through the bag to remove anything additional from grains. This is the extract brewer's sparge equivalent. I've never read anywhere that squeezing was a good thing, but I have read from several reliable sources that it's a bad thing.


2

To expand from Chris Dargis's comments, specialty grains are called that because they contribute more flavor than they do fermentable sugars. In extract and partial mash brewing (what you're looking at doing), the fermentable sugars come mostly from your extract, where the specialty grains supplement the beer by contributing other characteristics such as ...


1

You typically do not need to mash Cara-helles or Caravienne. They are fully converted during the process used to make them the crystal malts that they are. They can be steeped in your wort post lautering and pre-boil.


1

The only issue that might come up is if it sours, but when I intentionally sour my mash (pre-boil) with a handful of raw grains, it typically takes 2 to 3 days, normally at 100F (38C) temps (but has happened once at ambient temp and no injection after about 5 days). I would imagine 24 hours is not nearly enough time at ambient temps and certainly not at ...


1

In the fridge it will be fine. And it was only specialty grains, so there is very little sugars there and likely no conversion of what was there. I have done overnight mashes before and there is no issue with souring in the wort the next day. I wouldn't worry about it. Just start heating it and start where you left off. (And you could always ferment in ...


1

Sounds like it's ok. The cool temperatures of the fridge will slow down the organisms in the mash, but ideally it should have been boiled for a few minutes to make it sterile. And then boiled again prior to use (as you would anyway when adding the hops.)


1

I use bags too. I have my rinse water ready to go and use the multi dip method of rinsing, like if you are dipping tea bags in a mug. Then, I use a stainless spatchula and a steamer tray from my rinse pot that sorta looks like a shallow collander (stainless), that came with my pot used for rinsing. I put the bag in the steamer and press with the spatchula to ...


1

There's no need to split each grain into its own bag, unless you want to remove them at different time intervals for whatever reason (hint: you don't. ;) If they'll all comfortably fit in one bag, great. If not split them up. Maximizing water contact is … probably negligible, here.


1

Wort juice will sour if left exposed to air below 150F. You can put it in a sanitized, sealed container, but I wouldn't leave it for more than 18 hours. Longer if you refrigerate it. But all of this sounds like more work and more risk than just steeping it when you need it.


1

Each of those tastes quite different from the other. Special B is more like a raisiny Crystal 120L than anything. Carapils is going to give you a lot of dextrins, and is probably what you're after as far as a thicker mouthfeel and head retention, but it isn't going to add much in the way of flavor. Some flaked adjunct grains (barley, oats, etc.) would ...


1

As an all-grain BIAB guy I dump my bag in a bucket with an upside down colander. I suppose you could do the same for a steeping bag in a small pot using the same method.



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